USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, late 1945

USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, late 1945


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

US Navy Light Cruisers 1941-45, Mark Stille .Covers the five classes of US Navy light cruisers that saw service during the Second World War, with sections on their design, weaponry, radar, combat experience. Nicely organised, with the wartime service records separated out from the main text, so that the design history of the light cruisers flows nicely. Interesting to see how new roles had to be found for them, after other technology replaced them as reconnaissance aircraft [read full review]


Laststandonzombieisland

While The Big Easy gets all the attention when it comes to Mardi Gras, it should be pointed out that Mobile, Alabama, home to the Bienville-founded French colony around Fort Conde/Fort Louis going back to the 1700s, has vigorously celebrated the tradition for centuries. Rebooted with a new flavor in 1868 during Reconstruction by local legend Joe Cain, Mobile has its own style when it comes to its parades. They even drop a Moon Pie on New Year’s Eve.

With this year’s festivals canceled due to COVID, all the floats ran downtown along Royal and Water Street last Friday in honor of the commissioning of the fifth USS Mobile (LCS-26) over the weekend. The event, hosted at the State Port on Saturday, saw Gov. “Mawmaw Kay” Ivy and Coach (AKA U.S. Senator) Tommy Tuberville stop by to welcome the ship to the Navy.

The first USS Mobile was the captured Confederate blockade runner Tennessee, caught in New Orleans by Farragut in 1862 and recycled to serve in his West Gulf Blockading Squadron as a sidewheel gunboat.

The second USS Mobile was, again, a former enemy vessel, the former HAPAG liner SS Cleveland awarded to the U.S. as Great War reparations and used a troopship to bring Doughboys back from France, eventually returning to HAPAG service in 1926.

The third and most famous USS Mobile was the Cleveland-class light cruiser (CL-63), “Mow ’em down Mobile!” who earned 11 battle stars in the Pacific in WWII only to be exiled to mothballs for 12 years of purgatory in red lead before heading to the scrappers.

USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, California, circa late 1945. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph. Catalog #: NH 77364

The fourth USS Mobile was a Charleston-class amphibious cargo ship (LKA-115), which spent lots of time off Vietnam in her 25-year Cold War career. Decommissioned in 1994, she was struck from the Navy List in 2015 and is still languishing at Philadelphia NISMF, pending disposal.

An Independence-class littoral combat ship, the current USS Mobile was built at Austal only a few hundred yards from where she was commissioned and will, hopefully, go on to help prove the class’s ultimate worth and not be decommissioned in a decade. USS Mobile will homeport at Naval Base San Diego, California, from where she may soon sail into tense West Pac waters.


Laststandonzombieisland

While The Big Easy gets all the attention when it comes to Mardi Gras, it should be pointed out that Mobile, Alabama, home to the Bienville-founded French colony around Fort Conde/Fort Louis going back to the 1700s, has vigorously celebrated the tradition for centuries. Rebooted with a new flavor in 1868 during Reconstruction by local legend Joe Cain, Mobile has its own style when it comes to its parades. They even drop a Moon Pie on New Year’s Eve.

With this year’s festivals canceled due to COVID, all the floats ran downtown along Royal and Water Street last Friday in honor of the commissioning of the fifth USS Mobile (LCS-26) over the weekend. The event, hosted at the State Port on Saturday, saw Gov. “Mawmaw Kay” Ivy and Coach (AKA U.S. Senator) Tommy Tuberville stop by to welcome the ship to the Navy.

The first USS Mobile was the captured Confederate blockade runner Tennessee, caught in New Orleans by Farragut in 1862 and recycled to serve in his West Gulf Blockading Squadron as a sidewheel gunboat.

The second USS Mobile was, again, a former enemy vessel, the former HAPAG liner SS Cleveland awarded to the U.S. as Great War reparations and used a troopship to bring Doughboys back from France, eventually returning to HAPAG service in 1926.

The third and most famous USS Mobile was the Cleveland-class light cruiser (CL-63), “Mow ’em down Mobile!” who earned 11 battle stars in the Pacific in WWII only to be exiled to mothballs for 12 years of purgatory in red lead before heading to the scrappers.

USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, California, circa late 1945. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph. Catalog #: NH 77364

The fourth USS Mobile was a Charleston-class amphibious cargo ship (LKA-115), which spent lots of time off Vietnam in her 25-year Cold War career. Decommissioned in 1994, she was struck from the Navy List in 2015 and is still languishing at Philadelphia NISMF, pending disposal.

An Independence-class littoral combat ship, the current USS Mobile was built at Austal only a few hundred yards from where she was commissioned and will, hopefully, go on to help prove the class’s ultimate worth and not be decommissioned in a decade. USS Mobile will homeport at Naval Base San Diego, California, from where she may soon sail into tense West Pac waters.


World War II Database


ww2dbase Missouri, the last battleship built by the United States, was christened by Senator Harry Truman's daughter Mary Margaret Truman. She held her trials off New York, United States and shakedown cruise in the Chesapeake Bay on the east coast of the United States. On 11 Nov 1944, she set sail from Norfolk, Virginia for San Francisco, California for final fitting via the Panama Canal. Upon completion, she sailed from San Francisco to Pearl Harbor on 14 Dec, arriving 10 days later. On 2 Jan 1945, she departed Hawaii for Ulithi Islands of the Caroline Islands, where she became Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher's flagship of Task Force 58.

ww2dbase Missouri's primary guns were nine 16-inch (406-mm)/50 caliber Mark 7 naval guns, capable of sending 2,700-pound shells to a distance of 24 miles. Backing up the main weapons were ten 5-inch (127-mm)/38 caliber Mark 12 naval guns with range of 9 miles. A total of 129 anti-aircraft guns could also be found aboard the battleship, making her a formidable element in an anti-aircraft screen for carriers.

ww2dbase On 27 Jan 1945, Missouri was deployed with the Lexington group of Task Force 58, screening for the carrier as the carrier aircraft bombarded Japanese home islands. Beginning on 19 Feb, alongside of other warships, she provided naval gun support for the Battle of Iwo Jima. Task Force 58 returned to Ulithi on 5 Mar, and after that date Missouri was assigned to the Yorktown group. On 14 Mar, she departed Ulithi with the Yorktown group to conduct air strikes against air and naval facilities on the coast of the Inland Sea and southwestern Honshu, Japan, which began on 18 Mar. During this operation, Missouri's anti-aircraft guns shot down four Japanese aircraft. On 22 Mar, the task force returned to Ulithi. On 24 Mar, Missouri and other warships bombarded the southeast coast of Okinawa in preparation of the invasion. On 1 Apr, she remained in the area during the landing operation to provide naval support. On 11 Apr, she was attacked by a low-flying special attack aircraft, and the anti-aircraft gunners failed to shoot down the attacker. The aircraft crashed into the battleship on the starboard side, just below the main deck level. The starboard wing of the aircraft was thrown far forward, starting a gasoline fire on 5-in Gun Mount No. 3, while the pilot's body was thrown just aft of one of the 40-mm anti-aircraft gun tubs. The damage to the ship was only superficial. Missouri's commander, Captain William M. Callaghan, respectfully provided a sea burial with military honors for the enemy pilot against the recommendation of some of his officers and sailors. On 16 Apr, another special attack aircraft dove at the battleship this time, the attacker failed to reach the battleship and fell just astern, causing only minor shock and fragment damage. At 2305 on 17 Apr 1945, she detected a Japanese submarine 22-km from her location her report prompted an anti-submarine hunt that eventually sank the submarine I-56. She sailed away from the Okinawa area on 5 May for Ulithi, arriving on 9 May. She immediately sailed to Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands, arriving 18 May.

ww2dbase In the afternoon of 18 May 1945, Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr. of the US Navy 3rd Fleet broke his flag aboard Missouri. She departed Guam on 21 May to conduct bombardment on Okinawa on 27 May, Kyushu, Japan on 8 Jun, and Leyte, Philippine Islands on 13 Jun. On 8 Jul, she sailed with the 3rd Fleet's carriers, screening them as their aircraft struck Honshu and Hokkaido, Japan on 13 and 14 Jul. On 15 Jul, she attacked facilities of the Nihon Steel Company and the Wanishi Ironworks at Muroran, Hokkaido with her guns. During the nights of 17 and 18 Jul, she bombarded various shore targets in Honshu. She remained off Japan, performing bombardment and anti-aircraft screening duties until 9 Aug, the day Nagasaki was hit with the second atomic bomb. Missouri's crew received unofficial word that Japan was about to capitulate at 2054 on 10 Aug 1945. The official surrender announcement for the crew came on 15 Aug. On 16 Aug 1945, Commander of the British Pacific Fleet Admiral Sir Bruce Fraser came on board of the battleship to award Halsey with the Order of the Knight of the British Empire. On 21 Aug, she sent a 200-men party to battleship Iowa for temporary duty with the initial occupation force for Tokyo. In the early morning of 29 Aug, she entered Tokyo Bay.

ww2dbase On 2 Sep 1945, Missouri received high-ranking military officials of Allied nations for the official surrender ceremony. At 0843, Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers General of the Army Douglas MacArthur arrived. At 0856, Japanese Foreign Minister Mamoru Shigemitsu and other representatives arrived. The surrender ceremony began at 0902 before two American flags one of them had flown on the mast of Commodore Matthew Perry's ship when she arrived in Edo (now Tokyo) on 8 Jul 1853, and the other was Missouri's mast flag. The ceremony ended at 0930.

ww2dbase In the afternoon of 5 Sep 1945, Halsey transferred his flag to battleship South Dakota, and early the next day Missouri departed Tokyo Bay on a mission to bring American personnel from Guam to Pearl Harbor, as a part of Operation Magic Carpet. She arrived at Pearl Harbor on 20 Sep, then reached New York City on 23 Oct 1945. As the flagship of Admiral Jonas Ingram, command of the US Navy Atlantic Fleet, she hosted President Harry Truman for Navy Day ceremonies on 27 Oct. After an overhaul in the New York Navy Yard and a training cruise to Cuba, Missouri received the remains of Turkish Ambassador to the United States Mehmet Munir Ertegun and delivered him to Istanbul, arriving on 5 Apr 1946. She visited Phaleron Bay, Piraeus, Greece between 10 and 26 Apr before returning to the United States. On 13 Dec, while on exercise in the North Atlantic, a star shell accidentally struck the ship, but caused no damage or injuries. On 30 Aug 1947, she arrived at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil as a symbol of American naval power at the Inter-American Conference for the Maintenance of Hemisphere Peace and Security on 2 Sep, she hosted President Truman after the signing of the Rio Treaty. On 7 Sep, she brought Truman and his family back to Norfolk, Virginia, United States. She entered New York Navy Yard for an overhaul between 23 Sep 1947 and 10 Mar 1948. Between Mar 1948 and Sep 1949, when she entered Norfolk Naval Shipyard for overhaul, she conducted training cruises and participated in exercises. In the morning of 17 Jan 1950, as she exited Norfolk Naval Shipyard after overhaul, she accidentally grounded off Hampton Roads near Old Point Comfort and incurred damage. She was refloated on 1 Feb and repaired shortly after.

