Roman Guard Dog Mosaic

Roman Guard Dog Mosaic



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Beware of the dog

Warning signs of this sort have been found in ancient Roman buildings such as the House of the Tragic Poet in Pompeii, which contains a mosaic with the caption cave canem (pronounced [ˈkaweː ˈkaneːm] ). Some suppose that these warnings may sometimes have been intended to prevent visitors from stepping upon small, delicate dogs of the Italian Greyhound type. [3]

Under English law, placing such a sign does not relieve the owner of responsibility for any harm which may come to people attacked by the dog. [4] [5] Where a company employs the services of a guard dog, the Chapter 50 of Guard Dogs Act 1975 requires "a notice containing a warning that a guard dog is present is clearly exhibited at each entrance to the premises." [6] In many cases, security signs integrate both CCTV warnings and Guard Dog warnings into the same signage. [7]

Philippians 3:2 is translated as "beware of the dogs" or "beware of dogs" in the King James Bible and many other editions. [8] For example:

Beware of dogs, beware of evil workers, beware of the concision.

This is often interpreted as a euphemism, bad people having been described as dogs in a number of previous biblical passages. [9] Nonetheless the yard signs are sometimes alluded to in reference to the passage. [10] [11] The use of such signs in the Roman world may have influenced the author of the passage, [12] and conversely the passage may have influenced the wording of the more modern yard signs. [13]

  1. ^ R Wright, RH Logie (1988), "How young house burglars choose targets", The Howard Journal of Criminal Justice, 27 (2): 92–104, doi:10.1111/j.1468-2311.1988.tb00608.x
  2. ^
  3. C Wilkinson (1998), "Deconstructing the fort", Journal of Australian Studies
  4. ^
  5. Cheryl S. Smith (2004), The Rosetta bone, pp. 10–11, ISBN978-0-7645-4421-7
  6. ^
  7. James Paterson (1877), Commentaries on the Liberty of the Subject and the Laws of England, p. 271
  8. ^
  9. Charles G. Addison, Horace Gray Wood (1876), A treatise on the law of torts, p. 285
  10. ^
  11. Participation, Expert. "Guard Dogs Act 1975". www.legislation.gov.uk . Retrieved 2019-08-17 .
  12. ^
  13. " " Site Security Sign". securitysignage.co.uk . Retrieved 2019-08-17 .
  14. ^◄ Philippians 3:2 ► Bible Hub
  15. ^Why to Beware of Dogs?
  16. ^Warning: Beware of Dogs
  17. ^Onward & Upward: Philippians 3:12-16
  18. ^The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament
  19. ^Beware of dogs

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History of the Cane Corso

The term “Cane Corso” is historically as much an adjective as it is a noun. It describes a type of dog you need to perform certain tasks, historically associated with this type of dog. There is documentation to support that as early as 1137 A.D. this term was synonymous with the lighter variety of the molossian dog. While the etymology of this term is open to debate, there are many valid hypotheses to its employment. Cane in Italian, even today means dog, a derivative of the Latin canis. Also in Latin, Cohors- this would mean bodyguard. Corsus, would be an ancient Italian provincial adjective which translates to sturdy or robust. The term however does not mean that the dog originates in Corsica. In the past this breed had been known by names with provincial connotations such as Dogo di Puglia. Cane Corso, however is a broader term that encompasses the breed’s diffusion throughout all of Italy and Sicily. The Cane Corso was so prized and held in such high regard that there are several metaphors and antidotes associated with its name "can corso, a man of proud aspect and attitude." "He bites worse than a cane Corso" “je’nu cors, is what an elderly peasant would say to describe a young man who was the essence of moral and physical virtue”

Ancient

The Cane Corso is morpo-functionally representative of hunting dogs down through history. Dogs employed helping man in the hunt can be seen in Assyrian bas-reliefs circa 700 BC. These dogs differ from the heavy dogs seen in Nivinah and Mesopotamia 100 or so years earlier. They have much tighter skin around the neck they present a much leggier construction with a retracted abdomen. In one scene these dogs are being restrained by their master’s while going to the hunt. In another scene the dogs are in full pursuit after wild stag with spears filling the air.

In antiquity dogs were not classified by rigid breed names but by the geographical location in which they were found or by their particular utilizations. The “Molossian” traces its roots to the Epirus, the ancient Greek state which is now modern day Albania. Of the Molossian Oppiano writes “not speedy but impetuous, a fighter of great courage and incredible strength, to be employed against bulls and wild boar, undaunted even when confronted with a Lion” The reigning Dynasty in the 4th century BC were called Molossians, of which Alexander the Greats mother was a Princess. The Molossians and Macedonians shared an alliance and undoubtedly that is where the Macedonian army procured their fierce some war dogs.

