Day 121 May 20, 2011 - History

Day 121 May 20, 2011 - History


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10:00AM THE PRESIDENT receives the Presidential Daily Briefing Oval Office Closed Press 

11:15AM THE PRESIDENT meets with President Netanyahu of Israel Oval Office

12:05PM THE PRESIDENT and President Netanyahu deliver statements to the press Oval Office Pool Spray at the Bottom

12:30PM THE PRESIDENT holds a working lunch with President Netanyahu of Israel Old Family Dining Room

3:10PM THE PRESIDENT delivers remarks to CIA Employees CIA Headquarters, Langley, Virginia Pooled Press


26 U.S. Code § 121 - Exclusion of gain from sale of principal residence

Gross income shall not include gain from the sale or exchange of property if, during the 5-year period ending on the date of the sale or exchange, such property has been owned and used by the taxpayer as the taxpayer’s principal residence for periods aggregating 2 years or more.

The amount of gain excluded from gross income under subsection (a) with respect to any sale or exchange shall not exceed $250,000.

If such spouses do not meet the requirements of subparagraph (A), the limitation under paragraph (1) shall be the sum of the limitations under paragraph (1) to which each spouse would be entitled if such spouses had not been married. For purposes of the preceding sentence, each spouse shall be treated as owning the property during the period that either spouse owned the property.

Subsection (a) shall not apply to any sale or exchange by the taxpayer if, during the 2-year period ending on the date of such sale or exchange, there was any other sale or exchange by the taxpayer to which subsection (a) applied.

In the case of a sale or exchange of property by an unmarried individual whose spouse is deceased on the date of such sale, paragraph (1) shall be applied by substituting “$500,000” for “$250,000” if such sale occurs not later than 2 years after the date of death of such spouse and the requirements of paragraph (2)(A) were met immediately before such date of death.

Subsection (a) shall not apply to so much of the gain from the sale or exchange of property as is allocated to periods of nonqualified use.

The term “period of nonqualified use” means any period (other than the portion of any period preceding January 1, 2009 ) during which the property is not used as the principal residence of the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s spouse or former spouse.

If a husband and wife make a joint return for the taxable year of the sale or exchange of the property, subsections (a) and (c) shall apply if either spouse meets the ownership and use requirements of subsection (a) with respect to such property.

For purposes of this section, in the case of an unmarried individual whose spouse is deceased on the date of the sale or exchange of property, the period such unmarried individual owned and used such property shall include the period such deceased spouse owned and used such property before death.

In the case of an individual holding property transferred to such individual in a transaction described in section 1041(a), the period such individual owns such property shall include the period the transferor owned the property.

Solely for purposes of this section, an individual shall be treated as using property as such individual’s principal residence during any period of ownership while such individual’s spouse or former spouse is granted use of the property under a divorce or separation instrument.

For purposes of this section, the destruction, theft, seizure, requisition, or condemnation of property shall be treated as the sale of such property.

In applying section 1033 (relating to involuntary conversions), the amount realized from the sale or exchange of property shall be treated as being the amount determined without regard to this section, reduced by the amount of gain not included in gross income pursuant to this section.

If the basis of the property sold or exchanged is determined (in whole or in part) under section 1033(b) (relating to basis of property acquired through involuntary conversion), then the holding and use by the taxpayer of the converted property shall be treated as holding and use by the taxpayer of the property sold or exchanged.

Subsection (a) shall not apply to so much of the gain from the sale of any property as does not exceed the portion of the depreciation adjustments (as defined in section 1250(b)(3)) attributable to periods after May 6, 1997 , in respect of such property.

At the election of the taxpayer, this section shall not fail to apply to the sale or exchange of an interest in a principal residence by reason of such interest being a remainder interest in such residence, but this section shall not apply to any other interest in such residence which is sold or exchanged separately.

Subparagraph (A) shall not apply to any sale to, or exchange with, any person who bears a relationship to the taxpayer which is described in section 267(b) or 707(b).

The 5-year period described in subsection (a) shall not be extended more than 10 years by reason of subparagraph (A).

The term “section 101(a)(5) of title 10, United States Code, as in effect on the date of the enactment of this paragraph.

The term “Foreign Service Act of 1980, as in effect on the date of the enactment of this paragraph.

The term “extended duty” means any period of active duty pursuant to a call or order to such duty for a period in excess of 90 days or for an indefinite period.

An election under subparagraph (A) with respect to any property may not be made if such an election is in effect with respect to any other property.

An election under subparagraph (A) may be revoked at any time.

If a taxpayer acquires property in an exchange with respect to which gain is not recognized (in whole or in part) to the taxpayer under subsection (a) or (b) of section 1031, subsection (a) shall not apply to the sale or exchange of such property by such taxpayer (or by any person whose basis in such property is determined, in whole or in part, by reference to the basis in the hands of such taxpayer) during the 5-year period beginning with the date of such acquisition.

For purposes of subparagraph (A), rules similar to the rules of subparagraphs (B) and (D) of paragraph (9) shall apply.

This section shall not apply to any sale or exchange by an individual if the treatment provided by section 877(a)(1) applies to such individual.

This section shall not apply to any sale or exchange with respect to which the taxpayer elects not to have this section apply.

For purposes of this section, in the case of property the acquisition of which by the taxpayer resulted under section 1034 [1] (as in effect on the day before the date of the enactment of this section) in the nonrecognition of any part of the gain realized on the sale or exchange of another residence, in determining the period for which the taxpayer has owned and used such property as the taxpayer’s principal residence, there shall be included the aggregate periods for which such other residence (and each prior residence taken into account under section 1223(6) [1] in determining the holding period of such property) had been so owned and used.

The date of the enactment of this paragraph, referred to in subsec. (d)(9)(C)(ii), (iii), is the date of enactment of Pub. L. 108–121, which was approved Nov. 11, 2003 .

Section 103 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980, referred to in subsec. (d)(9)(C)(iii), is classified to section 3903 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse.

Section 1034 (as in effect on the day before the date of the enactment of this section), referred to in subsec. (g), probably means section 1034 of this title as in effect on the day before the date of enactment of Pub. L. 105–34 which amended this section generally and was approved Aug. 5, 1997 . Section 1034 was repealed by Pub. L. 105–34, title III, § 312(b), Aug. 5, 1997 , 111 Stat. 839.