ww2dbase During the late 1940s, the United States Navy decommissioned a great number of ships, but Missouri survived the downsizing. It was largely due to Truman, who interfered due to his fondness for the battleship which he had traveled aboard several times and due to the fact that his daughter had christened the battleship.

ww2dbase During the Korean War, Missouri was dispatched on 19 Aug 1950, arriving west of Kyushu on 14 Sep to become the flagship of Rear Admiral A. E. Smith. Alongside of cruiser Helena and two destroyers, she bombarded Samchok on 15 Sep as indirect support for the Inchon landings. Between 10 and 14 Oct, she was the flagship of Rear Admiral J. M. Higgins, commander of Cruiser Division 5. On 14 Oct, at Sasebo, Japan, she became the flagship of Vice Admiral A. D. Struble, commander of the 7th Fleet. She bombarded enemy positions in the Chonjin and Tanchon areas between 22 and 26 Oct, then screened carriers near Wonsan. On 23 Dec, in reaction to the surprising Chinese involvement in the Korean War, Missouri moved off Hungnam to provide gunfire support until the US 3rd Division there could be evacuated by sea over the course of the next two days. She remained near Korea until 19 Mar 1951. She sailed to Yokosuka, Japan on 24 Mar, and by 28 Mar was on her way home.

ww2dbase Missouri arrived at Norfolk, Virginia on 27 Apr and became the flagship of Rear Admiral James L. Holloway, Jr., the commander of the US Navy Atlantic Fleet's Cruiser Force. She conducted two training exercises to northern Europe in the summer of 1951. On 18 Oct 1951, she entered Norfolk Naval Shipyard for overhaul that lasted until 30 Jan 1952. She conducted missions in home waters, then entered Norfolk once again for fitting on 4 Aug for a second tour in Korea.

ww2dbase Sailing out of Hampton Roads, Virginia on 11 Sep 1952, Missouri arrived at Yokosuka, Japan on 17 Oct, becoming the flagship of Vice Admiral Joseph J. Clark, commander of the 7th Fleet. On 19 Oct, she provided gunfire support against enemy targets in the Chaho-Tanchon area, Chongjin, and the Tanchon-Sonjin area. Between 25 Oct 1952 and 2 Jan 1953, she attacked enemy positions at Chaho, Wonsan, Hamhung, and Hungnam. On 23 Jan 1953, she hosted United Nations Commander-in-Chief American General Mark W. Clark and British Admiral Sir Guy Russell. In Feb and Mar, she struck against Wonsan, Tanehon, Hungnam, and Kojo on the eastern coast of Korea. After the final gunfire support mission at Kojo on 25 Mar, she sailed for Yokosuka then returned home to Norfolk, arriving 4 May.

ww2dbase At Norfolk, Virginia, Missouri became the flagship of Rear Admiral E. T. Woolridge, commander of the US Navy Atlantic Fleet's battleships and cruisers, on 14 May 1953. She conducted various training exercises between Jun 1953 and Jun 1954, then set sail for California, United States for inactivation. She was decommissioned at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 26 Feb 1955. While inactivated for the next 30 years, she served as a museum ship that hosted 180,000 visitors per year.

ww2dbase In 1984, Missouri was reactivated as President Ronald Reagan and Secretary of the Navy John F. Lehman pushed for a 600-ship-strong US Navy. She was modernized at Long Beach Naval Yard, which involved the removal of her Oerlikon 20-mm anti-aircraft guns, Bofors 40-mm anti-aircraft guns, and two of the 5-inch gun mounts. In their places, four Phalanx CIWS (close-in weapon system for close-range missile defense), eight armored box launchers (with 32 BGM-109 Tomahawk missiles), and four MK 141 quad cell launchers (with 16 AGM-84 Harpoon anti-ship missiles) were installed. For spotters, the propeller planes of the WW2-era and helicopters of the Korean War era were replaced by eight remotely-controlled RQ-2 Pioneer Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. In addition, state-of-the-art radar and fire control systems were installed. When she was recommissioned on 10 May 1986 at San Francisco, California, she was so advanced that Secretary of Defense Casper W. Weinberger commented that Missouri symbolized the "rebirth of American sea power". The battleship went on an around-the-world cruise, visiting Australia, Egypt, Turkey, Italy, Spain, Portugal, and Panama, becoming the first battleship to circumnavigate the globe in 80 years.

ww2dbase In 1987, she was re-equipped with 40-mm grenade launchers and 25-mm chain guns, and then on 25 Jul 1987 sent to participate in Operation Earnest Will to escort Kuwaiti oil tankers in the Persian Gulf against Iranian threats. She returned to the United States in early 1988 via the Indian and Pacific Oceans. In mid-1988, she exercised in Hawaiian waters with military forces from the United States, Australia, Canada, and Japan. In 1989, she visited Pusan in the Republic of Korea. In 1989 and 1990, she participated in exercises with friendly nations as she had in 1988.

ww2dbase On 2 Aug 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait, starting the First Gulf War. American forces were deployed to Saudi Arabia by mid-Aug by President George H. W. Bush's orders, and Missouri departed for Persian Gulf from Pier 6 at Long Beach, California, United States on 13 Nov, reaching Hormuz on 3 Jan 1991. Beginning at 0140 on 17 Jan 1991, she began her role as a missile platform, firing 28 Tomahawk missiles at Iraqi targets over the course of the next five days. On 29 Jan 1991, she bombarded an Iraqi command and control bunker near the Saudi border with her primary weapons, which was the first naval gunfire support operation of the First Gulf War and the first time she fired her 16-inch primary weapons since Mar 1953 during the Korean War. Beginning on the night of 3 Feb, she bombarded Iraqi beach defenses in Kuwait, firing 112 rounds from her primary guns over the next three days until relieved by her sister ship Wisconsin. She fired 60 rounds off Khafji on 11 and 12 Feb, and then another 133 rounds during the landing operations on Kuwaiti beaches on 23 Feb. The latter action was challenged by two Iraqi HY-2 Silkworm missiles one missed, and the other was intercepted by GWS-30 Sea Dart missiles launched by British air defense destroyer Gloucester. On 25 Feb 1991, she was damaged in a friendly fire incident where American frigate Jarrett's Phalanx weapon damaged Missouri. Combat operations in Iraq exceeded the range of her primary guns by 26 Feb, so on 21 Mar she sailed for home.

ww2dbase On 7 Dec 1991, the 50th anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack, she hosted President Bush during the remembrance ceremony. On 31 Mar 1992, she was decommissioned at Long Beach, California, United States. Her last commanding officer, Captain Albert L. Kaiss, wrote this note in the ship's final Plan of the Day:

Our final day has arrived. Today the final chapter in battleship Missouri's history will be written. It's often said that the crew makes the command. There is no truer statement. for it's the crew of this great ship that made this a great command. You are a special breed of sailors and Marines and I am proud to have served with each and every one of you. To you who have made the painful journey of putting this great lady to sleep, I thank you. For you have had the toughest job. To put away a ship that has become as much a part of you as you are to her is a sad ending to a great tour. But take solace in this—you have lived up to the history of the ship and those who sailed her before us. We took her to war, performed magnificently and added another chapter in her history, standing side by side our forerunners in true naval tradition. God bless you all.

ww2dbase Missouri remained part of the reserve fleet at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, Washington, United States until 12 Jan 1995, when she was struck from the Naval Vessel Register. On 4 May 1998, Secretary of the Navy John H. Dalton signed the donation contract that transferred the historic battleship to the nonprofit USS Missouri Memorial Association of Honolulu, Hawaii, setting the course for her to become a museum ship. She was towed to Ford Island, Pearl Harbor, reaching the destination on 22 Jun 1998. On 29 Jan 1999, she was opened as a museum ship that symbolized the end of WW2 in Asia and the Pacific she was 500 yards from the Arizona Memorial in Pearl Harbor, which symbolized the start of the Pacific War.

ww2dbase Source: Wikipedia.