The Romans

The Romans first encountered these Molossians of Epirus during the Macedonian wars and renamed them Pugnaces because of their willingness to fight. As was the Roman way what they assimilated they improved upon. The Roman procurators cinogiae gathered up dogs from throughout the Empire and separated them into three categories celeres-those that ran down wild animals, pugnaces-those that attacked wild animals and villatici-those that guarded farms. These “groups” of dogs can be roughly translated into what would be modern day hounds, the Cane Corso and Neapolitan Mastiff respectively. This Roman war dog was used as an auxiliary to the legions, as a hunting dog and as entertainment in the arenas against all manner of animal and or human. To augment the Canis Pugnaces abilities, dogs from England were brought back to the Empire. The Romans met the pugnaces Britanniae in battle during their European campaign’s and had come to value their indomitable fighting spirit. These “imports” would be added to the Roman Pugnaces. It was said of the pugnaces Britanniae “they were inflamed with the spirit of Mars the god of war” Interestingly enough, many believe the infusion of the dogs from England are responsible for the undershot bite in the Cane Corso, it is also hypothesized that the Britanniae was originally a molossian that had been brought to England by the sea fairing Phoenicians.

The fall of Pax Romana

The fall of the Roman Empire predicated the fall of the Roman war dog. However, this was not the end for this type of dog he seemingly melted into the Italic landscape. While no longer the piriferi (It was common practice for the Romans to strap buckets of flaming oil to the backs of their war dogs and send them into the enemy’s front lines to disrupt the opposing cavalry, these dogs were called piriferi or fire bearer) he did find a home with the Italian country folk. This Roman dog was transformed from warrior to a somewhat more peaceful existence as a farmer, hunter and guardian. His mettle forged on the battlefield and so versatile, would now serve him well in these daunting tasks in the invaluable aid of man. This age is where we find the most interesting evidence of the Cane Corso type dog. A Roman mosaic depicting the wild boar hunt (Villa del Casale III-IV century a.d. Piazza Armerina) show’s a very Cane Corso like fawn dog. He is agile, tight skinned and sinewy, signature characteristics of the Cane Corso. Couple that with the fact that he is on a boar hunt, a traditional utilization of the Cane Corso. A miniature by Giovannino de Grassi (1390) shows a light, athletic Cane Corso type dog. The Reggia di Caserta, fountain of Diana (1790) the last two dogs on the left are dogs with cropped ears, retracted abdomen and long, lean musculature.

Neapolitan crèche (XVIII century) Figurine of a fawn Corso like dog with a black mask, again the black mask is an essential characteristic of the Cane Corso.

Around the 1100’s the term Cane Corso began to be associated the light molossian. This is evidenced in a number of areas

  • Giulio Cesare Scaligero (1484-1558) in his translation and commentary in Latin of Aristotle’s Storia degli animali, speaks of large dogs employed in the hunt of bulls and boar (once again historical Cane Corso utilizations) called Alani, Corsi, dogas.
  • Konrad von Gessner (1516-1564) In Historia Animalium, De Quadrupedibus, “ know that when a Corso has his teeth in a boar or bull he can’t be separated him without strong interference from the hunter on his jaws

Life on the farm

After the fall of the Roman Empire the Cane Corso proved its versatility by being employed in numerous varying tasks mostly in Southern Italy in provinces like Foggia, Puglia, Bari and Campobasso. The primary task’s where that of guardian, hunter and farm dog. The Cane Corso’s versatility made it an ideal farmhand. The Masseria or farm/manor was an almost self sufficient socio-economic culture. A series of structures positioned around in most cases a main building, generally a chapel. The Cane Corso was an essential tool in this environment. By day the Cane Corso was chained to guard the permanently stabled livestock, farm buildings and barns. This was necessary to protect the various merchants, butchers, day workers or occasional pedestrian who might pass by. In cases where there was more than one Cane Corso present, the chain was necessary to keep the confrontational dogs apart. The manner in which the dog was chained enabled him to have a free range of motion to be able to reach the areas he was entrusted to guard. This was accomplished by tying the chain to an aerial line and a pulley system. Particular attention was paid to the collar, which was often decorated with the family’s coat of arms.

He was well suited as a flock guardian, often deployed in the war with the wolves. In these times the Cane Corso often wore steel “Vraccale” collars that were equipped with spikes. These collars would ensure that the dog would have an advantage when he encountered the now extinct Italian wolf.

He was also utilized in the breeding of swine. The Cane Corso would become invaluable when after giving birth the sow would go to thicket to hide with her brood. The Corso’s job was to seek out and find the sow and incapacitate her either by grabbing her by the ear or snout so the farmer could safely gather up the litter. Once this was accomplished the dog was given a commanded to release her and the sow would anxiously follow her brood back to the farm where she was reunited with her piglets. The Cane Corso also was indispensable in keeping the boars under control. The semi wild boar endemic to the Italian south was a large and dangerous animal equipped with sharp tusks and nasty disposition. It was the agile and vigilant Cane Corsos job to intervene should the boar present a danger many a farmer was saved by the leap of the Cane Corso. The dog was sure to grab the swine by the ear or flank to incapacitate him, should the dog try and grab him at the snout the boar would be strong enough to run him to ground.