Section 1223(6), referred to in subsec. (g), was repealed by Pub. L. 113–295, div. A, title II, § 221(a)(80)(C), Dec. 19, 2014 , 128 Stat. 4049.

Pub. L. 109–135, title IV, § 403(ee)(1), (nn), Dec. 21, 2005 , 119 Stat. 2631, 2632, which directed that subsec. (d) of this section be amended by redesignating the paragraph (10) relating to property acquired from a decedent as paragraph (11), effective as if included in the provisions to which such amendment relates of the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004, Pub. L. 108–357, was executed as the probable intent of Congress by redesignating as paragraph (11) the paragraph (10) directed to be added to subsec. (d) of this section by Pub. L. 107–16, § 542(c), (f)(1), applicable to estates of decedents dying after Dec. 31, 2009 . See Codification note, 2001, 2003, and 2005 Amendment notes, and Effective Date of 2005 Amendment note below.

Pub. L. 108–121, title I, § 101(a), (b)(1), Nov. 11, 2003 , 117 Stat. 1336, which directed that subsec. (d) of this section be amended by redesignating paragraph (9) as (10) and adding a new paragraph (9), effective as if included in the amendments made by section 312 of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997, Pub. L. 105–34, could not literally be executed insofar as it directed the redesignation because subsec. (d), as amended by Pub. L. 105–34, did not contain a paragraph (9). However, to reflect the probable intent of Congress , the amendment was executed by redesignating as paragraph (10) the paragraph (9) directed to be added to subsec. (d) of this section by Pub. L. 107–16, § 542(c), (f)(1), applicable to estates of decedents dying after Dec. 31, 2009 . See Codification note above and 2001, 2003, and 2005 Amendment notes and Effective Date of 2003 Amendment note below.

2014—Subsec. (b)(3). Pub. L. 113–295, § 221(a)(20), struck out subpar. (A) designation and heading and subpar. (B) and realigned margins. Prior to amendment, text of subpar. (B) read as follows: “Subparagraph (A) shall be applied without regard to any sale or exchange before May 7, 1997 .”

Subsec. (b)(4), (5). Pub. L. 113–295, § 212(c), redesignated par. (4), relating to exclusion of gain allocated to nonqualified use, as (5).

Subsec. (d)(12)(B). Pub. L. 113–295, § 213(c)(1), inserted “of paragraph (9)” after “and (D)”.

2010—Subsec. (d)(11). Pub. L. 111–312 amended subsec. (d) to read as if amendment by Pub. L. 107–16, § 542(c), which originally added par. (9), had never been enacted. See Codification notes above and 2001 Amendment note and Effective Date of 2010 Amendment note below. Prior to amendment, par. (11) read as follows: “ Property acquired from a decedent .—The exclusion under this section shall apply to property sold by—

“(A) the estate of a decedent,

“(B) any individual who acquired such property from the decedent (within the meaning of section 1022), and

“(C) a trust which, immediately before the death of the decedent, was a qualified revocable trust (as defined in section 645(b)(1)) established by the decedent,

determined by taking into account the ownership and use by the decedent.”

2008—Subsec. (b)(4). Pub. L. 110–289 added par. (4) relating to exclusion of gain allocated to nonqualified use.

Subsec. (d)(9)(C)(vi). Pub. L. 110–245, § 113(b), struck out heading and text of cl. (vi). Text read as follows: “AnPub. L. 110–245, § 113(a), struck out heading and text of subpar. (E). Text read as follows: “Clause (iii) of subparagraph (A) shall not apply with respect to any sale or exchange after December 31, 2010 .”

2007—Subsec. (b)(4). Pub. L. 110–142 added par. (4) relating to special rule for certain sales by surviving spouses.

“(i) as a member of the Pub. L. 109–432, § 417(b), added cl. (iv) and redesignated former cl. (iv) as (v).

2005—Subsec. (d)(10). Pub. L. 109–135, § 403(ee)(2), amended heading and text of par. (10) relating to property acquired in like-kind exchange generally. Prior to amendment, text read as follows: “If a taxpayer acquired property in an exchange to which section 1031 applied, subsection (a) shall not apply to the sale or exchange of such property if it occurs during the 5-year period beginning with the date of the acquisition of such property.”

Subsec. (d)(11). Pub. L. 109–135, § 403(ee)(1), redesignated par. (10), formerly par. (9), as added by Pub. L. 107–16, as (11). See Codification notes above and 2001 and 2003 Amendment notes and Effective Date of 2001 Amendment note below.

Subsec. (g). Pub. L. 109–135, § 402(a)(3), substituted “section 1223(6)” for “section 1223(7)”.

2004—Subsec. (d)(10). Pub. L. 108–357 added par. (10) relating to property acquired in like-kind exchange.

2003—Subsec. (d)(9), (10). Pub. L. 108–121 added par. (9) and redesignated former par. (9), as added by Pub. L. 107–16, as (10). See Codification notes above and 2001 Amendment note and Effective Date of 2001 Amendment note below.

2001—Subsec. (d)(9). Pub. L. 107–16, § 542(c), added par. (9). See Codification notes above and Effective Date of 2001 Amendment note below.

1998—Subsec. (b)(2). Pub. L. 105–206, § 6005(e)(1), substituted “Special rules for joint returns” for “$500,000 limitation for certain joint returns” in heading and amended text generally. Prior to amendment, text read as follows: “Paragraph (1) shall be applied by substituting ‘$500,000’ for ‘$250,000’ if—

“(A) a husband and wife make a joint return for the taxable year of the sale or exchange of the property,

“(B) either spouse meets the ownership requirements of subsection (a) with respect to such property,

“(C) both spouses meet the use requirements of subsection (a) with respect to such property, and

“(D) neither spouse is ineligible for the benefits of subsection (a) with respect to such property by reason of paragraph (3).”