Last Major Revision: Aug 2007

Battleship Missouri (BB-63) Interactive Map

Missouri Operational Timeline

6 Jan 1941 The keel of battleship Missouri was laid down.
29 Jan 1944 Battleship Missouri was launched, sponsored by Mary Magaret Truman, daughter of Senator Harry Truman.
11 Jun 1944 Missouri was commissioned into service.
14 Dec 1944 USS Missouri departed Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
24 Dec 1944 USS Missouri arrived at San Francisco, California, United States.
2 Jan 1945 USS Missouri departed US Territory of Hawaii for Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
19 Feb 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Iwo Jima, Japan.
5 Mar 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
14 Mar 1945 USS Missouri departed Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
18 Mar 1945 USS Missouri escorted carriers while the aircraft aircraft struck Japan.
22 Mar 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
24 Mar 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Okinawa, Japan.
1 Apr 1945 USS Missouri covered the landings at Okinawa, Japan.
11 Apr 1945 A Japanese special attack aircraft crashed into the starboard side of USS Missouri, causing minor damage. The remains of the Japanese pilot was given a sea burial with military honors.
16 Apr 1945 A special attack aircraft dove at USS Missouri off Okinawa, Japan. Falling astern of the battleship, the attack caused only minor shock and fragment damage.
5 May 1945 USS Missouri departed Okinawa, Japan.
9 May 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Ulithi, Caroline Islands.
18 May 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Apra Harbor, Guam, Mariana Islands. In the afternoon, she became the flagship of Admiral William Halsey of the US Navy 3rd Fleet.
21 May 1945 USS Missouri departed Guam, Mariana Islands.
27 May 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Japanese positions on Okinawa, Japan.
8 Jun 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Kyushu, Japan.
13 Jun 1945 USS Missouri bombarded Japanese positions on Luzon, Philippine Islands.
8 Jul 1945 USS Missouri set sail as an escort for carriers.
13 Jul 1945 USS Missouri escorted carriers while the aircraft struck Japan.
14 Jul 1945 USS Missouri escorted carriers while the aircraft struck Japan.
16 Aug 1945 British Admiral Bruce Fraser visited USS Missouri.
21 Aug 1945 USS Missouri dispatched a 200-men party to USS Iowa for temporary duty with the initial occupation force for Tokyo, Japan.
29 Aug 1945 USS Missouri entered Tokyo Bay, Japan.
2 Sep 1945 Japan signed the surrender document aboard USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay, Japan. Later on the same day, the Japanese Imperial General Headquarters issued General Order No. 1 written by US Joint Chiefs of Staff, which instructed Japanese forces on matters of surrender.
5 Sep 1945 USS Missouri was relieved of duty as Admiral William Halsey's flagship.
6 Sep 1945 USS Missouri departed Tokyo Bay, Japan.
20 Sep 1945 USS Missouri arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
23 Oct 1945 USS Missouri arrived at New York, New York, United States.
27 Oct 1945 USS Missouri hosted US President Harry Truman for the annual Navy Day ceremonies at New York, New York, United States.
22 Mar 1946 USS Missouri departed the United States with the remains of Turkish Ambassador Mehmet Munir Ertegun.
5 Apr 1946 USS Missouri arrived at Istanbul, Turkey with the remains of Turkish Ambassador Mehmet Munir Ertegun.
10 Apr 1946 USS Missouri arrived at Piraeus, Greece.
26 Apr 1946 USS Missouri departed Piraeus, Greece.
13 Dec 1946 A star shell accidentally struck USS Missouri during an exercise in the North Atlantic, causing no damage nor injuries.
30 Aug 1947 USS Missouri arrived at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
2 Sep 1947 US President Harry Truman embarked USS Missouri at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
7 Sep 1947 USS Missouri arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States, disembarking US President Harry Truman.
23 Sep 1947 USS Missouri entered New York Naval Shipyard in New York, United States for a scheduled overhaul.
10 Mar 1948 USS Missouri completed her scheduled overhaul at New York Naval Shipyard in New York, United States.
17 Jan 1950 USS Missouri accidentally grounded off Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
1 Feb 1950 USS Missouri was refloated she had accidentally grounded off Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States on 17 Jan 1950.
19 Aug 1950 USS Missouri set sail for Korea.
14 Sep 1950 USS Missouri arrived off Kyushu, Japan and became the flagship of Rear Admiral A. E. Smith.
15 Sep 1950 USS Missouri bombarded communist positions at Samchok, Korea.
10 Oct 1950 USS Missouri became the flagship of Rear Admiral Admiral J. M. Higgins of Cruiser Division 5.
14 Oct 1950 USS Missouri was relieved of the duty of being the flagship of Rear Admiral Admiral J. M. Higgins of Cruiser Division 5.
22 Oct 1950 USS Missouri began bombarding communist positions in the Chongjin-Tanchon area, Korea.
26 Oct 1950 USS Missouri ended bombarding communist positions in the Chongjin-Tanchon area, Korea.
23 Dec 1950 USS Missouri provided gunfire support during the evacuation of US troops at Hungnam, Korea.
19 Mar 1951 USS Missouri departed Korea.
24 Mar 1951 USS Missouri arrived at Yokohama, Japan.
28 Mar 1951 USS Missouri departed Yokohama, Japan.
27 Apr 1951 USS Missouri arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
18 Oct 1951 USS Missouri entered Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States for a scheduled overhaul.
30 Mar 1952 USS Missouri completed her scheduled overhaul at Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States.
4 Aug 1952 USS Missouri entered Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, United States for refitting.
11 Sep 1952 USS Missouri departed Hampton Roads, Virginia, United States.
17 Oct 1952 USS Missouri arrived at Yokosuka, Japan and became the flagship of Vice Admiral Joseph J. Clark of the US Navy 7th Fleet.
19 Oct 1952 USS Missouri provided gunfire support in the Tanchon area in Korea.
23 Jan 1953 USS Missouri hosted a meeting between US General Mark Clark and British Admiral Guy Russell.
25 Mar 1953 USS Missouri bombarded Koja, Korea, which was her final gunfire support mission in Korea.
4 May 1953 USS Missouri arrived at Norfolk, Virginia, United States.
14 May 1953 USS Missouri became the flagship of Rear Admiral E. T. Woolridge.
15 Sep 1954 USS Missouri entered Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for deactivation overhaul.
26 Feb 1955 Missouri was decommissioned from service.
10 May 1986 USS Missouri was recommissioned into service at San Francisco, California, United States.
25 Jul 1987 USS Missouri departed for Persian Gulf.
13 Nov 1990 USS Missouri departed Long Beach, California, United States for the Middle East.
3 Jan 1991 USS Missouri arrived at the Strait of Hormuz off Iran.
17 Jan 1991 USS Missouri began firing Tomahawk missles at Iraqi targets over the next five days.
29 Jan 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions near the Iraqi-Saudi border.
3 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
11 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
12 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
23 Feb 1991 USS Missouri bombarded Iraqi positions in Kuwait.
25 Feb 1991 USS Missouri was accidentally damaged by USS Jarrett.
21 Mar 1991 USS Missouri departed Persian Gulf.
7 Dec 1991 USS Missouri hosted US President George Bush for a remembrance ceremony on the anniversary of the Pearl Harbor attack.
31 Mar 1992 USS Missouri was decommissioned at Long Beach, California, United States.
12 Jan 1995 Battleship Missouri was struck from the US Naval Register.
4 May 1998 Battleship Missouri was transferred to the USS Missouri Memorial Association.
22 Jun 1998 Battleship Missouri arrived at Ford Island in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, United States under tow.
29 Jan 1999 Museum ship Missouri was opened to visitors.

Did you enjoy this article or find this article helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.


USS Mobile (CL-63)


Figure 1: USS Mobile (CL-63) off the Norfolk Navy Yard at Portsmouth, Virginia, 14 April 1943. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS Mobile (CL-63) off the Norfolk Navy Yard at Portsmouth, Virginia, 14 April 1943. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS Mobile (CL-63) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 18 July 1943. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: USS Mobile (CL-63) underway in the Pacific, October 1943, probably at the time of the raid on Marcus Island. Photographed by Lieutenant Commander Charles Kerlee, USNR. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: USS Mobile (CL-63) underway in the Pacific, with an SBD aircraft flying overhead. Taken during combat operations in October 1943, probably at the time of the raid on Marcus Island. Photographed by Lieutenant Commander Charles Kerlee, USNR. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 6: USS Mobile’s (CL-63) plan view amidships, looking aft, taken from a pier-side crane at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 18 July 1943. Circles mark recent alterations to the ship. Note: antennas for SG radar atop the fore and main masts Mark 34 and Mark 37 gun directors, with antennas for Mark 8 and Mark 4 radars atop them fully equipped life rafts. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 7: USS Mobile’s (CL-63) plan view amidships, looking forward, taken from a pier-side crane at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 18 July 1943. Circles mark recent alterations to the ship. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 8: USS Mobile’s (CL-63) plan view aft, taken from a pier-side crane at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 18 July 1943. Circles mark recent alterations to the ship, in this case newly installed life rafts and floater nets. Note OS2U "Kingfisher" floatplanes atop the ship's catapults. Official US Navy Photograph, from the Collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 9: View from USS Mobile’s (CL-63) fantail, looking across her open aircraft hangar hatch toward the starboard quarter, during the October 1943 raid on Marcus Island. Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" floatplanes are on her catapults. The plane on the starboard catapult has a small bomb under its wing. USS Yorktown (CV-10) is in the center distance. Photographed by Photographer's Mate Alphonso Ianelli. Official US Navy Photograph, now in the Collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 10: Battle of Leyte Gulf, October 1944, with USS Mobile (CL-63) firing on the Japanese destroyer Hatsuzuki, during the evening of 25 October 1944, at the end of the Battle off Cape Engaño. Photographed from USS Wichita (CA-45). Official US Navy Photograph, now in the Collections of the National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 11: USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, California, circa late 1945. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1973. US Naval Historical Center Photograph. Click on photograph for larger image.

Named after a city in Alabama, USS Mobile (CL-63) was a 10,000-ton Cleveland class light cruiser that was built by the Newport News Shipbuilding Company at Newport News, Virginia, and was commissioned on 24 March 1943. The ship was approximately 610 feet long and 66 feet wide, had a top speed of 33 knots, and had a crew of 1,266 officers and men. Mobile was armed with 12 6-inch guns, 12 5-inch guns, and 28 40-mm guns. Mobile also carried one Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" floatplane on each of her two catapults.

After being commissioned in March 1943, Mobile completed her shakedown cruise along the east coast of the United States. The ship then was sent to the Pacific and almost immediately participated in bombarding Japanese-held islands. On 31 August 1943, Mobile bombarded tiny Marcus Island, hitting the Japanese garrison there. On 18 September, the cruiser did a preliminary bombardment of Tarawa in the Gilbert Islands. Then on 5 and 6 October, Mobile pounded Wake Island, which had been taken from the United States at the beginning of the war, and on 21 October, the light cruiser hit Bougainville in the Solomon Islands. In November 1943, Mobile participated in the actual invasions of Bougainville and Tarawa. She was then assigned to Task Force 50, a fast carrier task force, on 1 December and joined the initial attack on the Marshall Islands. After a brief return to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, and then San Diego, California, Mobile was sent back to the fighting. In late January 1944, Mobile participated in a major American assault on Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. For roughly two weeks, the ship pounded targets on Kwajalein in support of the American amphibious landings on the island.

From mid-February through May 1944, Mobile was attached to carrier task forces that assaulted targets throughout the central Pacific and along the northern coast of New Guinea. She went on to participate in the Marianas campaign in June and July, which included the Battle of the Philippines Sea. In early August 1944, Mobile made a surface sweep through the area of the Bonin and Volcano Islands, assisting in the sinking of one Japanese destroyer and a large cargo vessel.

Mobile screened carriers during the Palau Islands campaign in September 1944, and went on to bombard numerous Japanese targets in the western Pacific region. On 25 October 1944, during the invasion of Leyte in the Philippines, Mobile took part in the Battle off Cape Engaño, the northern component of the epic Battle of Leyte Gulf, using her guns to assist in sinking the Japanese aircraft carrier Chiyoda and destroyer Hatsuzuki.

Mobile continued to screen carriers until late December 1944, as they continued to support the American re-conquest of the Philippines. After being sent back to the United States for a badly needed overhaul in January 1945, Mobile returned to fighting in March 1945 and spent all of April and May providing gunfire support for US ground forces on the island of Okinawa. She remained there until the Japanese were defeated.

After the Japanese surrendered in late August 1945, Mobile assisted in the occupation of Japan. In late 1946, Mobile also made two “Magic Carpet” voyages which transported American troops from Asia back to the United States. After completing those trips, Mobile was sent to the Puget Sound Navy Yard at Bremerton, Washington, for inactivation. She was formally decommissioned on 9 May 1947, but remained part of the Pacific Reserve Fleet for the next 12 years. However, USS Mobile was stricken from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 March 1959 and sold for scrapping in December of that same year. The ship received 11 battle stars for her service during World War II.