The Cane Corso was also used as a "cattle dog" or "butchers dog". The beef was raised in wild pastures until the time came for the cattle to be brought to slaughter by the "butteri" (the Italian cowboys). More often than not the herds would have to be driven great distances to be slaughtered. These were essentially "wild" animals and had to be treated with great caution. In order to keep the herd manageable the bulls had to separate, the Cane Corso accomplished this by using its vise like grip on the bull’s nose or ear the pain was so great that it completely incapacitated the bull. This practice became a popular attraction called "bull baiting" The Cane Corso of the butteri was charged with protecting the herd from predators both man and animal alike.

The Cane Corso also has a history as a hunter of large game. In southern Italy the wild boar was a valued food source. Hunting him was a dangerous proposition. Wild boars are equipped with sharp teeth and are capable of inflicting great harm to both man and dog when cornered. To hunt the boar a pack was made up of Cane Corso and industrial cross breeds developed for their sense of smell and pursuit abilities. The pack was released to chase and corner the boar until the hunter and with their Cane Corso’s arrived. The once unleashed the Cane Corso’s would set upon the swine, thus incapacitating him, leaving it to the hunter to dispatch the boar using a long spear. The badger was also considered prized game in the meridone (southern Italy) every part of the animal was used, from his bristles to his melted fat. Similarly to the boar, a pack was needed to hunt this nocturnal animal. Again, cross breeds were employed (generally the mother was a sent hound and the father a Cane Corso) the pack would flush out the quarry, once cornered the Cane Corso was set upon the badger knocking him to the ground and killing him with a bite to the neck. In Sicily the breed was used to hunt porcupine. The Cane Corso was sent to the rodent’s den to root him out, no easy task considering the quills of this animal are quite sharp and could easily blind the dog. The porcupine was hunted by day, being a nocturnal animal he lazily slept during daylight hours. The dogs used for this type of hunting were docked at the eight vertebrae instead of the fourth this was to ensure that the hunter would be able pull him out once he went to ground.

Decline

There are many variables that lead to the decline of the Cane Corso, his fortunes were however, invariably tied to the fortunes of the peoples of the meridone. The Masseria, the center of the socio-economic culture of the old south was in decline. The livestock that the Cane Corso was entrusted to control was shrinking as well as the game that he hunted was disappearing. The farms that remained had trended to modern more economical machines to do much of the beloved Cane Corso’s work. War impacted him as well during WW1 much of the populous of the south was called to arms, further weakening the agro-pastoral activities of the region. After the First World War there was a slight renaissance for the breed as things seemed to return to normal, but it was short lived. The onset of World War 2 again brought disarray to the regions rural activities, which were the Cane Corsos livelihood. All able bodied men were in the armed forces leaving pastoral activities to the woman and children. After the “war to end all wars” natural disasters such as flooding and landslides as well as poverty and food rations left the Cane Corso as an afterthought. Much of the returning work force chose to pursue other work opportunities in the north. Thus the golden age of the Cane Corso had come to a close.

Recovery of the Cane Corso

By the 1970’s the Cane Corso near extinction survived in only the most remote back woods regions of southern Italian hinterland. These peasants that still employed him and trained him in the traditional ways kept the remnants of the breed alive. But only sparsely, few old time dog men still remembered the proud sturdy dog of their youth. Their recollections more like faded memories of childhood dreams. One such man was SIG. Giovanni Bonnetti. In 1973 SIG Bonnetti contacted DR Poalo Breber when he learned that DR Breber would be working for a time in Foggia. SIG Bonnetti wrote DR Breber “he has noticed in those places a molossiod dog different hair from the Neapolitan Mastiff, similar to the bullmastiff, likeness of the Presa Majorca" the letter went on to say "Prof. Ballotta, eminent dog lover, inhabitant of Romagna, had seen several examples of this ancient Pugliese breed” With Breber’s interest peeked he began the search for this Ancient "molossiod" by seeking out Foggiani who’s memories went back some 50 years. These conversations led Breber various works of art, illustrations poems and other historical documentation depicting the utilization of the breed. By 1974 Breber had acquired a few specimens of the elusive breed and began to resuscitate the Cane Corso. Shortly thereafter DR Breber had the occasion to write an article in the ENCI’sI Nostri Cane magazine on his work with the Maremmano-Abruzzese in this article, two Cane Corso’s were pictured in the background. This picture drew the attention of 16-year-old student Stefano Gandolfi. Gandolfi sought out DR Breber to learn more about this ancient Pugliese breed of dog. Gandolfi soon enlisted the services of the Malavasi brothers from Mantova, who at the time bred German Sheppard dogs. DR Breber realizing that he was not a professional breeder, agreed the center of the recovery of the Cane Corso should be in Mantova. Breber sent a number of subjects up north to Mantova, most notably Dauno, a very typical large black dog. In Mantova, Dauno was bred to a bitch named Tipsi producing perhaps the most significant litter of Cane Corso’s in modern history. In this litter were Basir, the model for the standard of the Cane Corso and his sister Babak, chosen as the model of the feminine characteristics. In 1983 the chief proponents of the breed’s recovery form a breed club for the Cane Corso, the Society Amatori Cane Corso. By 1994 the Cane Corso receives official ENCI recognition by 1996 the breed receives FCI recognition.