Subsec. (c)(1). Pub. L. 105–206, § 6005(e)(2), reenacted heading without change and amended text generally. Prior to amendment, text read as follows: “In the case of a sale or exchange to which this subsection applies, the ownership and use requirements of subsection (a) shall not apply and subsection (b)(3) shall not apply but the amount of gain excluded from gross income under subsection (a) with respect to such sale or exchange shall not exceed—

“(A) the amount which bears the same ratio to the amount which would be so excluded under this section if such requirements had been met, as

“(i) the aggregate periods, during the 5-year period ending on the date of such sale or exchange, such property has been owned and used by the taxpayer as the taxpayer’s principal residence, or

“(ii) the period after the date of the most recent prior sale or exchange by the taxpayer to which subsection (a) applied and before the date of such sale or exchange,

1997—Pub. L. 105–34 amended section catchline and text generally. Prior to amendment, section related to one-time exclusion of gain from sale of principal residence by individual who had attained age 55.

1988—Subsec. (d)(9). Pub. L. 100–647 added par. (9).

1981—Subsec. (b)(1). Pub. L. 97–34 substituted “$125,000 ($62,500” for “$100,000 ($50,000”.

1978—Pub. L. 95–600, § 404(a), substituted “One-time exclusion of gain from sale of principal residence by individual who has attained age 55” for “Gain from sale or exchange of residence of individual who has attained age 65” in section catchline.

Subsec. (a). Pub. L. 95–600, § 404(a), substituted “55” for “65”, “5-year” for “8-year”, and “3 years” for “5 years”.

Subsec. (b). Pub. L. 95–600, § 404(a), in par. (1) substituted provisions respecting dollar limitations for amount of gain for provisions setting forth applicable limitations where the adjusted sales price exceeds $35,000 and added par. (3).

Subsec. (d)(2). Pub. L. 95–600, § 404(c)(1), substituted “5-year period” for “8-year period”.

Subsec. (d)(5). Pub. L. 95–600, § 404(c)(2), substituted “5-year period” for “8-year period” and “3 years” for “5 years”.

1976—Subsec. (b)(1). Pub. L. 94–455, § 1404(a), substituted “$35,000” for “$20,000” in three places.

Subsecs. (c), (d)(5). Pub. L. 94–455, § 1906(b)(13)(A), struck out “or his delegate” after “Secretary”.

Amendment by Pub. L. 115–97 applicable to anysection 71(b)(2) of this title as in effect before Dec. 22, 2017 ) executed after Dec. 31, 2018 , and to such instruments executed on or before Dec. 31, 2018 , and modified after Dec. 31, 2018 , if the modification expressly provides that the amendment made by section 11051 of Pub. L. 115–97 applies to such modification, see section 11051(c) of Pub. L. 115–97, set out as a note under section 61 of this title.

Amendment by section 212(c) of Pub. L. 113–295 effective as if included in the provisions of the Housing Assistance Tax Act of 2008, Pub. L. 110–289, div. C, to which such amendment relates, see section 212(d) of Pub. L. 113–295, set out as a note under section 42 of this title.

Amendment by section 221(a)(20) of Pub. L. 113–295 effective Dec. 19, 2014 , subject to a savings provision, see section 221(b) of Pub. L. 113–295, set out as a note under section 1 of this title.

[Amendment by Pub. L. 112–240 (repealing section 304 of Pub. L. 111–312, formerly set out above) applicable to taxable, plan, or limitation years beginning after Dec. 31, 2012 , and estates of decedents dying, gifts made, or generation skipping transfers after Dec. 31, 2012 , see section 101(a)(3) of Pub. L. 112–240, set out as a note following former section 901 of Pub. L. 107–16 which was set out as an Effective and Termination Dates of 2001 Amendment note under section 1 of this title.]

Amendment by section 402(a)(3) of Pub. L. 109–135 effective as if included in the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Pub. L. 109–58, to which it relates, but not applicable with respect to any transaction ordered in compliance with the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 1935 (15 U.S.C. 79 et seq.) before its repeal, see section 402(m) of Pub. L. 109–135, set out as an Effective and Termination Dates of 2005 Amendments note under section 23 of this title.

Amendment by section 403(ee) of Pub. L. 109–135 effective as if included in the provision of the American Jobs Creation Act of 2004, Pub. L. 108–357, to which such amendment relates, see section 403(nn) of Pub. L. 109–135, set out as a note under section 26 of this title.

Amendment by Pub. L. 105–206 effective, except as otherwise provided, as if included in the provisions of the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997, Pub. L. 105–34, to which such amendment relates, see section 6024 of Pub. L. 105–206, set out as a note under section 1 of this title.


Nifty flapper style of full body felt. Tinted felt is clever "halo" trimming, having late style point at either side. Felt strip finishes back. Tiny ornaments also of felt. Silk lining. Dandy value at this low price.

1968 U.S. Submarine Scorpion

1968 : The nuclear-powered U.S. submarine Scorpion while heading back to Naval Base Norfolk from the Azores is heard from for the last time. The Scorpion and her crew of 99 was officially declared lost on June 5th, 1968. (The remains of the sub were later found on the ocean floor 400 miles southwest of the Azores.)

1979 U.S.A. The Twinkie defense

1979 : Dan White who had gone to see Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk to ask for his old job back, when they refuse to give him back his job he shot and killed them both. He is convicted of voluntary manslaughter ( Rather Than First Degree Murder ) after his defense lawyers argue his mental state at the time of the killings was one of diminished capacity due to depression, caused by his consumption of sugary junk food. White's defense was labeled by the press as "the Twinkie defense."

1982 Falkland Islands HMS Ardent

1982 : Argentine planes sink HMS Ardent with the loss of 22 lives in the Falklands War.

1986 U.S.A. Arms Sales To Saudi Arabia

1986 : President Reagan vetoed a resolution blocking arms sales to Saudi Arabia stating the Saudi's have helped in the war on terrorism and are vital to our strategic, political and economic interests in the middle east.

1991 India Rajiv Gandhi Assassinated

1991 : Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi is assassinated when a bomb explodes during election campaigning in the southern state of Tamil Nadu.

1992 Johnny Carson Last Tonight Show

1992 : Johnny Carson performed his last tonight show before an invited audience of celebrities and family after 3 decades.

1998 U.S.A. Thurston High School Shootings

1998 : After shooting and killing his parents the day before student Kipland "Kip" Kinkel a 15-year-old student takes a .22 caliber rifle, a .22 caliber handgun, and a 9mm Glock semi-automatic pistol to Thurston High School in Springfield, Ore., where he murders two classmates, Ben Walker and Mikael Nicklauson, and injured 25 others.