USS Mobile (CL 63)

Decommissioned 9 May 1947.
Stricken 1 March 1959.
Sold 19 January 1960 to be broken up for scrap.

Commands listed for USS Mobile (CL 63)

Please note that we're still working on this section.

CommanderFromTo
1Capt. Charles Julian Wheeler, USN24 Mar 194329 Jul 1944
2Capt. Christopher Chaffee Miller, USN29 Jul 194428 Aug 1945
3T/Capt. Thomas Lawrence Lewis, USN28 Aug 1945Aug 1946

You can help improve our commands section
Click here to Submit events/comments/updates for this vessel.
Please use this if you spot mistakes or want to improve this ships page.

Notable events involving Mobile include:

12 Feb 1944
Task Force 58 departed Majuro Atoll for operation HAILSTONE, a raid against the Japanese base at Truk Atoll.


USS PGM-7

PLEASE NOTE: Due to changes in my schedule, we are now back to our normal schedule. The next ship will be featured on Tuesday, September 6.


Figure 1: USS PGM-7 photographed by the South Coast Company, Newport Beach, California, in January 1944. Official US Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 2: USS PGM-7 photographed by the South Coast Company, Newport Beach, California, on 7 January 1944. Courtesy US National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 3: USS PGM-7 photographed by the South Coast Company, Newport Beach, California, in January 1944. Courtesy US National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 4: Interior of bridge and mast details on board PGM-7. Date unknown. Photo by Kent Hitchcock, Marine and Commercial Photographer, Balboa, CA. Courtesy of the US National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 5: Interior of bridge of PGM-7. Date unknown. Photo by Kent Hitchcock, Marine and Commercial Photographer, Balboa, CA. Courtesy of the US National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.


Figure 6: Interior of radio room on board PGM-7. Date unknown. Photo by Kent Hitchcock, Marine and Commercial Photographer, Balboa, CA. Courtesy of the US National Archives. Click on photograph for larger image.

USS SC-1072 was a 95-ton submarine chaser that was built by the Mathis Yacht Building Company at Camden, New Jersey, and was commissioned on 28 June 1943. The ship was 110 feet long and 23 feet wide, had a top speed of 21 knots, and had a crew of 28 officers and men. This particular sub chaser was armed with one 3-inch gun, one 40-mm gun, and four twin .50-caliber machine guns (although weapons sometimes varied from ship to ship).

After being commissioned, SC-1072 served along America’s east coast. But on 10 December 1943, she was re-classified a gunboat and named PGM-7. This small gunboat then was transported all the way to the Solomon Islands for patrol duty. After PGM-7 arrived in the Solomon Islands, she immediately began patrolling the general area. But on the night of 18 July 1944, USS PGM-7 was lost in an accidental collision off Torokina, Bougainville Island. The ship sank a little more than a year after she was commissioned.

These are all the facts that can be found on this small ship. There were many such boats that were lost by the US Navy throughout the war. Few will ever know the names of the crewmembers that served on board these ships, let alone what they did. But they were just as much a part of the final victory over the Japanese and Germans as any of the larger warships possessed by the Allied navies. Their sacrifices should not be forgotten.


USS Liscome Bay: Hit By a Torpedo Near Makin Atoll During World War II

She began life as a nameless Hull in the Kaiser shipyards in Vancouver, Washington, on December 12, 1942. And she ended her short, 11-month span in 23 terrifying minutes off Makin Atoll in the Pacific, after being struck by a single torpedo from a Japanese submarine.

She was the first of her flock to go, but before war’s end in 1945, the ill-fated CVE-56 would be joined by five more American-built escort carriers (CVEs) sunk by enemy action. They were: Block Island (CVE-21), sunk by the German submarine U-549 in the Atlantic on May 29, 1944 Gambier Bay (CVE-73), sunk in the Battle of Samar by Japanese cruiser gunfire on October 25, 1944 St. Lo (CVE-63), sunk by a Japanese kamikaze plane attack on October 25, 1944 Ommaney Bay (CVE-79), scuttled after being struck by a kamikaze on January 4, 1945 and Bismarck Sea (CVE-95), sunk by a kamikaze off Iwo Jima on February 21, 1945.

The loss of these ships, tragic and costly in lives as they were, did not compare to the shock that went through America’s CVE crews when that first escort carrier was sunk in November 1943. Relatively speaking, it should also be noted, no other single carrier in World War II, escort, light or fast, suffered higher casualties — 600 men killed out of a crew of 900, 70 percent of the crew gone in only 20-plus minutes.

CVE-56 had a name, of course — the USS Liscome Bay.

She began her life as Maritime Commission Hull No. 1137. And when work began on her in earnest as an auxiliary aircraft tender, her designation was changed to Kaiser Shipyards Hull No. 302.

The name she would be given upon her completion, and when she was turned over to the British Royal Navy, would be HMS Ameer (ACV-56).

By April 19, 1943, Ameer‘s Hull and part of her flight deck were finished. She was launched in a special ceremony at the Kaiser shipyards by her sponsor, Mrs. Clara Morrell. Mrs. Morrell was the wife of Rear Adm. Ben Morrell, founder of the U.S. Navy ‘Seabees.’ Also attending the ceremony was Mrs. Walter Krebs, matron of honor Lt. Cmdr. H.C. Zitzewitz, liason officer at the Vancouver yards and James MacDonald, the British consul in Portland, Ore., who spoke at the ceremony.

After an invocation by Dr. Perry C. Hoffer of the Westminster Presbyterian Church, Mrs. Morrell stepped up to the platform built near the bow of the partially finished Hull and smashed the traditional bottle of champagne against the bow section, sending Ameer sliding down the ways into the Columbia River.

On the same day, tugs took the powerless Hull and towed it downstream 100 miles from Vancouver to the Astoria (Oregon) Naval Station for final fitting out and delivery.

By that time, 3 1/2 months later, in August 1943, the Ameer would have new owners and even a new name.

On June 28, 1943, the vice chief of U.S. Naval Operations, Admiral J.H. Newton, endorsed a recommendation that 29 auxiliary aircraft carriers built for the British navy be assigned to the United States. He further recommended changing their British names and redesignating their class as CVE (aircraft carrier, escort) instead of ACV (auxiliary aircraft carrier).

And so HMS Ameer, formerly Hull No. 302, become USS Liscome Bay, named after a small bay on the south coast of Dall Island, which lies off the southern coast of Alaska. This followed the practice of naming escort carriers after bays, islands and sounds of the United States, or after major U.S. operations, battles and engagements.

On July 15, 1943, Liscome Bay‘s redesignation from ACV-56 to CVE-56 was completed. The fitting out continued in Astoria. On August 7, 1943, Liscome Bay was delivered to the U.S. Navy. Her log records the event: �. Pursuant to orders…. Vessel commissioned U.S.S. Liscome Bay….Capt. I.D. Wiltse assumed command.’

Like all escort carriers, Liscome Bay was built mostly from a converted merchant-ship Hull. Her primary functions were to serve as a convoy escort, to provide aircraft for close air support during amphibious landing operations, and to ferry aircraft to naval bases and fleet carriers at sea.

Accordingly, she was built no larger than her original Hull, given no more armament than was considered necessary for self-defense, and allowed no more speed than she needed to perform the tasks assigned her.

She was 512 feet long, with a beam of 108 feet. She displaced 7,800 tons. Her flight deck was only 400 feet long and 80 feet wide. Two elevators had been installed, one forward, one aft, and a single catapult was located forward on the port side, over the bow.

Her armament consisted of a single l5-inch, .38-caliber open gun mounted in a gun tub overhanging her square stern. Sixteen 40mm cannons in two mounts and twenty 20mm machine guns, scattered below the flight deck on both port and starboard sides, were her chief anti-aircraft armament.

Liscome Bay‘s ‘black gang’ worked with her two Skinner Uniflow reciprocating steam engines in twin, split-plan engine rooms, using superheated steam running at 4,500 ihp (indicated horsepower) and 161 rpm to turn the ship’s twin propellers and produce her top speed of 16 knots.

Liscome Bay carried a crew of 960 men. Most were recent graduates from boot camp. Others, like the aerology crew, had served on board the aircraft carrier USS Wasp (CV-7) before she was sunk in the South Pacific by a Japanese submarine in September 1942. Others had served on the ill-fated heavy cruiser Quincy (CA-39), sunk in the Battle of Savo Island in August 1942. A few had been on the legendary carrier Enterprise (CV-6), and several of her crewmen had witnessed the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

Veteran or recruit, old salt or recent landlubber, all had to consider that the most important member of the crew was their skipper, Captain Irving Day Wiltse, 56, Liscome Bay‘s first and last commanding officer. He had served as a navigator on the U.S. carrier Yorktown (CV-5) during the Battle of Midway and had commanded a seaplane tender, the Albemarle, before assuming command of Liscome Bay on the day of her commissioning. Wiltse was respected by his crew.

A month after the commissioning, after all the initial trials and shakedown cruises around Astoria, Liscome Bay got underway under her own power for the first time.

Arriving at Puget Sound on September 8, Liscome Bay proceeded to Bremerton Naval Station for degaussing and adjusting of her compasses and radio equipment. She spent four days undergoing further ship’s trials before sailing for Seattle, Wash. There, her 20mm AA guns were test-fired. She docked until September 17, 1943, and then sailed for San Francisco. Liscome Bay docked at the Alameda Naval Air Station for refueling and to take on more personnel. The next stop would be San Diego, for an extensive series of shakedown drills and exercises off the southern California coast.

On October 11, while the escort carrier was docked in San Diego for refueling, she received an addition to her complement in the form of Rear Adm. Henry Maston Mullinnix, who would be commanding a carrier division, with Liscome Bay as his flagship.

Called by a former classmate ‘one of our outstanding young admirals,’ Henry Mullinnix had graduated first in his Navel Academy class of 1916, had served in World War I on a destroyer, had helped design the Navy’s first diesel engine, had become a Navy pilot, and had commanded the carrier Saratoga (CV-3) before being appointed to the rank of admiral on August 28, 1943.

A sailor who served on his staff later said, ‘As a man, you couldn’t find a person any better… ‘

He was accompanied by his chief of staff, Captain John G. Crommelin. An outstanding pilot and officer, Crommelin had served aboard the Enterprise at the Battle of Santa Cruz in 1942, and was the oldest of five brothers, all Annapolis graduates, all naval officers who would serve in the war. ‘He was as fine a man as the admiral,’ one sailor said of Crommelin. ‘You could talk to him about any problem you had.’