The use of dogs in the Roman army?

I am aware of course that the Romans occasionally used creatures of a canine nature in war. However, I would like to know what role/s they actually performed in the army.

When were they first used by the Romans?

Were they used in battle or simply as sentries?

Were there permanent "dog regiments" within the Roman army?

Are there any historical examples where dogs played a key role in a campaign or battle?

I'd appreciate any respones!

Otranto

I haven't read about their use in battle, I'm curious about the responses.

I don't think attack dogs are practical in the confusion of battle. As we read in the news recently, when an intruder entered the White House, the Secret Service would not release their highly trained attack dogs because other agents were chasing the target. These are the best trained attack dogs in the United States, winning yearly awards, and still they could have mistakenly targeted the agents.

A more practical use would be to have guard dogs at the perimeter of a camp, to alarm them of strangers approaching.

The Rottweiler is said to be a descendent of the Roman war-dogs Rottweil itself being a Roman settlement (Arae Flaviae) with 5 forts of which a Legion [LEG XI Claudia] is attested by 41 brick stamps

Ancientgeezer



Modern Basenji (note the tail)


An Illyrian Mollosan war dog.

Victorian-era St Bernard, maybe a Mollosian descendent----maybe or maybe not.


CAVE CANEM!
Several cultures contemporary to Rome used war dogs, after all--almost all used hunting dogs, so dogs for scenting enemy, camp alarms, tracking and just companionship seem logical.
The Gauls and the Britons bred war dogs and the Britons exported both hunting and war dogs to Roman Europe even before the conquest. Ancient British War Dogs were trained to be aggressive and attack the foe in advance of the warrior and attack the hocks of enemy horses pulling chariots causing crashes and upsets.
Then as now Britons bred a variety of dogs in the Roman era, big mastiffs and yappy terriers.

However, I can find no reference of the Roman Legions having a Kappa-IX unit.

Lowell2

I am aware of course that the Romans occasionally used creatures of a canine nature in war. However, I would like to know what role/s they actually performed in the army.

When were they first used by the Romans?

Were they used in battle or simply as sentries?

Were there permanent "dog regiments" within the Roman army?

Are there any historical examples where dogs played a key role in a campaign or battle?

I'd appreciate any respones!

I've a similar thread (http://historum.com/ancient-history/73793-dogs-ancient-history.html
Dogs were used as messengers by the Greeks. Given their use in that role was sustained through WWI, it's likely the Romans employed them also, although I can't find a reference to it.
Guard dogs were used in the city and are documented in Pompeii (the failure of the guard dogs to bark while the geese gave an alert to attacking Gauls is a well known story that led to "sacred geese").

There's no references I've found to Romans using them in battle although Sumerians did. Dogs are not really useful in formation fighting. They are far more useful in skirmish fighting, as guards, messengers and sentries as well as incidentally controlling the livestock needed to feed the army and move the wagons.

Lowell2

I haven't read about their use in battle, I'm curious about the responses.

I don't think attack dogs are practical in the confusion of battle. As we read in the news recently, when an intruder entered the White House, the Secret Service would not release their highly trained attack dogs because other agents were chasing the target. These are the best trained attack dogs in the United States, winning yearly awards, and still they could have mistakenly targeted the agents.

A more practical use would be to have guard dogs at the perimeter of a camp, to alarm them of strangers approaching.

Attack dogs only go after "any moving target" if you haven't bothered to train them "us" vs "them". Any K9 in WWII was perfectly capable of discriminating between the Allies he worked with and the Germans or Japanese soldiers he (usually it was a male dog) was intended to detect and attack. Messenger dogs (WWI) were specifically trained to avoid the enemy and go to their known people. The fault is in training a dog to accept any handler. The police in Ghent, Belgium, who created the first official K9 police unit all used their own personal dogs -- dogs were not considered interchangeable equipment, which is the attitude in the post WWII US military and secret service.

But dogs are not "formation fighting" type tools. They'd have just got in the way of a legion in formation fighting with shields down and swords out. The forward scouts, however, would have found them just as invaluable as the GIs did in WWII.

Lowell2



Modern Basenji (note the tail)


An Illyrian Mollosan war dog.