2005 Montenegro Votes for Independence

2005 : Voters in Montenegro voted to secede from their union with Serbia. The voter turnout was over eighty-five percent, with 55.4% of voters in favor of independence from Serbia. The secession would have drastic economic and social consequences for both Serbia and Montenegro, and if Montenegro were to become independent it would mark the first time since the end World War I that it was an independent nation.

1926 Hoover Electric Cleaner

What I loved about this is that it is a Real Hoover ( the generic name often used for a vacuum cleaner ) and the tag line , I can remember as a kid back in the late 50's over 30 years later the Hoover Tag Line for selling was "It Beats as it Sweeps as it Cleans"

Electric Light Bulb

Electricity although used by more and more left many of it's mysteries unexplained, one of those was how a light bulb produced so much light, this advert by General Electric explained that a useless gas named Argon ( Coming from two Greek words meaning doesn't work ) discovered in 1894 was now pumped into the modern light bulb and provided a first class light.

2009 Accused Witches Burned in Kenya

2009 : Eleven people accused of being witches were burned to death in Kenya. Villagers formed a mob and attacked the elderly people, eventually killing the eight women and three men who were all over the age of eighty.

2010 US Scientists Create Artificial Life

2010 : Scientists in the United States successfully created artificial life by creating the first live cell to be controlled by synthetic DNA.

2011 Iceland Grimsvotn Volcano Begins Erupting

2011 : The most active volcano in Iceland, Grimsvotn, began erupting according to scientists. The volcano last erupted in 2004 and is located under the Vatnajokull glacier in the southeastern part of Iceland. The eruption was expected to produce ash plumes that would possibly disrupt air travel in the area, which had already been banned.

2012 Mali President Attacked by Protesters

2012 : Dioncounda Traore, the interim president of Mali, was beaten up by protesters and was taken to the hospital for a head wound. People who had supported a coup that happened in March had gathered in massive protests after a deal was made that would keep Traore in power for another year.

2013 Tunisian Man Killed by Coronavirus

2013 : A Tunisian man who had recently visited Saudi Arabia died after being infected with the new deadly coronavirus (NCoV). This was though to be the first case of the virus in Africa. At this point only forty-one cases had been reported worldwide and of those forty-one, twenty had died from the virus.


Day 121 May 20, 2011 - History

There is a wealth daily holidays and special days. Some are steeped in tradition, while others may be wacky, bizarre, unique, special or otherwise simply different holidays. Looking for a wacky day to celebrate, perhaps?

Click on the month below to see our daily collection for the month. There is a special day for just about everyone and everything.

January February March
April May June
July August September
October November December

People often inquire about creating a day. How does one go about doing it? Find out now!

Garden Hobbies Home gardening tips and advice for all of your plants, flowers, vegetables, herbs, organics, shade gardens, indoor houseplants, and more.

1. 2021 dates are available later in 2020.

2. Holiday Insights is one of the original holiday calendar sites. We are proudly one of very few who actually researches each holiday and special day prior to publishing them.

Holiday Insights, where everyday is a holiday, a bizarre day, a wacky day ,or a special event. Join us in the fun each and every day of the year.


13 CFR § 121.103 - How does SBA determine affiliation?

(1) Concerns and entities are affiliates of each other when one controls or has the power to control the other, or a third party or parties controls or has the power to control both. It does not matter whether control is exercised, so long as the power to control exists.

(2) SBA considers factors such as ownership, management, previous relationships with or ties to another concern, and contractual relationships, in determining whether affiliation exists.

(3) Control may be affirmative or negative. Negative control includes, but is not limited to, instances where a minority shareholder has the ability, under the concern's charter, by-laws, or shareholder's agreement, to prevent a quorum or otherwise block action by the board of directors or shareholders.

(4) Affiliation may be found where an individual, concern, or entity exercises control indirectly through a third party.

(5) In determining whether affiliation exists, SBA will consider the totality of the circumstances, and may find affiliation even though no single factor is sufficient to constitute affiliation.

(6) In determining the concern's size, SBA counts the receipts, employees, or other measure of size of the concern whose size is at issue and all of its domestic and foreign affiliates, regardless of whether the affiliates are organized for profit.

(7) For SBA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs, the bases for affiliation are set forth in § 121.702.

(8) For applicants in SBA's Business Loan, Disaster Loan, and Surety Bond Guarantee Programs, the size standards and bases for affiliation are set forth in § 121.301.

(b) Exceptions to affiliation coverage.

(1) Business concerns owned in whole or substantial part by investment companies licensed, or development companies qualifying, under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended, are not considered affiliates of such investment companies or development companies.

(i) Business concerns owned and controlled by Indian Tribes, Alaska Native Corporations (ANCs) organized pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq. ), Native Hawaiian Organizations (NHOs), Community Development Corporations (CDCs) authorized by 42 U.S.C. 9805, or wholly-owned entities of Indian Tribes, ANCs, NHOs, or CDCs are not considered affiliates of such entities.

(ii) Business concerns owned and controlled by Indian Tribes, ANCs, NHOs, CDCs, or wholly-owned entities of Indian Tribes, ANCs, NHOs, or CDCs, are not considered to be affiliated with other concerns owned by these entities because of their common ownership or common management. In addition, affiliation will not be found based upon the performance of common administrative services so long as adequate payment is provided for those services. Affiliation may be found for other reasons.

(A) Common administrative services which are subject to the exception to affiliation include, bookkeeping, payroll, recruiting, other human resource support, cleaning services, and other duties which are otherwise unrelated to contract performance or management and can be reasonably pooled or otherwise performed by a holding company, parent entity, or sister business concern without interfering with the control of the subject firm.

(B) Contract administration services include both services that could be considered “common administrative services” under the exception to affiliation and those that could not.

(1) Contract administration services that encompass actual and direct day-to-day oversight and control of the performance of a contract/project are not shared common administrative services, and would include tasks or functions such as negotiating directly with the government agency regarding proposal terms, contract terms, scope and modifications, project scheduling, hiring and firing of employees, and overall responsibility for the day-to-day and overall project and contract completion.