Crommelin’s job as chief of staff was to ensure the efficient operation of the staff for Carrier Division 24, Mullinnix’s first flag command. At 1000 hours in October 11, Mullinnix, in the words of the log, ‘Hoisted his flag aboard Liscome Bay.’

More time was now spent in extensive drills and shakedown cruises. On October 14, the carrier received its aircraft, 12 FM-2 and F4F Wildcat fighters and 16 TBM-1C Avenger torpedo bombers as Composite Squadron No. 39. The commander of Composite Squadron 39 (known as VC-39 in Navy records), Lt. Cmdr. Marshall U. Beebe, became responsible for flight operations of the squadron and for the lives of its 36 officers and 41 enlisted men.

After further drills, along with landing and takeoff practice by VC-39’s planes, Liscome Bay set sail October 22 for Pearl Harbor — and the new ship’s first battle mission.

The carrier reached Pearl Harbor on October 28 and moored at the Ford Island Naval Air Station. There were additional drills and exercises in Hawaiian waters, including rehearsals for the upcoming Gilbert Islands invasion, until on November 10, Liscome Bay, accompanied by her sister ships Coral Sea (CVE-57) and Corregidor (CVE-58), sortied from Pearl Harbor with the ships of Rear Adm. Richmond Kelly Turner’s Northern Attack Force, Task Force 52. Included in the force were the battleships New Mexico, Mississippi, Idaho and Pennsylvania, four heavy cruisers and 14 screening destroyers, all escorting six transports carrying units of the 165th Regimental Combat Team of the 27th Infantry Division.

The Liscome Bay and her companion ships soon joined the most powerful U.S. naval force assembled in the Pacific up to that time-13 battleships, 8 heavy cruisers, 4 light cruisers, 4 Essex-class and 4 Independence-class aircraft carriers, 4 escort carriers, 70 destroyers and destroyer escorts. In all, 191 warships in four task forces, coming together from six different directions, all closing in on three tiny Japanese-held atolls in the Central Pacific: Tarawa, Makin and Abemama in the Gilbert Islands.

The pending operation was code-named Galvanic. Its objective was the capture of all three atolls as a steppingstone for future landings in the nearby Marshall Islands. The planners wanted to establish airfields and naval bases in the Gilberts, and to give U.S. forces valuable experience in amphibious operations.

The Southern Attack Force, or Task Force 53, under the command of Rear Adm. Harry W. Hill, was assigned the capture of Tarawa Atoll in the central Gilberts. The northern Attack Force, Task Force 52, under Admiral Turner, was given the objective of capturing Makin Atoll in the northern Gilberts. Marine raiders, operating from the submarine Nautilus, would take Abemama in a separate operation while the main forces were assaulting Tarawa and Makin.

It was with these objectives laid out that Task Force 52 had sortied from Pearl Harbor on the morning of November 10, 1943.

Between November 11 and 19, Liscome Bay, along with the other carriers of CarDiv24, conducted flight operations and anti-aircraft gunnery practice and provided aircraft for anti-submarine patrols around the task force as it steamed for its distant objective.

Even these routine aircraft operations were not without cost. On November 15, Liscome Bay suffered her first operational casualty when Ensign F.C. Fairman’s FM-1 Wildcat crashed at sea three minutes after launching. Ensign Fairman was killed in the crash.

By ‘Dog Day,’ November 20, Task Force 52 had arrived off Makin Atoll and commenced its pre-landing bombardment of the landing beaches. There was no reply from the outnumbered Japanese defenders on Makin’s main island, Butaritari, but an accidental explosion in the main gun turret of the battleship Mississippi killed 43 men and wounded 19 others.

The landing forces went ashore and, overcoming fierce Japanese resistance, secured the island on November 23 after nearly 76 hours of fighting.

Throughout this time, Liscome Bay‘s aircraft played their assigned part by providing direct support of the landings and subsequent ground operations, and flying combat air patrols and anti-submarine patrols around the task force. But again, not without cost. One Avenger was lost in a crash at sea, another in an emergency landing near Makin Island and a Wildcat was so seriously damaged in a barrier crash that it was dismantled for spare parts.

Then on November 23, five Wildcats took off from Liscome Bay on a late-afternoon patrol. After takeoff the patrol was vectored out to intercept radar ‘bogies’ northwest of Makin. The patrol, led by Lieutenant Foster J. Blair, proceeded a distance of 40 miles from the ship, then lost contact with her.

When the patrol returned to the spot where Liscome Bay should have been, they could not find her. Bad weather and growing darkness, along with the lack of real navigational equipment carried by the planes (hardly more than a compass and a plot board), compounded their problem.

They radioed for help and were directed to land on the big carriers of Rear Adm. C.A. ‘Baldy’ Pownall’s Task Group 50.1, 60 miles south of Makin and the escort carriers. Two of the Wildcats successfully made night landings on the Yorktown, but the third had trouble. This plane bounced off the carrier’s flight deck and into the planes parked on Yorktown‘s bow.

The Wildcat’s pilot bolted clear of his plane without injury, but its belly tank exploded, killing five deck crewmen and setting fire to the parked aircraft. Only quick thinking and heroism by Yorktown‘s crew saved the carrier from further damage. The two remaining Liscome Bay Wildcats landed safely on the nearby USS Lexington.

As the five VC-39 pilots in the errant flight hit the sack that night, they had no idea how lucky they were.

Near Makin, a tragedy was in the making.

At sundown on November 23, the ships of the now precisely named Task Group 52.13 had maneuvered into night cruising disposition, forming a circular screen around the three escort carriers.

Liscome Bay was in the middle, as guide for the surrounding ships. In the first circle surrounding Liscome Bay were battleships New Mexico and Mississippi, the cruiser Baltimore on the left flank, and Coral Sea and Corregidor on the right flank. The outer circle was formed by the destroyers Hoel, Franks, Hughes, Maury and Hull.

The task group, commanded by Rear Adm. Robert M. Griffin on the New Mexico, steamed at 15 knots, without zigzagging, throughout the night 20 miles southwest of Makin.

At 0400, the destroyer Hull left the task group and proceeded to Makin. Hull had been operating off Liscome Bay‘s starboard rear quarter, so her departure did not alter the task group’s disposition.

At 0435, the Franks, also operating off Liscome Bay‘s starboard side, reported a dim light on the surface in the distance and was directed to investigate.

A minute later, New Mexico‘s surface search radar picked up a radar contact six miles from the formation-‘apparently closing,’ in the words of the official report. A few moments later the contact faded from the radar screen without any identification being made.

On Liscome Bay, preparations were being made to launch the day’s first aircraft. For the carrier’s crew and the men of VC-39, the past three days had been hectic, and they expected the 24th to be the same.

Today was also the eve of Thanksgiving. Down in the galleys, the cooks broke out the frozen turkeys that had been packed aboard at Pearl Harbor. There was a lot of work ahead if the traditional meal was to be done up right.

At 0450 flight quarters were sounded. The deck crew began manhandling 13 planes into position on the flight deck in preparation for a dawn launch, while seven planes rested on the hangar deck, armed but not fueled, ready for later launch. Stowed in the carrier’s magazine were more than 200,000 pounds of bombs, including nine 2,000-pound, semi-armor-piercing bombs, 78 1,000-pound bombs, 96 500-pound bombs and a large number of torpedo warheads.

At 0505 Liscome Bay‘s crew was called to general quarters. Dawn was only 30 minutes away as pilots and aircrewmen climbed into their planes.

Five minutes later, Rear Adm. Griffin ordered the task group to turn northeast. Liscome Bay, as guide of the formation, started her turn, followed by the other ships. The formation was a bit ragged because of the absence of the two destroyers, so Admiral Griffin ordered the remaining destroyers to close up the gap left by the Franks‘ departure.

Not far away, hidden by the blackness of night, lay the Japanese submarine I-175, under the command of Lt. Cmdr. Sumano Tabata. Having approached Task Group 52.13 on the surface to avoid detection, Tabata found that his submarine was perfectly positioned to attack through the hole left in the outer circle by the double departure of Hull and Franks. With the American ships now turning toward him, no zigzagging, at 15 knots, Tabata had a setup that submariners dream of.

He made the most of it. Taking a firing bearing on the ships with I-175‘s sound gear, he gave the fateful order-a spread of torpedoes streaked from I-175‘s four bow tubes toward the unsuspecting task group. That done, he took the submarine deep to escape the depth-charging sure to follow.

None of the destroyers in TG 52.13 detected I-175 on sonar, nor did anyone see a torpedo wake on the surface until it was too late.

At 0513, an officer stationed at one of Liscome Bay‘s 40mm guns on the starboard side screamed, ‘Here comes a torpedo!’ into his telephone.

A moment later, it struck the carrier with a shattering roar, throwing up a column of bright orange flame, flecked with white-hot pieces of metal. Seconds later a larger explosion followed, as the torpedo warheads and bombs stowed below the ship’s waterline detonated.

The consecutive explosions hurled large fragments of the ship and the airplanes that had been parked on its flight deck 200 feet into the air. A huge mass of wreckage, thrown into the sea, drifted away from the carrier, burning fiercely. The intensity of the blast stunned lookouts on the surrounding vessels. Debris from the stricken carrier rained down on them. New Mexico, 1,500 yards away, was showered with oil particles, burning deck fragments 3 feet long, molten metal droplets, bits of clothing and human flesh.

The destroyer Maury, 5,000 yards astern, was also splattered. The flames from Liscome Bay were so intense they lighted up the sea around the task group and were seen from the battleship Pennsylvania near Makin, 16 miles away.

Liscome Bay had been hit in the worst possible spot-the bomb stowage area, which had no protection from a torpedo hit or fragment damage. The bombs stowed there had detonated en masse. The resulting explosion disintegrated half of the ship. No one aft of the forward bulkhead of the after engine room survived. In an instant, the interior of the aft portion of the carrier blazed with blast-furnace intensity.

Few survived on the flight deck. The blast caught most, flying shrapnel cut down the others.

Flaming material was flung the length of the hangar deck and into the forward elevator well. The hangar deck became a roaring wall of flame.

The blast sent the ship’s bullhorn and radar antenna crashing down on the bridge, killing two men. Lieutenant Gardner Smith, a radio announcer before the war, went to the open bridge looking for Captain Wiltse and found it a shambles. Two sailors were pinned alive beneath the bullhorn Smith had to try several times before he could free them.