Victorian-era St Bernard, maybe a Mollosian descendent----maybe or maybe not.


CAVE CANEM!
Several cultures contemporary to Rome used war dogs, after all--almost all used hunting dogs, so dogs for scenting enemy, camp alarms, tracking and just companionship seem logical.
The Gauls and the Britons bred war dogs and the Britons exported both hunting and war dogs to Roman Europe even before the conquest. Ancient British War Dogs were trained to be aggressive and attack the foe in advance of the warrior and attack the hocks of enemy horses pulling chariots causing crashes and upsets.
Then as now Britons bred a variety of dogs in the Roman era, big mastiffs and yappy terriers.

However, I can find no reference of the Roman Legions having a Kappa-IX unit.

Tenebrous

Arras

Caldrail

Mid-7th century BC: In the war waged by the Ephesians against Magnesia on the Maeander, the Magnesian horsemen were each accompanied by a war dog and a spear-bearing attendant. The dogs were released first and broke the enemy ranks, followed by an assault of spears, then a cavalry charge.[9] An epitaph records the burial of a Magnesian horseman named Hippaemon with his dog Lethargos, his horse, and his spearman.

525 BC: At the Battle of Pelusium, Cambyses II uses a psychological tactic against the Egyptians, arraying dogs and other animals in the front line to effectively take advantage of the Egyptian religious reverence for animals.

490 BC: At the Battle of Marathon, a dog follows his hoplite master into battle against the Persians and is memorialized in a mural.

480 BC: Xerxes I of Persia is accompanied by vast packs of Indian hounds when he invades Greece. They may have served in the military as well as being used for sport or hunting, but their purpose is unrecorded.

281 BC: Lysimachus is slain during the Battle of Corupedium and his body was discovered preserved on the battlefield and guarded vigilantly by his faithful dog.

231 BC: the Roman consul Marcus Pomponius Matho, leading the Roman legions through the inland of Sardinia, where the inhabitants led guerrilla warfare against the invaders, used "dogs from Italy" to hunt out the natives who tried to hide in the caves.

120 BC: Bituito, king of the Arvernii, attacked a small force of Romans led by the consul Fabius, using just the dogs he had in his army.


Roman Dog Names

Dogs should be called by names which are not very long, so that each may obey more quickly when he is called, but they should not have shorter names than those which are pronounced in two syllables.

_Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella

What did the ancient Romans name their four-legged best friends? Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella gives us a few recommended names in the section of his work on agriculture dealing with the rearing and training of dogs. Other likely sources used by the ancient Romans for dog names may have come from literature, in much the same way that people today draw on literature for naming their dogs.

Just as many a slave with a Greek name might be found in an ancient Roman household (with Greek names either originally belonging to the slaves or names fancifully taken from history and legend and bestowed by the masters), the Romans appeared also to have taken a shine to Greek names for their dogs, as illustrated by Columella. Perhaps they thought these Greek names sounded classier?

Presented here is a list of dog names in both Greek and Latin, as recorded by various Roman writers. Each name is followed by gender, meaning, cited source, and a brief, descriptive quote from that source.

Aello. f. "Whirlwind". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . fleet.

Agre. f. "Hunter". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . keen-scented.

Alce or Alke. f. "Might Valor". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Also, a recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Argiodus. m. "White-tooth". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . from a Cretan father and a Spartan mother.

Asbolos. m. "Soot". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . black.

Canache. f. "Gnasher". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Celer. m. "Speedy". A recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Cerva. f. "Hind". A recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Craugis. f. "Yapper". The puppy of a lonely wife, who claims the absent husband's share of the marital bed in Propertius' Elegies. "Even the fretful whimper of my puppy Craugis is pleasant to my ears she claims for herself your side in our bed."

Cyprius. m. "Cyprian". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . [Lycisce's] brother.

Dorceus. m. "Gazelle". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . Arcadian.

Dromas. m. "Runner". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Ferox. m. "Savage". A recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Harpalos. m. "Grasper". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . with a white spot in the middle of his black forehead.

Harpyia. f. "Seizer". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . with her two pups.

Hylactor. m. "Barker". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . shrill-tongued.

Hylaeus. m. "Sylvan". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . savage. but lately ripped up by a boar.

Hyrcanus. m. "From Hyrcania" (a region in ancient northern Persia, possibly meaning "land of the wolves"). Mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History to illustrate the faithfulness of dogs. . upon the funeral pile of King Lysimachus being lighted, threw itself into the flames.

Ichnobates. m. "Trail-follower". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . keen-scented. baying loud on the trail. a Cretan dog.

Issa. f. "Her Little Ladyship". An adored pup mentioned in one of Martial's epigrams (Book I, 109) . naughtier than Catullus' sparrow. more winning than any girl. If she whines, you will think she's talking.