(2) Contract administration services that are administrative in nature may constitute administrative services that can be shared, and would fall within the exception to affiliation. These administrative services include tasks such as record retention not related to a specific contract ( e.g., employee time and attendance records), maintenance of databases for awarded contracts, monitoring for regulatory compliance, template development, and assisting accounting with invoice preparation as needed.

(C) Business development may include both services that could be considered “common administrative services” under the exception to affiliation and those that could not. Efforts at the holding company or parent level to identify possible procurement opportunities for specific subsidiary companies may properly be considered “common administrative services” under the exception to affiliation. However, at some point the opportunity identified by the holding company's or parent entity's business development efforts becomes concrete enough to assign to a subsidiary and at that point the subsidiary must be involved in the business development efforts for such opportunity. At the proposal or bid preparation stage of business development, the appropriate subsidiary company for the opportunity has been identified and a representative of that company must be involved in preparing an appropriate offer. This does not mean to imply that one or more representatives of a holding company or parent entity cannot also be involved in preparing an offer. They may be involved in assisting with preparing the generic part of an offer, but the specific subsidiary that intends to ultimately perform the contract must control the technical and contract specific portions of preparing an offer. In addition, once award is made, employee assignments and the logistics for contract performance must be controlled by the specific subsidiary company and should not be performed at a holding company or parent entity level.

(3) Business concerns which are part of an SBA approved pool of concerns for a joint program of research and development or for defense production as authorized by the Small Business Act are not affiliates of one another because of the pool.

(4) Business concerns which lease employees from concerns primarily engaged in leasing employees to other businesses or which enter into a co-employer arrangement with a Professional Employer Organization (PEO) are not affiliated with the leasing company or PEO solely on the basis of a leasing agreement.

(5) For financial, management or technical assistance under the Small Business Investment Act of 1958, as amended, (an applicant is not affiliated with the investors listed in paragraphs (b)(5) (i) through (vi) of this section.

(i) Venture capital operating companies, as defined in the U.S. Department of Labor regulations found at 29 CFR 2510.3-101(d)

(ii) Employee benefit or pension plans established and maintained by the Federal government or any state, or their political subdivisions, or any agency or instrumentality thereof, for the benefit of employees

(iii) Employee benefit or pension plans within the meaning of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (29 U.S.C. 1001, et seq. )

(iv) Charitable trusts, foundations, endowments, or similar organizations exempt from Federal income taxation under section 501(c) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (26 U.S.C. 501(c))

(v) Investment companies registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (1940 Act) (15 U.S.C. 80a-1, et seq. ) and

(vi) Investment companies, as defined under the 1940 Act, which are not registered under the 1940 Act because they are beneficially owned by less than 100 persons, if the company's sales literature or organizational documents indicate that its principal purpose is investment in securities rather than the operation of commercial enterprises.

(6) A firm that has an SBA-approved mentor-protégé agreement authorized under § 125.9 of this chapter is not affiliated with its mentor or protégé firm solely because the protégé firm receives assistance from the mentor under the agreement. Similarly, a protégé firm is not affiliated with its mentor solely because the protégé firm receives assistance from the mentor under a federal mentor-protégé program where an exception to affiliation is specifically authorized by statute or by SBA under the procedures set forth in § 121.903. Affiliation may be found in either case for other reasons as set forth in this section.

(7) The member shareholders of a small agricultural cooperative, as defined in the Agricultural Marketing Act (12 U.S.C. 1141j), are not considered affiliated with the cooperative by virtue of their membership in the cooperative.

(8) These exceptions to affiliation and any others set forth in § 121.702 apply for purposes of SBA's SBIR and STTR programs.

(9) In the case of a solicitation for a bundled contract or a Multiple Award Contract with a value in excess of the agency's substantial bundling threshold, a small business contractor may enter into a Small Business Teaming Arrangement with one or more small business subcontractors and submit an offer as a small business without regard to affiliation, so long as each team member is small for the size standard assigned to the contract or subcontract. The agency shall evaluate the offer in the same manner as other offers with due consideration of the capabilities of the subcontractors.

(i) The relationship of a faith-based organization to another organization is not considered an affiliation with the other organization under this subpart if the relationship is based on a religious teaching or belief or otherwise constitutes a part of the exercise of religion. In addition, the eligibility criteria set forth in 15 U.S.C. 636(a)(36)(D) are satisfied for any faith-based organization having not more than 500 employees (including individuals employed on a full-time, part-time, or other basis) that pays Federal payroll taxes using its own Internal Revenue Service Employer Identification Number (EIN) or that would support a deduction under the second sentence of 26 U.S.C. 512(b)(12) if the organization generated unrelated business taxable income. For purposes of this paragraph (b)(10), the term “faith-based organization” includes, but is not limited to, any organization associated with a church or convention or association of churches within the meaning of 26 U.S.C. 414(e)(3)(D). The term “organization” has the meaning given in 26 U.S.C. 414(m)(6)(A). The terms “church” and “convention or association of churches” have the same meaning that they have in 26 U.S.C. 414.

(ii) No specific process or filing is necessary to claim the benefit of the exemption in paragraph (b)(10)(i) of this section. In applying for a loan under the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), a faith-based organization may make all necessary certifications with respect to common ownership or management or other eligibility criteria based upon affiliation, if the organization would be an eligible borrower but for application of SBA affiliation rules and if the organization falls within the terms of the exemption described in paragraph (b)(10)(i) of this section. If a faith-based organization indicates any relationship that may pertain to affiliation, such as ownership of, ownership by, or common management with any other organization, on or in connection with a loan application, and if the faith-based organization applying for a loan falls within the terms of the exemption described in paragraph (b)(10)(i) of this section with respect to that relationship, the faith-based organization may indicate on a separate sheet that it is entitled to the exemption. That sheet may be identified as addendum A, and no further listing of the other organization or description of the relationship to that organization is required. See appendix A to this part for a sample “Addendum A”, but the format need not be used as long as the substance is the same.

(c) Affiliation based on stock ownership.

(1) A person (including any individual, concern or other entity) that owns, or has the power to control, 50 percent or more of a concern's voting stock, or a block of voting stock which is large compared to other outstanding blocks of voting stock, controls or has the power to control the concern.