Tremendous waves of heat engulfed the carrier’s island, making the bridge rails too hot to touch. From the nearby Corregidor, Liscome Bay‘s bridge seemed to ‘glow a cherry red.’ The heat abated for a moment, and the men threw knotted lines over the bridge railing on the island’s inboard side and scrambled down to the flight deck.

Marshall U. Beebe, commander of VC-39, had been in the head when the torpedo hit. ‘There was a terrific rumbling throughout the ship, and an explosion that lifted me off the deck. The next thing I knew I was trying to get out the door in the darkness, but I could find no passage….’

Beebe somehow made it to the flight deck and found it ablaze, with oil burning on the water near the bow, and nearby ammunition beginning to explode.

Captain Wiltse ordered all hands to go as far aft as possible, then go over the side. On his way aft he met Beebe, and they proceeded aft along the remains of a catwalk. ‘The fire was spreading rapidly,’ Beebe recalled, ‘making it apparent that we weren’t going to get very far. I called to the captain to go over at this point, but he did not answer….’ Wiltse instead disappeared into the mass of flame and smoke, never to be seen again.

Beebe lowered himself into the water by a line running from the catwalk, holding an uninflated life raft he had found. Unable to maintain his grip on the line due to an injury to his left arm, Beebe fell heavily into the water and surfaced next to the raft, where two of his pilots joined him. They pushed the raft 200 yards from the carrier before inflating it.

All over the ship, crewmen realized that it was hopeless to try fighting the raging fires without water pressure in the fire mains, and they began to abandon ship. One sailor, trapped below decks, groped his way to a ladder so overcrowded he could not go up. He then climbed a superheated steam pipe, burning both his hands.

Another climbed 40 feet up electrical wires to a gun plot before jumping overboard. A pilot, Frank Sistrunk, of VC-39, recovering from an appendectomy done only six days earlier, and no swimmer, jumped overboard and managed to make it to a life raft several hundred yards away with the help of his friends and a small piece of floating debris.

Other VC-39 pilots, scheduled for a later flight, had been asleep when the torpedo hit. The explosion trapped some in their bunks temporarily and threw some out of theirs. Like most survivors, they had to crawl through the jumble of wreckage scattered throughout the ship before going over the side. Fifteen VC-39 pilots were later picked up by destroyers. Fourteen others had died in their planes when the aft flight deck disappeared in the fireball caused by the torpedo.

The fate of Admiral Henry Mullinnix is unknown. He was in air plot when the torpedo struck and was apparently injured by the blast. Several men remembered seeing him seated at a desk, head cradled on his folded arms others recalled seeing him swimming away from the ship after it went down. In any event, he did not survive.

John Crommelin, Admiral Mullinnix’s chief of staff, was stepping out of the shower when Liscome Bay exploded. ‘The violent shaking knocked me off my bare feet,’ he recalled, ‘and I hit the deck. The lights went out but flames lighted the ship’s interior instantly….’

Naked, Crommelin fought his way through burning compartments of the flight deck. ‘I felt like a fool-caught stark naked when even a boot [recruit] knows one should be protected against fire. My fingers looked like boiled wieners popped open.’ He received burns on the right side of his face, legs and arms. Despite this, he took charge of the men in his area and directed the evacuation at that point before jumping overboard himself.

‘I jumped off the flight deck with less than I was born with,’ he later said, ‘on account of the fact I left part of my hide behind.’ Crommelin swam for nearly an hour, supported only by a cork float, before being rescued, still stark naked. In Liscome Bay‘s final moments, the ship’s senior medical officer, Lt. Cmdr. John B. Rowe, displayed what survivors called’splendid’ conduct in his concern for the safety of his patients and in administering to the wounded aboard a rescue ship, despite a leg injury of his own.

Rowe rushed into the operating room to prepare his patients for evacuation. The flight deck was ablaze, and Dr. Rowe made a number of trips back and forth through the sick bay, forming his group for evacuation and picking up first aid gear. Rowe’s group grew to 15 men, including the ships’ damage control officer, Lt. Cmdr. Welles W. ‘Buzz’ Carroll, who refused Rowe’s offer to dress his wounds, and Liscome Bay‘s chaplain, Lt. j.g. Robert H. Carley.

Chaplain Carley, like Beebe, had been in the head when the blast came. Carley picked himself up from the jumble of smashed sinks, toilets and urinals, and staggered out into the passageway. There he joined up with Dr. Rowe and his group.

Carroll and his men attempted to fight the fires they saw flickering through holes in the overhead, but were unable to get any water pressure in the fire main. Giving that up, Carroll and his men groped their way through smoke-filled passages and joined Rowe and Carley’s party.

The group clambered over piles of debris and squeezed through passageways crushed inward like tin cans until they reached the forward elevator well, where a sailor named Hunt was trying to extinguish the blaze with portable CO2 bottles. Seeing that Hunt’s efforts were useless, Carroll told him to get out before he was trapped, but Hunt refused to leave and returned to his firefighting.

The group climbed to the flight deck. To them the scene was Dante’s Inferno brought to life. The fire was roaring so loudly that men had to shout to be heard. Constant explosions of ammunition added to the tumult.

Three men huddled around a 20mm gun made no reply when Carley told them to abandon ship-they were dead. Three other sailors standing numbly nearby ‘woke up’ when they heard Carley’s order and slid down a rope into the water, followed by Carley.

Carroll, although weakening due to blood loss from his injuries, paced up and down the flight deck giving orders and helping men to abandon ship.

Carroll refused to leave the ship until Seaman Hunt (who had come up from below after giving up his firefighting efforts) told him that he would not leave without him. Medical officer Rowe, Carroll and Hunt all went over the side together. Once they were in the water, Hunt swam off to find a raft for the injured Carroll, while Rowe held his head out of the water. Hunt returned with a raft a short time later and asked how the commander was. Rowe looked down at the man he was holding. ‘He’s dead,’ he said and let Carroll’s body slip beneath the water.

Twenty-three minutes after the torpedo hit, Liscome Bay sank stern first, still burning furiously. ‘Looking like a gigantic Fourth of July display,’ said one survivor.

‘I watched her go,’ said aerographer Lyle D. Blakely, ‘and heard her death gurgle. There was no suction, only a loud hissing.’

Liscome Bay went down gracefully,’ said Commander Beebe. ‘Settling by the stern, going down fast, and sliding backwards. Her final farewell was an audible hiss as the white hot metal cooled. The ships’ bow was enveloped by a cloud of steam obliterating our view.’

Liscome Bay was gone, taking with her Admiral Mullinnix, Captain Wiltse, 51 other officers and 591 enlisted men. Only 55 officers and 217 enlisted men, many badly injured with shattered limbs, frightful burns, and severe concussions from the enormous blast, had survived.

They were rescued from the oil-thick water-many clinging to life rafts, bits of wreckage, or floating in kapok life jackets — primarily by the destroyers Morris and Hughes. The destroyers picked up the last few by 0730. Morris and Hughes then transferred them to the transports Neville and Leonard Wood, anchored in Makin lagoon.

Neville and Leonard Wood set out for Pearl Harbor with the Liscome Bay‘s survivors on November 25, arriving December 2, 1943, after an eight-day voyage.

The same day, the Navy Department issued an epitaph of sorts for CE-56: ‘The USS LISSCOME BAY (an escort carrier) was sunk as a result of being torpedoed by a submarine on November 24, 1943, in the Gilbert Islands area. This is the only ship lost in the Gilbert Islands operation.

‘The next of kin of casualties aboard the Liscome Bay will be notified as soon as possible.’

This article was written by William B. Allmon and originally appeared in the July 1992 issue of World War II. For more great articles subscribe to World War II magazine today!


World War II Database


ww2dbase USS Luce was commissioned into service in Jun 1943. Based out of Attu, Aleutian Islands in the North Pacific starting in late 1943, she engaged in anti-submarine patrols off Attu and participated in three raids in the Kurile Islands, sinking a Japanese freighter during the first raid off Paramushiru. From late 1944 into 1945, she supported the invasions in the Philippine Islands, Huon Gulf in Australian Territory of New Guinea, and Okinawa in Japan. Off Okinawa, she was targeted by two Japanese special attack aircraft on 4 May 1945. She was able to down the first, but only when the aircraft had already closed in, thus the blast of the explosion still caused general power failures aboard the ship. Moments later, she was struck by the second special attack aircraft in the aft section on the port side, knocking out the port engine, jamming the rudder, and causing flooding. When the list became too significant, the commanding officer gave the order to abandon ship. She exploded as she sank. Of the 312 on board, 126 were killed in the attack and the sinking.

ww2dbase Source: Wikipedia

Last Major Revision: Nov 2014

Destroyer Luce (DD-522) Interactive Map

Luce Operational Timeline

24 Aug 1942 The keel of destroyer Luce was laid down at Bethlehem Mariners Harbor, Staten Island, New York, United States.
6 Mar 1943 Destroyer Luce was launched at Bethlehem Mariners Harbor, Staten Island, New York, United States. She was sponsored by the wife of Stephen B. Luce, Jr., who was the grandson of Rear Admiral Stephen B. Luce, who in turn was the namesake of the ship.
21 Jun 1943 USS Luce was commissioned into service with Commander Donald C. Varian in command.
5 Sep 1943 USS Luce departed New York, New York, United States.
28 Oct 1943 USS Luce arrived at Bremerton, Washington, United States.
1 Nov 1943 USS Luce departed Bremerton, Washington, United States.
22 Nov 1943 Commander Hinton A. Owens relieved Commander Donald C. Varian as the commanding officer of USS Luce at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
24 Nov 1943 USS Luce departed Hawaiian Islands waters.
30 Nov 1943 USS Luce began a period of anti-submarine patrol off Attu in the Aleutian Islands.
31 Jan 1944 USS Luce completed a period of anti-submarine patrol off Attu in the Aleutian Islands.
1 Feb 1944 USS Luce departed Massacre Bay, Attu, Aleutian Islands for Paramushiru, Kurile Islands.
4 Feb 1944 USS Luce began a period of anti-submarine patrol off Attu in the Aleutian Islands.
13 Jun 1944 USS Luce bombarded Matsuwa (Matua), Kurile Islands.
26 Jun 1944 USS Luce bombarded Paramushiru (Paramushir), Kurile Islands.
8 Aug 1944 USS Luce completed a period of anti-submarine patrol off Attu in the Aleutian Islands and departed for San Francisco, California, United States.
31 Aug 1944 USS Luce arrived at Pearl Harbor, US Territory of Hawaii.
11 Oct 1944 USS Luce departed Manus, Admiralty Islands.
1 Nov 1944 USS Luce departed Manus, Admiralty Islands.
18 Dec 1944 USS Luce supported landing operations training at Huon Gulf, Australian New Guinea.
27 Dec 1944 USS Luce departed Huon Gulf, Australian New Guinea.
9 Jan 1945 USS Luce arrived at Lingayen Gulf, Philippine Islands. She shot down a Japanese aircraft while in the gulf. She set sail toward San Pedro Bay later in the day.
16 Jan 1945 USS Luce arrived at San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands.
25 Jan 1945 USS Luce departed San Pedro Bay, Philippine Islands.
30 Jan 1945 USS Luce departed for Mindoro, Philippine Islands.
1 Feb 1945 Commander Jacob Wilson Waterhouse relieved Commander Hinton A. Owens as the commanding officer of USS Luce at Mangarin Bay, Mindoro, Philippines.
2 Feb 1945 USS Luce began escorting transport ships between Subic Bay and San Pedro Bay in the Philippine Islands.
24 Mar 1945 USS Luce departed Philippine waters to escort ships which were sailing for Kelse Shima, Ryukyu Islands.
1 Apr 1945 USS Luce patrolled waters off Okinawa, Japan.
4 May 1945 USS Luce was attacked by two Japanese special attack aircraft off Okinawa, Japan. The first was shot down near the port side of the ship, and the blast of the explosion caused power failures throughout the ship. The second aircraft crashed into the aft portion of the destroyer, knocking out the port engine, jamming the rudder, and flooding engineering spaces. The commanding officer gave the order to abandon ship at 0814 hours. Of the 312 on board, 126 were killed in the attack and the sinking.