Labros. m. "Fury". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . from a Cretan father and a Spartan mother.

Lachne. f. "Shaggy". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . shaggy.

Lacon or Lakon. m. "Spartan". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . renowned for strength. . Also, a recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Ladon. m."Catcher". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Sicyonian. thin in the flanks.

Laelaps. m. "Hurricane". A famous -- and relentless -- hunting hound in Ovid's Metamorphoses, originally a gift of the gods. She gave me. a wonderful hound which her own Cynthia had given, and said as she gave: "He will surpass all other hounds in speed.". No spear is swifter than he, nor leaden bullets thrown by a whirled sling, or the light reed shot from a Gortynian bow. Also, the name of one of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Leucon. m. "White". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . white-haired.

Lupa. f. "She-wolf". A recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Lycisce. f. "Wolf". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . swift.

Lydia. f. "From Lydia" (a region on the west coast of Asia Minor). A hunting hound and pet eulogized in one of Martial's epigrams (Book XI, 69). Reared among the trainers of the Amphitheater, a huntress, fierce in the woods, gentle in the house.

Margarita. f. "Pearl". From an ancient epitaph to a dog, cited in Abbott's work. . a great white hunting dog. who coursed through trackless forests. Also a puppy mentioned in Petronius' Satyricon, who gamely attacks a much larger dog. . an unnaturally obese black puppy.

Melampus. m. "Black-foot". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . a Spartan.

Melanchaetes. m. "Black-hair". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Melaneus. m. "Black". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Myia. f. "Fly" (the insect, a name perhaps given to a very small and active dog). From an ancient epitaph to a dog, cited in Abbott's work. . the little Gallic dog, barked fiercely if she found a rival lying in her mistress's lap.

Nape. f. "Glen". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . the wolf-dog.

Nebrophonos. m. "Fawn-killer". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . staunch.

Oresitrophos. m. "Mountaineer". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Oribasos. m. "Mountain-ranger". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . Arcadian.

Pamphagos or Pamphagus. m. "Voracious". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . Arcadian.

Patricus. m. "Noble". From an ancient epitaph to a dog, cited in Abbott's work. . an Italian dog, at Salernum. "My eyes were wet with tears, our dear little dog. In thy qualities, sagacious thou wert like a human being."

Perseus. m. The name of the dog of Aemilia Tertia, daughter of the 2nd century BCE Roman consul Lucius Aemilius Paullus Macedonicus. Legend has it that when Aemilia's father inquired as to why his daughter was in tears, she told him that "Perseus" (her dog) had just died. Because her father had just been given command of the Macedonian war against King Perseus, he took this as an omen of forthcoming success. The name "Perseus" is believed to be derived from the Greek word pertho, meaning "to destroy".

Poemenis. f. "Shepherd". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . the trusty shepherd.

Pterelas. m. "Winged". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . the swift of foot.

Pyrrhus. m. "Fire Flame-colored". A dog mentioned by Pliny the Elder in his Natural History to illustrate the faithfulness of dogs. . the dog of the tyrant Gelon.

Rome. f. "Strength". A recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Scylax or Skylax. m. "Puppy". In Petronius' Satyricon, the master Trimalchio claims that no one in his house loves him better than Scylax. . "the guardian of the house and the slaves". an enormous dog on a chain. Also a recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Spoude. f. "Zeal". A recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Sticte. f. "Spot". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Theridamas. m. "Beast-killer". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Theron. m. "Hunter". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses . fierce.

Thoos. m. "Swift". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses.

Tigris. m. or f. "Tiger Tigress". One of Actaeon's hounds in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Also, a recommended dog name in Columella's On Agriculture.

Dogs. are the only animals that will answer to their names, and recognize the voices of the family.


Roman Cane Corso Dogs and Puppies

Roman cane corso puppies are also very strong and are adopted into farms to protect the property as well as the livestock. In Italy, these dogs served to protect livestock from predators like wolves, and double-up as guard dogs protecting the homes. In the 1950s, this strong and sturdy dog came close to extinction, but was saved from doom by some really skillful animal lovers. Today, the Roman cane corso dog is chiefly seen as a human companion and a guard dog.


Gauls Foiled by Fowl

According to tradition, the Gauls meanwhile attempted to infiltrate the Capitoline Hill by stealth. At night, a small party scaled the hill near the Temple of Carmentis. The climb was precarious but the party gained the summit and completely eluded the Roman sentinels. The Gauls did not even wake the guard dogs. Fortunately for the Romans, a flock of sacred geese, near the temple of Juno, were in the vicinity of the Gallic infiltration. The geese put up such a racket that the Roman guard was finally roused. Led by a certain Marcus Manilus Capitolinus, a veteran soldier, those Gauls who had reached the summit were flung back over the cliff. Manilus confronted two of the enemy. His sword sliced away the right hand of one Gaul, sending a battle ax flying. Manilus smashed his shield into the face of the other, who tumbled down the cliff. The other Gauls, who still clung to the rocks, were dislodged with a volley of javelins and stones. The result of this fiasco was that stricter watch was kept by the Romans. The Gauls, too, tightened their security around the hill for they had come to realize that messages were passing between Veii and Rome.