(2) If two or more persons (including any individual, concern or other entity) each owns, controls, or has the power to control less than 50 percent of a concern's voting stock, and such minority holdings are equal or approximately equal in size, and the aggregate of these minority holdings is large as compared with any other stock holding, SBA presumes that each such person controls or has the power to control the concern whose size is at issue. This presumption may be rebutted by a showing that such control or power to control does not in fact exist.

(3) If a concern's voting stock is widely held and no single block of stock is large as compared with all other stock holdings, the concern's Board of Directors and CEO or President will be deemed to have the power to control the concern in the absence of evidence to the contrary.

(d) Affiliation arising under stock options, convertible securities, and agreements to merge.

(1) In determining size, SBA considers stock options, convertible securities, and agreements to merge (including agreements in principle) to have a present effect on the power to control a concern. SBA treats such options, convertible securities, and agreements as though the rights granted have been exercised.

(2) Agreements to open or continue negotiations towards the possibility of a merger or a sale of stock at some later date are not considered “agreements in principle” and are thus not given present effect.

(3) Options, convertible securities, and agreements that are subject to conditions precedent which are incapable of fulfillment, speculative, conjectural, or unenforceable under state or Federal law, or where the probability of the transaction (or exercise of the rights) occurring is shown to be extremely remote, are not given present effect.

(4) An individual, concern or other entity that controls one or more other concerns cannot use options, convertible securities, or agreements to appear to terminate such control before actually doing so. SBA will not give present effect to individuals', concerns' or other entities' ability to divest all or part of their ownership interest in order to avoid a finding of affiliation.

(e) Affiliation based on common management. Affiliation arises where one or more officers, directors, managing members, or partners who control the board of directors and/or management of one concern also control the board of directors or management of one or more other concerns.

(f) Affiliation based on identity of interest. Affiliation may arise among two or more persons with an identity of interest. Individuals or firms that have identical or substantially identical business or economic interests (such as family members, individuals or firms with common investments, or firms that are economically dependent through contractual or other relationships) may be treated as one party with such interests aggregated. Where SBA determines that such interests should be aggregated, an individual or firm may rebut that determination with evidence showing that the interests deemed to be one are in fact separate.

(1) Firms owned or controlled by married couples, parties to a civil union, parents, children, and siblings are presumed to be affiliated with each other if they conduct business with each other, such as subcontracts or joint ventures or share or provide loans, resources, equipment, locations or employees with one another. This presumption may be overcome by showing a clear line of fracture between the concerns. Other types of familial relationships are not grounds for affiliation on family relationships.

(2) SBA may presume an identity of interest based upon economic dependence if the concern in question derived 70% or more of its receipts from another concern over the previous three fiscal years.

(i) This presumption may be rebutted by a showing that despite the contractual relations with another concern, the concern at issue is not solely dependent on that other concern, such as where the concern has been in business for a short amount of time and has only been able to secure a limited number of contracts or where the contractual relations do not restrict the concern in question from selling the same type of products or services to another purchaser.

(ii) A business concern owned and controlled by an Indian Tribe, ANC, NHO, CDC, or by a wholly-owned entity of an Indian Tribe, ANC, NHO, or CDC, is not considered to be affiliated with another concern owned by that entity based solely on the contractual relations between the two concerns.

(g) Affiliation based on the newly organized concern rule. Except as provided in § 124.109(c)(4)(iii), affiliation may arise where former or current officers, directors, principal stockholders, managing members, or key employees of one concern organize a new concern in the same or related industry or field of operation, and serve as the new concern's officers, directors, principal stockholders, managing members, or key employees, and the one concern is furnishing or will furnish the new concern with contracts, financial or technical assistance, indemnification on bid or performance bonds, and/or other facilities, whether for a fee or otherwise. A concern may rebut such an affiliation determination by demonstrating a clear line of fracture between the two concerns. A “key employee” is an employee who, because of his/her position in the concern, has a critical influence in or substantive control over the operations or management of the concern.

(h) Affiliation based on joint ventures. A joint venture is an association of individuals and/or concerns with interests in any degree or proportion intending to engage in and carry out business ventures for joint profit over a two year period, for which purpose they combine their efforts, property, money, skill, or knowledge, but not on a continuing or permanent basis for conducting business generally. This means that a specific joint venture entity generally may not be awarded contracts beyond a two-year period, starting from the date of the award of the first contract, without the partners to the joint venture being deemed affiliated for the joint venture. Once a joint venture receives a contract, it may submit additional offers for a period of two years from the date of that first award. An individual joint venture may be awarded one or more contracts after that two-year period as long as it submitted an offer including price prior to the end of that two-year period. SBA will find joint venture partners to be affiliated, and thus will aggregate their receipts and/or employees in determining the size of the joint venture for all small business programs, where the joint venture submits an offer after two years from the date of the first award. The same two (or more) entities may create additional joint ventures, and each new joint venture entity may submit offers for a period of two years from the date of the first contract to the joint venture without the partners to the joint venture being deemed affiliates. At some point, however, such a longstanding inter-relationship or contractual dependence between the same joint venture partners will lead to a finding of general affiliation between and among them. A joint venture: Must be in writing must do business under its own name and be identified as a joint venture in the System for Award Management (SAM) for the award of a prime contract may be in the form of a formal or informal partnership or exist as a separate limited liability company or other separate legal entity and, if it exists as a formal separate legal entity, may not be populated with individuals intended to perform contracts awarded to the joint venture ( i.e., the joint venture may have its own separate employees to perform administrative functions, including one or more Facility Security Officer(s), but may not have its own separate employees to perform contracts awarded to the joint venture). SBA may also determine that the relationship between a prime contractor and its subcontractor is a joint venture pursuant to paragraph (h)(2). For purposes of this paragraph (h), contract refers to prime contracts, novations of prime contracts, and any subcontract in which the joint venture is treated as a similarly situated entity as the term is defined in part 125 of this chapter.

(i) A joint venture of two or more business concerns may submit an offer as a small business for a Federal procurement, subcontract or sale so long as each concern is small under the size standard corresponding to the NAICS code assigned to the contract. For a competitive 8(a) procurement, a joint venture between an 8(a) Participant and one or more other small business concerns (including two firms approved by SBA to be a mentor and protégé under § 125.9 of this chapter) must also meet the requirements of § 124.513(c) and (d) of this chapter as of the date of the final proposal revision for negotiated acquisitions and final bid for sealed bidding in order to be eligible for award.