Did you enjoy this article or find this article helpful? If so, please consider supporting us on Patreon. Even $1 per month will go a long way! Thank you.

Share this article with your friends:

Visitor Submitted Comments

1. Mikki says:
1 May 2012 05:39:11 PM

Seeking list of sailors who did not survive the sinknig of the destroyer USS Luce in 1945.

I am putting together a short family history for my children as to their fathers side of the family. He lost a brother on the USS Luce and I would like to know more about what his rank was and what he did while on board.

Thanks to anyone who could help.

2. neil shattuck says:
27 May 2012 07:18:59 AM

My uncle Robert Shattuck was killed on the luce

3. Fred Davis says:
25 May 2013 08:58:33 PM

My uncle James Appicelli CMM was killed on the Luce
James was in the after engine room where one of the planes hit.There is a book that I have that tells everything that happened that day. It is DD 522 Diary of a Destroyer by Ron Surels Every Memorial day I honor the Luce and its crew by wearing a Luce
baseball hat.I will never forget the men who were lost and those that survived. They were all heroes!!

4. James Robert Appleby says:
29 Sep 2014 04:22:10 PM

My Grandfather, James L. Appleby was also killed in the aft engine room. I am looking for like people who can tell me more. Thanks
Rob Appleby
[email protected]
352-613-3806

5. Trish says:
14 Oct 2015 04:24:04 AM

My grandfathers was a survivor on the Luce, John Welsh. A book was written about it that might mention your relatives. DD 522: Diary of a destroyer : the action saga of the USS Luce from the Aleutian and Philippine campaigns to her sinking off Okinawa Hardcover – 1994
by Ron Surels (Author)

6. Phil Becker says:
31 Oct 2015 12:46:54 PM

I served on Luce as s/1c for only about a year--While in the Atlantic we escorted the- Queen Mary from the coast of Ireland to Halifax Nova Scotia with Winston Churchill on her as a passenger Admiral King was also on board -we also screened the Enterprise on her shake down to Trinidad. Also almost hit a tug towing a target with 5inch fire.

7. kenneth says:
7 Dec 2015 07:40:42 AM

my great uncle frank machacek went down with the ship that day. he could have gotten off the ship but he went back down to save his buddies, god bless him. thank you for your courage and sacrifice uncle frank.

8. maura fischer bunge says:
6 Feb 2016 01:03:14 PM

My grandfather, Walter Fischer went down with the ship. Stayed back to save others, Received the Bronze Star.

9. Debi Reep says:
18 Apr 2016 04:57:35 PM

My father who is turning 90 this year is a survivor of the USS Luce. Looking for any other survivors still alive.

10. Neil Shattuck says:
23 May 2016 07:10:47 PM

Debi Reep
My Uncle Robert L Shattuck went missing on that day the ship went down, anything your father remembers about the crew and ship I would love to know.
Neil Shattuck
[email protected]
I'm watching a documentary tonight on Okinawa and kamikaze attacks. It made me come to this page again.
God Bless those men, they are and were all heros.

11. Maura Fischer Bunge says:
29 May 2016 03:27:05 PM

Debi Deep
Please ask your father if he knew Walter Fischer, Cheif Torpedoman. He was killed when the Luxe went down. Thank you!
Maura Bunge
[email protected]

12. Michael Powers says:
30 May 2016 05:19:03 AM

My uncle Arthur Powers also went down with his crewmates. Rest in Peace

13. Mike says:
13 Jul 2017 11:09:19 PM

My brother was on the Luce, survived and passed a few years back at the age of 85.
He told me that he's always thought of the Corsair as his "Blue Angels" because he watched them flying cover for him while he was floating in the water after the sinking.
Does anyone know which Marine group that might have been?

14. Connie Maxwell says:
20 Aug 2017 01:08:16 PM

My father, James Maxwell, was a crew member that survived the sinking of the Luce but never really recovered mentally from the experience. He was 17 at the time of the sinking, having lied about his age to join the Navy. Can't even imagine! His mother was initially notified that he had died and when he really did die at age 42 when he was hit by a drunk driver, she said, "could it be another mistake?" One of the saddest things I have ever witnessed. It wasn't a mistake this time. He left six children.

15. Connie Maxwell says:
20 Aug 2017 01:12:31 PM

Debby Deep:
Did your dad know Jimmy Maxwell?

16. Tracy says:
2 Sep 2017 04:52:22 AM

I saw "Dunkirk" last night and it was so upsetting prompted me to start Googling to get more info on my dad's ship that sunk in World War II. That ship turned out to be the Luce. He was wounded but did survive. Spent months in a hospital in Oakland, CA. I was a second family so he was a much older dad and never talked about his experience. He had a lot of anger. I would love to find out more details of exactly what happened the day the ship sunk. Those men were all so brave.

17. Debi Reep says:
6 Nov 2017 03:16:44 PM

My father was on the Luce when it sunk. He was 19 at the time, today he’s 91. I’ve also tried to find out more information because my dad doesn’t talk about it much. There was a book written about it-it’s out of print. But I was able to purchase it on Amazon.

18. Jerry Lietz says:
31 May 2018 04:43:55 PM

My father was also a survivor of the Luce, There is an excellent book written by Ron Surels titled DD 522: Diary of a Destroyer.It is told through interviews with the actual crew members of the ship.

19. Terry says:
8 Dec 2018 05:47:15 AM

My uncle, Christian, was killed on this ship. If any of the survivors are still living and knew him I would enjoy hearing about him.

20. Anonymous says:
20 Jan 2019 05:03:12 PM

My Uncle John Herzog was a Survivor of the USS Luce. He passed away in 2006. He was a very good swimmer. My cousin told me of stories of what he went thru then and thru his life. I was told when they abandoned ship the ship was already starting to list. He did a cannon ball into the water and had to swim away from ship. He said he remembered a cook clinging to one of the mast as ship went down. Just when he thought he was clear he noticed sharks in area and swam towards oil slick left from ship. Not only did you have to worry about Sharks the Japanese we’re trying to shoot them while in the water. Luckily American planes came and the rest is History.

21. Anonymous says:
12 Feb 2019 03:27:13 PM

My grandfather, Robert Brown, was a survivor of the USS Luce. I wish I came across this page before his passing a few years back. Like many others he didn't talk about his experience much, but when I needed to interview someone who lived through World War 2 for history class he was able to recall the experience in great detail. Like others had noted, he also lied about his age and was 17. He recalled it being every man for themselves at the time the ship was going down. He stated that people were being trampled on the stairs. He had to come all the way up from the fire room. He was lucky enough to make it to the deck and only needed to step off into the water. He recalled there being sharks all around but said they worked together floating on driftwood and all kicked in unison when a shark came by. My grandfather received the purple heart after that day, his stomach was effected by the depth chargers going off. Thank you for the book recommendation!

22. Anonymous says:
16 Feb 2019 04:12:09 PM

My uncle, William Murgatroyd was killed on the ship. He worked in the sick bay

23. Anonymous says:
11 Nov 2019 07:27:49 AM

My dad Robert D. Harrison RM1 (P1) was a survivor of the USS Luce.

24. DAR member says:
18 Jan 2020 05:34:05 PM

We had the pleasure of having another Luce survivor speak to our Chapter today. Chief Petty Officer Jim Phillips was given a Quilt of Valor today from a very grateful group.
It was such an honor to meet him.

25. SD says:
24 May 2020 03:20:09 PM

My Uncle Robert Sherman was KIA aboard the Luce. Does any of the survivors remember him?

26. ls says:
15 Dec 2020 11:21:47 AM

my uncle urstle keck was KIA aboard luce. wondering if any survivors can provide information about him.

27. stephen gladieux says:
22 Mar 2021 06:54:16 PM

Does anyone remember The duke.
He was 3rd class radioman
real name was calvin newlon. he was 20 years old. KIA. Would love to chat by phone or email.
Please anyone? anyone?

28. Matt Studer says:
23 Mar 2021 09:50:17 PM

My Uncle Mike J Studer was KIA on the Luce and I was given some great letters from my other Uncle about this fateful time

I am planning to share this with my other family members and am reaching out to anyone else connected to this ship

29. Derry Kate Moll says:
26 Mar 2021 11:52:00 AM

My Father was a Lt.Cmmdr in the Navy on DD522. Derry Oakley Moll. I wonder if anyone remembers him ?

30. Matt Studer says:
1 Apr 2021 05:38:06 PM

An old friend of mine was able to give me the action report of the final days of the Luce and the Casualty List.

All visitor submitted comments are opinions of those making the submissions and do not reflect views of WW2DB.


USS Mobile (CL-63) in San Francisco Bay, late 1945 - History

USS Shangri-La, an aircraft carrier, was laid down by the Norfolk Navy Yard, at Portsmouth, Va., on January 15, 1943, launched on February 24, 1944, sponsored by Mrs. James H. Doolittle, and commissioned on September 15, 1944, Capt. James D. Barner in command.