Despite their valiant defense of the Capitol, the Roman condition was far from desirable. Seven months of blockade had reduced them to famine. The Gauls also suffered from malnutrition, along with severe outbreaks of malaria, and died in such great numbers that efforts were no longer made to bury the dead. The corpses were simply piled into heaps and burned.

Finally, hunger so gnawed at the defenders of the Capitol that they gave up any hope of being relieved by Camilus. All that was left was to sue for a peace. A conference between the consular Tribune Q. Sulpicious Longus and the Gallic chief Brennus resulted in a ransom of 1,000 pounds of gold to be paid by the Romans for the peaceful withdrawal of the Gauls. When it was time to weigh the gold the Gauls produced false weights. The Romans complained, but to no avail, for Brennus threw his own sword on the scales and haughtily proclaimed, “Woe to the vanquished.”


Roman Guard Dog Mosaic - History

Have you been KISSED by a Neo today? . Neapolitan Mastiffs - proof that God has a sense of humor . Check out the "Puppies" link to see our new arrivals . Neapolitan Mastiffs - the Giant Lap Dog .

Welcome to Clayton Hill Neo's

( Our) Neo History : While Neo's have been around for centuries (Roman Guard Dogs), we haven't had them here at Clayton Hill nearly that long. We stumbled on the breed quite by accident. We were out for a drive, and decided to 'check them out' - 4 hours later (it REALLY didn't look THAT far on the map) I fell in love. and we've been hooked ever since. And that's how Clayton Hill Neo's was born.

O ur Breeding Mission: Due to the Neo's size and innate guarding characteristics (and the fact that we have 4 young children), our goal in breeding is two-fold: temperament and appearance (health goes without saying - ask any breeder). What more can I tell you . I love the breed, want to do what I can to promote Neo's and educate people, - and I love puppies. But . we are not show dog folks. While I believe our pups certainly have show dog potential (as evidenced by the photo at right, ClaytonHills Mt Olympus), I don't presume to know enough about that area of dog ownership (not enough time right now). So, when we pick our Neo's for breeding, we are choosing dogs that please us (their looks) and have a great temperament.

Copyright © 2005-2018 Kris @ Clayton Hill Neos. All Rights Reserved.

Site designed by Kris @ Clayton Hill Neo's.


Roman Guard Dog Mosaic - History

Rome: Total War Discussion
Moderated by Terikel Grayhair , General Sajaru , Awesome Eagle

While I have been playing the Roman factions, I used the Roman Guard Dogs like I use elephants: To scare enemy cavalry. The problem is that is doesn't seem to work.

Does anybody know what they are for and how to use them?

I generally use them as kamikazes. Admittedly I don't use them that much but when I do they always seem to do okay. If you want to tie up an enemy unit for a minute or so or slow down an advance, use wardogs. Sure, they don't do that much damage and die pretty quickly, but unless the enemy react to them, they'll be marching with a load of angry dogs on their tail, slowly but surely picking them off one by one, so usually they end up fighting them.

Siege battles are good because they can clog up the streets, giving you extra time as a defender to prepare a last stand or as an attacker allowing your men to move unhindered towards the central plaza as the enemy will be too busy dealing with the dogs.

They are good against anything without too much armour. They will not in a battle by themselves, but rather just help the better units out, like if you send doggies forward then it stops enemy units dead in their tracks, so it will giv you time for all your legionaries to throw all their pila into the enemy.

Or for protecting against cavalry. If some cavalry are charging your rear but you can't move any units or have no spearmen, then send the doggies. It will stop the horsies and give you time for whatever you wish to do. this is usefull for multiplayer games because it is like dividing the enemy forces, and forcing one half(Cavalry) to be occupied for a small ammount of time.

Also, they can ran past the RED LINE OF UNCROSSABLE MAGIC. Meaning they can chase the enemy into the distance.

[This message has been edited by Liam_the_Spartan (edited 08-12-2011 @ 04:40 PM).]

My friend has taken quite nicely to War Dogs. He even makes armies of 15 Warbeasts, and then whatever he wants for the last 5 slots. He destroys most barbarian armies before the dogs die.

But yes, armor isn't the dogs friend. Against armor the dogs merely weaken the ones with armor for your other units to kill.

I am the Carthaginian who became an angel, and surrendered his wings for a life on the sea of battle.

My magic screen is constantly bombarded with nubile young things eager to please these old eyes. This truly is a wonderful period in which to exist! - Terikel the Deflowerer

Nulla ut Caseum Pellentesque
Nothing like a bit of cheese - Me

Mors Lator = Zoto888. In case I've ever mentioned that name.