(ii) Two firms approved by SBA to be a mentor and protégé under § 125.9 of this chapter may joint venture as a small business for any Federal government prime contract or subcontract, provided the protégé qualifies as small for the size standard corresponding to the NAICS code assigned to the procurement, and the joint venture meets the requirements of § 124.513 (c) and (d), § 125.8(b) and (c), § 125.18(b)(2) and (3), § 126.616(c) and (d), or § 127.506(c) and (d) of this chapter, as appropriate. Except for sole source 8(a) awards, the joint venture must meet the requirements of § 124.513(c) and (d), § 125.8(b) and (c), § 125.18(b)(2) and (3), § 126.616(c) and (d), or § 127.506(c) and (d) of this chapter, as appropriate, as of the date of the final proposal revision for negotiated acquisitions and final bid for sealed bidding. For a sole source 8(a) award, the joint venture must demonstrate that it meets the requirements of § 124.513(c) and (d) prior to the award of the contract.

(2) Ostensible subcontractors. A contractor and its ostensible subcontractor are treated as joint venturers for size determination purposes. An ostensible subcontractor is a subcontractor that is not a similarly situated entity, as that term is defined in § 125.1 of this chapter, and performs primary and vital requirements of a contract, or of an order, or is a subcontractor upon which the prime contractor is unusually reliant. All aspects of the relationship between the prime and subcontractor are considered, including, but not limited to, the terms of the proposal (such as contract management, technical responsibilities, and the percentage of subcontracted work), agreements between the prime and subcontractor (such as bonding assistance or the teaming agreement), and whether the subcontractor is the incumbent contractor and is ineligible to submit a proposal because it exceeds the applicable size standard for that solicitation.

(3) Receipts/employees attributable to joint venture partners. For size purposes, a concern must include in its receipts its proportionate share of joint venture receipts, unless the proportionate share already is accounted for in receipts reflecting transactions between the concern and its joint ventures ( e.g., subcontracts from a joint venture entity to joint venture partners). In determining the number of employees, a concern must include in its total number of employees its proportionate share of joint venture employees. For the calculation of receipts, the appropriate proportionate share is the same percentage of receipts or employees as the joint venture partner's percentage share of the work performed by the joint venture. For the calculation of employees, the appropriate share is the same percentage of employees as the joint venture partner's percentage ownership share in the joint venture, after first subtracting any joint venture employee already accounted for in one of the partner's employee count.

(4) Facility security clearances. A joint venture may be awarded a contract requiring a facility security clearance where either the joint venture itself or the individual partner(s) to the joint venture that will perform the necessary security work has (have) a facility security clearance.

(i) Where a facility security clearance is required to perform primary and vital requirements of a contract, the lead small business partner to the joint venture must possess the required facility security clearance.

(ii) Where the security portion of the contract requiring a facility security clearance is ancillary to the principal purpose of the procurement, the partner to the joint venture that will perform that work must possess the required facility security clearance.


National Sorry Day: An important part of healing

National Sorry Day is held on 26 May each year to acknowledge and recognise members of the Stolen Generations. Charles Passi, a Dauareb tribesman from the Mer Island group in the Torres Straits, and Chair of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Healing Foundation shares his thoughts on the importance of National Sorry Day.

National Sorry Day is important to us as an organisation, but also to us as Australia’s First Peoples because we use it to remember and recognise our Stolen Generations. Most Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people I know have been affected either directly or indirectly by this terrible part of our history since European colonisation. With no disrespect intended, I am a strong advocate for turning our hurt from the past into something positive for our community and for our future generations, as a sign of taking our destiny into our own hands. That’s why I was very happy to hear the recommendation from the Bringing Them Home report (tabled in Federal Parliament on 26 May 1997) that a National Sorry Day be celebrated each year. And that’s what we’ve been doing since 1998. I see this as a positive contribution to our healing journey, just as the national Apology was five years ago.

At the Healing Foundation, we are dedicated to supporting the healing of Stolen Generations and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities around Australia. We see healing as a process of returning to our physical, emotional, spiritual and cultural wellbeing. It’s a journey that can happen over a long time and that’s understandable given the profound and damaging effects that forced removal has had on peoples’ lives. As our brothers and sisters over at Reconciliation Australia know, recognition is a big part of healing.

So that’s why National Sorry Day isn’t just another one of ‘those days’ for me. To celebrate it this year I’m going to take part in the Sorry Day Bridge Walk in Canberra, led by the deadly mob at Winnunga Health Service, on 24 May. I hope all Australians, whether they’ve been here for generations or just a short time, will take a quiet or (loud) moment to recognise our Stolen Generations on 26 May.


Papa John's International, Inc. (PZZA)

The restaurant industry, represented by the Dow Jones U.S. Restaurants & Bars Index, has underperformed the broader market with a total return of 24.8% over the past 12 months, as of June 8, 2021. By comparison, the Russell 1000's total return over the same period is 34.8%. Here are the top 3 restaurant stocks with best value, fastest growth, and most momentum.

Place A Bag On Your Car Mirror When Traveling

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Papa John's (PZZA) Rides On Solid Comps Growth, Debts High

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Wendy's just became the first fast-food meme stock — but there is a catch

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McDonald's automated drive-thru is just the latest sign of robots taking over fast-food

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Mom's Payback - She Bought Neighbor's Property

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Chipotle's infamous long lines are back: CEO Brian Niccol

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The Pizza Business Is Divided on Delivery

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When Should You Buy Papa John's International, Inc. (NASDAQ:PZZA)?

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Why McDonald's minimum wage hike is surprisingly good news for the stock

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Wendy's new breakfast menu fires up same-store sales

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Papa John's (PZZA) Banks on Expansion Initiatives, Costs High

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Papa John's to repurchase some of Starboard's stake, which is being converted to common stock

Papa John's International Inc. said Wednesday that Starboard Value L.P.'s investment in preferred shares will converted to common stock, with the pizza seller repurchasing 31% of the preferred shares before the conversion. In 2019, Starboard had invested $250 million in Papa John's Series B convertible preferred stock with a total yield of about 5.4%, which were convertible to common stock at Starboard's option at a conversion price of $50.06. The stock closed Tuesday 93.8% above the conversion price at $97.01. At the time of the investment, Starboard's stake on a as-converted basis represented about 13.2% of the outstanding common stock. With Papa John's repurchase of preferred shares, Starboard's stake will be about 9.5% of the outstanding common stock. After the repurchase and conversion, the number of outstanding shares will increase by 3.5 million shares. The company will record a $110 million charge as a result of the transactions. Papa John's stock, which was still inactive in premarket trading, has lost 11.1% over the past three months, while the S&P 500 has gained 5.5%.