USS Shangri-La completed fitting out at Norfolk and took her shakedown cruise to Trinidad, B.W.I., between September 15 and December 21, 1944, at which time she returned to Norfolk. On January 17, 1945, she stood out of Hampton Roads, formed up with the large cruiser USS Guam (CB 2) and USS Harry E. Hubbard (DD 748), and sailed for Panama. The three ships arrived at Cristobal, C.Z., on the 23rd and transited the canal on the 24th. Shangri-La departed from Balboa, C.Z., on January 25 and arrived at San Diego, Calif., on February 4. There she loaded passengers, stores, and extra planes for transit to Hawaii and got underway on February 7. Upon her arrival at Pearl Harbor on February 15, she commenced two months of duty, qualifying land-based Navy pilots in carrier landings.

On April 10, 1945, she weighed anchor for Ulithi Atoll where she arrived ten days later. After an overnight stay in the lagoon, USS Shangri-La departed Ulithi in company with USS Haggard (DD 555) and USS Stembel (DD 644) to report for duty with Vice Adm. Marc A. Mitscher's Fast Carrier Task Force. On April 24th, she joined Task Group 58.4 while it was conducting a fueling rendezvous with TG 50.8. The next day, Shangri-La and her air group, CVG-85, launched their first strike against the Japanese. The target was Okino Daito Jima, a group of islands several hundred miles to the southeast of Okinawa. Her planes successfully destroyed radar and radio installations there and, upon their recovery, the task group sailed for Okinawa. Shangri-La supplied combat air patrols for the task group and close air support for the 10th Army on Okinawa before returning to Ulithi on May 14.

While at Ulithi, USS Shangri-La became the flagship of the 2nd Carrier Task Force. Vice Adm. John S McCain hoisted his flag in Shangri-La on May 18, 1945. Six days later, TG 58.4, with Shangri-La in company, sortied from the lagoon. On May 28, TG 58.4 became TG 38.4 and Vice Adm. McCain relieved Vice Adm. Mitscher as Commander, Task Force 38, retaining USS Shangri-La as his flagship. On June 2 and 3rd, the task force launched air strikes on the Japanese home islands - aimed particularly at Kyushu, the southernmost of the major islands. Facing the stiffest airborne resistance to date, Shangri-La's airmen suffered their heaviest casualties.

On June 4 and 5th, she moved off to the northwest to avoid a typhoon then, on the 6th, her planes returned to close air support duty over Okinawa. On the 8th, her air group hit Kyushu again, and, on the following day, they came back to Okinawa. On June 10, 1945, the task force cleared Okinawa for Leyte, conducting drills en route. USS Shangri-La entered Leyte Gulf and anchored in San Pedro Bay on June 13. She remained at anchor there for the rest of June, engaged in upkeep and recreation. On July 1, USS Shangri-La got underway from Leyte to return to the combat zone. On July 2, the oath of office of Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Air was administered to John L. Sullivan on board Shangri-La, the first ceremony of its type ever undertaken in a combat zone. Eight days later, her air group commenced a series of air strikes against Japan which lasted until the capitulation on August 15.

Shangri-La's planes ranged the length of the island chain during these raids. On July 10, they attacked Tokyo, the first raid there since the strikes of the previous February. On July 14 and 15th, they pounded Honshu and Hokkaido and, on the 18th, returned to Tokyo, also bombing battleship Nagato, moored close to shore at Yokosuka. From July 20-22, USS Shangri-La joined the logistics group for fuel, replacement aircraft, and mail. By the 24th, her pilots were attacking shipping in the vicinity of Kure. They returned the next day for a repeat performance, before departing for a two-day replenishment period on the 26th and 27th. On the following day, Shangri-La's aircraft damaged cruiser Oyoda, and battleship Haruna, the latter so badly that she beached and flooded. She later had to be abandoned. They pummeled Tokyo again on July 30, then cleared the area to replenish on July 31 and August 1.

USS Shangri-La spent the next four days in the retirement area waiting for a typhoon to pass. On August 9, after heavy fog had caused the cancellation of the previous day's missions, the carrier sent her planes aloft to bomb Honshu and Hokkaido once again. The next day, they raided Tokyo and central Honshu, then retired from the area for logistics. She evaded another typhoon on August 11 and 12th, then hit Tokyo again on the 13th. After replenishing on the 14th, she sent planes to strike the airfields around Tokyo on the morning of August 15, 1945. Soon thereafter, Japan's capitulation was announced and the fleet was ordered to cease hostilities. USS Shangri-La steamed around in the strike area from August 15-23, patrolling the Honshu area on the latter date. Between August 23rd and September 16, her planes sortied on missions of mercy, air-dropping supplies to Allied prisoners of war in Japan.

USS Shangri-La entered Tokyo Bay on September 16, almost two weeks after the surrender ceremony on board USS Missouri (BB 63), and remained there until October 1st. Departing Japan, she arrived at Okinawa on 4th stayed until the 6th, and then headed for the United States in company with Task Unit 38.1.1. She sailed into San Pedro Bay, Calif., on October 21st and stayed at Long Beach for three weeks. On November 5, she shifted to San Diego, departing that port a month later for Bremerton, Wash. She entered Puget Sound on December 9, underwent availability until the 30th, and then returned to San Diego.

Upon her return, USS Shangri-La began normal operations out of San Diego, primarily engaged in pilot carrier landing qualifications. In May 1946, she sailed for the Central Pacific to participate in Operation Crossroads, the atomic bomb tests conducted at Bikini Atoll. Following this, she made a brief training cruise to Pearl Harbor, then wintered at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. In March 1947, she deployed again, calling at Pearl Harbor and Sydney, Australia. When she returned to the United States, Shangri-La was decommissioned and placed in the Reserve Fleet at San Francisco on November 7, 1947.

USS Shangri-La recommissioned on May 10, 1951, Capt. Francis L. Busey in command. For the next year, she conducted training and readiness operations out of Boston, Mass. Reclassified an attack aircraft carrier, CVA 38, in 1952, she returned to Puget Sound that fall and decommissioned again on November 14, this time for modernization at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard.

During the next two years, she received an angled flight deck, twin steam catapults, and her aircraft elevators and arresting gear were overhauled. At a cost of approximately $7 million, she was virtually a new ship when she commissioned for the third time on January 10, 1955, Capt. Roscoe L. Newman commanding.

She conducted intensive fleet training for the remainder of 1955, then deployed to the Far East on January 5, 1956. On September 2, 1956, the second day of the National Air Show, Lt. (j.g.) R. Carson, flying an F3H-2N Demon of VF-124, captured the McDonnell Trophy with a non-stop, non-refueling flight from USS Shangri-La off the coast of San Francisco to Oklahoma City. Lt.(j.g.) Carson covered the 1,436 miles in two hours 32 minutes 13.45 seconds for an average speed of 566.007 mph.

On March 16, 1960, she put to sea from San Diego en route to her new home port, Mayport, Fla. She entered Mayport after visits to Callao, Peru Valparaiso, Chile Port of Spain, Trinidad Bayonne, N.J. and Norfolk, Va.

April 7, 1960 Shangri-La suffers an explosion of an air separator operated by a gasoline motor while, injuring three.

After six weeks of underway training in the local operating area around Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, she embarked upon her first Atlantic deployment, a NATO exercise followed by liberty in Southampton, England. Almost immediately after her return to Mayport, USS Shangri-La was ordered back to sea, this time to the Caribbean in response to trouble in Guatemala and Nicaragua. She returned to Mayport on November 25, 1960 and remained in port for more than two months.

Between 1961 and 1970, USS Shangri-La alternated between deployments to the Mediterranean and operations in the western Atlantic, out of Mayport. She sailed east for her first tour of duty with the 6th Fleet on February 2, 1961. On June 1, Shangri-La, along with USS Intrepid (CV 11) and USS Randolph (CV 15), was ordered to stand by off southern Hispaniola when a general uprising seemed about to follow the assasination of President Trujillo of the Domincan Republic.

She returned to the United States that fall and entered the New York Naval Shipyard. Back in Mayport by the beginning of 1962, Shangri-La stood out again for the Mediterranean on February 7, 1962. After about six months of cruising with the 6th Fleet, she departed the Mediterranean in mid-August and arrived in Mayport on the 28th.

Following a month's stay at her home port, the aircraft carrier headed for New York and a major overhaul. USS Shangri-La was modified extensively during her stay in the yard. Four of her 5-inch mounts were removed, but she received a new air search and height finding radar and a new arrester system. In addition, much of her electrical and engineering equipment was renovated. After sea trials and visits to Bayonne, N.J., and Norfolk, Va., USS Shangri-La returned to Mayport for a week in late March 1963 then put to sea for operations in the Caribbean. Eight months of similar duty followed before Shangri-La weighed anchor for another deployment. On October 1, 1963, she headed back to the 6th Fleet for a seven-month tour.

Shangri-La continued her 2nd and 6th Fleet assignments for the next six years. During the winter of 1964 and the spring of 1965, she underwent another extensive overhaul, this time at Philadelphia, then resumed operations as before.

August 26, 1965 USS Shangri-la and USS Newman K. Perry (DD 883) collide off Sardinia, killing one sailor and injuring another on the destroyer. The Perry's bow is crushed and twisted to starboard. Both ships are repaired at Naples and return to duty with the Sixth Fleet.

On June 30, 1969, she was redesignated an antisubmarine warfare aircraft carrier CVS 38.

January 10, 1970 Shangri-La suffers a fire during training when an A-4 Skyhawk aircraft parked on the flight deck ignites, killing one.

In 1970, USS Shangri-La returned to the western Pacific after an absence of ten years. She got underway from Mayport on March 5, stopped at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from the 13th to the 16th, and headed east through the Atlantic and Indian oceans. She arrived in Subic Bay, R.P., on April 4th and, during the next seven months, launched combat sorties from Yankee station. Her tours of duty on Yankee station were punctuated by frequent logistics trips to Subic Bay, by visits to Manila, R.P., and Hong Kong, B.C.C., in October, and by 12 days in drydock at Yokosuka, Japan, in July.

On November 9, 1970, Shangri-La stood out of Subic Bay to return home. En route to Mayport, she visited Sydney, Australia Wellington, N.Z. and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. She arrived in Mayport on December 16 and began preparations for inactivation. After pre-inactivation overhaul at the Boston Naval Shipyard, South Annex, USS Shangri-La decommissioned on July 30, 1971. She was placed in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet and berthed at Philadelphia

USS Shangri-La remained in the reserve fleet for the next 11 years, and was stricken from the Navy List on July 15, 1982. On August 9, 1988, she was disposed of by the Marine Administration.


Watch the video: Austal USA - USS Mobile LCS 26 Christening


Comments:

  1. Malabei

    Bravo, science fiction))))

  2. Yossel

    Gonivo

  3. Voodoomi

    I congratulate, very good idea



Write a message