My Gravatar is a response to Punic Hoplite's

I'm not 100% sure, but I think wardogs have the lowest upkeep from all units in rtw. If you don't mind the 2 turn building time it's an ideal unit to mass and use alongside peasants as garrison.

They also have another very good aspect, the dogs don't tire and will catch any unit in the end. Good to hunt down archers, skirmishers and routing generals.

"The difficulty is not so great to die for a friend, as to find a friend worth dying for." -Homer
"You see, this is what happens when you don't follow instructions, GKA. " -Edorix
Guild of the Skalds, Order of the Silver Quill, Apprentice Storyteller
Battle of Ilipa, 206BC - XI TWH Egil Skallagrimson Award

The word dyslexia was invented by Nazis to piss off kids with dyslexia.

Well, I would guess so. You know, "Civilian, what are you doing?"

"Nothing, I am just unhappy"

Seriously now, I don't think they are very good garrison, as they have low numbers.

[This message has been edited by Liam_the_Spartan (edited 08-13-2011 @ 12:07 PM).]

Warmutts are used as fire-anmd-forget missiles. Lock them on an enemy, order to attack, then go on about your business elsewhere. They will either destory the target and go on to the neaqrest enemy unit, or die. either away, you no longer control them.

In sieges they are excellent- for the defender. I like to keep one or two packs of mutts in my border villages. When attacked, sally with teh war mutts. The doggies go out, I turn them loose on enemy cavalry, then retreat the handlers back inside. I end up with a draw by battle's end, and the siege goes on- allowing me to sally again. I have broken many sieges like this- and my doggies were well-fed on horseflesh. Sometimes the foe will retreat rather than face more teeth.

Nulla ut Caseum Pellentesque
Nothing like a bit of cheese - Me

Mors Lator = Zoto888. In case I've ever mentioned that name.

My Gravatar is a response to Punic Hoplite's

The handlers deserve to have their manhoods mauled, their entrails tore out, and their throats ripped open by their own mutts.

The enemy handlers, that is, friendlies deserve their pick of the camp followers for having trained their beasts so well.

"The difficulty is not so great to die for a friend, as to find a friend worth dying for." -Homer
"You see, this is what happens when you don't follow instructions, GKA. " -Edorix
Guild of the Skalds, Order of the Silver Quill, Apprentice Storyteller
Battle of Ilipa, 206BC - XI TWH Egil Skallagrimson Award

The word dyslexia was invented by Nazis to piss off kids with dyslexia.

Nulla ut Caseum Pellentesque
Nothing like a bit of cheese - Me

Mors Lator = Zoto888. In case I've ever mentioned that name.

My Gravatar is a response to Punic Hoplite's

Just so you guys know, war dogs are the best siege units in the game, too. With one light cavalry and 10 doggie units, any huge city is yours for the taking. The enemy's full stack will inevitably sally forth against your pitiful army. When they do, make all your units withdraw ("W") until they are next to the edge of the map. fire-and-forget your war dogs, then withdraw their handlers off the map, and then spend the rest of the time walking/running your light cavalry around the map. War dogs can kill Spartans, sacred band, urbans, armored generals, and everything else as long as that unit is chasing light cavalry.

If you do lose the battle, your losses are minimal while the enemy will have taken huge casualties.

I love siccing the mutts on enemy cavalry units during sieges.

The horseborne fools ignore the dogs, who chew up mount after mount until the horses- and their riders- are all dead. Then they go on to the next unit, ususally infantry, and die like flies with full bellies.

Still, it is pleasurable to watch the enemy army disappear into the gullets of dogs, one by one.

Best thing for dogs is to watch them get thrown miles up into the air by armoured elephants

Other than that they are great for chasing enemies who may be routing off the map as they are not restricted by the red lines.

Dogs are also very useful when defending sieges. Let the dogs of the leash and they will take out whoever they can. As long as the handlers are unharmed, you can use them the next turn of the siege all over again. very handy at whittling away the enemy over a long siege.

You can also use dogs to tear into the back of an engaged phalanx to good effect.


2.Houston We Have A Mistake

Approximately 17% of Americans were watching on the morning of January 28, 1986, as the Space Shuttle Challenger launched toward space. On-board were 6 NASA astronauts, as well as Payload Specialist Christa McAuliffe, who was set to become the first teacher in space.

Tragedy struck just 72 seconds after liftoff. Gasses in the external fuel tank mixed, exploded, and tore the shuttle apart, killing all 7 crew members.

Prior to the disaster, the builder of the solid-rocket boosters, advised NASA that they believed the O-ring seals in the solid-rocket boosters could fail at extremely low temperatures. On the day of the launch, the temperature was 15 degrees colder than any previous launch in history.


Watch the video: How They Did It - Pet Dogs in Ancient Rome