Papa John’s Announces Repurchase and Conversion of All Convertible Preferred Stock Owned by Starboard Value LP

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Papa John's (PZZA) Surges 7.3%: Is This an Indication of Further Gains?

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More Americans Now Double-Stuffed

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Papa John's (PZZA) Q1 Revenues Beat Estimates, Increase Y/Y

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Papa John's eats analysts' profit forecasts for lunch thanks to this epic new pizza

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Papa John's International Inc (PZZA) Q1 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

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Papa John's (PZZA) Surpasses Q1 Earnings and Revenue Estimates

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Papa John's Earnings Top Expectations, Shares Rise Sharply

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Papa John's Epic Stuffed Crust pizza drives sales growth

Papa John's International Inc. shares rose 4.2% in Thursday premarket trading after the pizza delivery company reported first-quarter earnings and revenue that beat expectations. Net income totaled $27.1 million, or 82 cents per share, up from $8.4 million, or 15 cents per share, last year. Adjusted EPS of 90 cents beat the FactSet consensus for 56 cents. Revenue of $511.7 million was up from $409.9 million last year and ahead of the FactSet consensus for $470.0 million. Comparable sales in North America grew 26.2% and were up 23.2% on an international basis. Papa John's attributed the growth to the new Epic Stuffed Crust pizza in North America and the company's expanding customer base. The FactSet consensus was for domestic comparable sales growth of 14.9% and international growth of 17.4%. Papa John's stock has gained 10.8% for the year to date while the S&P 500 index is up 11% for the period.

Papa John’s Announces First Quarter 2021 Financial Results

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Papa John's International, Inc. to Host Earnings Call

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Papa John's (PZZA) Reports Next Week: Wall Street Expects Earnings Growth

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Papa John’s Announces Quarterly Dividend

Papa John’s International, Inc. (NASDAQ: PZZA) today announced that the Board of Directors has declared a quarterly dividend of .225 per common share, payable May 21, 2021, to shareholders of record at the close of business on May 11, 2021. At this quarterly dividend rate, the annual dividend is equivalent to .90 per common share.


Background

Solidarity is identified in the Millennium Declaration as one of the fundamental values of international relations in the 21st Century, wherein those, who either suffer or benefit least deserve help from those who benefit most. Consequently, in the context of globalization and the challenge of growing inequality, strengthening of international solidarity is indispensable.

Therefore, the UN General Assembly, convinced that the promotion of the culture of solidarity and the spirit of sharing is important for combating poverty, proclaimed 20 of December as International Human Solidarity Day.

Through initiatives such as the establishment of the World Solidarity Fund to eradicate poverty and the proclamation of International Human Solidarity Day, the concept of solidarity was promoted as crucial in the fight against poverty and in the involvement of all relevant stakeholders.

The UN and the Concept of Solidarity

The concept of solidarity has defined the work of the United Nations since the birth of the Organization. The creation of the United Nations drew the peoples and nations of the world together to promote peace, human rights and social and economic development. The Organization was founded on the basic premise of unity and harmony among its members, expressed in the concept of collective security that relies on the solidarity of its members to unite “to maintain international peace and security.”

It is in the spirit of solidarity that the Organization relies on “cooperation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural or humanitarian character” as well.

The General Assembly, on 22 December 2005, by resolution 60/209 identified solidarity as one of the fundamental and universal values that should underlie relations between peoples in the twenty-first century, and in that regard decided to proclaim 20 December of each year International Human Solidarity Day.

By resolution 57/265 the General Assembly, on 20 December 2002, established the World Solidarity Fund, which was set up in February 2003 as a trust fund of the United Nations Development Programme. Its objective is to eradicate poverty and promote human and social development in developing countries, in particular among the poorest segments of their populations.


Countries that celebrate Mother’s Day

Most countries around the world celebrate Mother’s Day including most of Europe, Asia, Australia, New Zealand, India, and Japan on the second Monday of May. Many Arab countries like Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and more celebrate Mother’s Day on March 21 (spring equinox). Some countries like United Kingdom and Ireland and others celebrate the Day on the fourth Sunday during Lent and call it Mothering Sunday. Many eastern and southern Eurasian countries including Russia celebrate Mother’s Day together with International Women’s Day on March 8th. Mother’s Day celebrations around the world details on Wikipedia.

Mother’s Day celebrated its 100 year anniversary in 2014. In the year 1914, President Woodrow Wilson signed into law Mother’s Day stating that the Day would be celebrated on the second Sunday of May and be a national holiday [1].

The most popular gifts/ideas to give for Mother’s Day in order of popularity are 1) Greeting Cards, 2) Flowers, 3) Special outings, 4) Clothing and accessories, and 5) Jewelry [2]. Many mothers like a phone call or hugs and kisses as well.


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Logos were compiled by the amazing SportsLogos.net.

Copyright © 2000-2021 Sports Reference LLC. All rights reserved.

Much of the play-by-play, game results, and transaction information both shown and used to create certain data sets was obtained free of charge from and is copyrighted by RetroSheet.

Win Expectancy, Run Expectancy, and Leverage Index calculations provided by Tom Tango of InsideTheBook.com, and co-author of The Book: Playing the Percentages in Baseball.

Total Zone Rating and initial framework for Wins above Replacement calculations provided by Sean Smith.

Full-year historical Major League statistics provided by Pete Palmer and Gary Gillette of Hidden Game Sports.

Some defensive statistics Copyright © Baseball Info Solutions, 2010-2021.

Some high school data is courtesy David McWater.

Many historical player head shots courtesy of David Davis. Many thanks to him. All images are property the copyright holder and are displayed here for informational purposes only.


Watch the video: Today in History for May 20th


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