Rodman DD- 456 - History

Rodman DD- 456 - History


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Rodman

(DD-456: dp. 1,630; 1. 347'10"; b. 36'; dr. 14' (mean); cpl.270;a.4 5'', 41.1'', 520mm.,5 21'' tt.,6dcp 2dct;cl. Gleaves)

Rodman (DD-456) was laid down 16 December 1940 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N. J.; launched 26 September 1941; sponsored by Mrs. Albert K. Stebbins, Jr., grandniece of Admiral Rodman, and commissioned 27 January 1942, Comdr. W. G. Miehelet in command.

Following shakedown, Rodman, assigned to TF 22, alternated training and patrol duties at Argentia with screening and plane guard services for Ranger (CV 4) as that carrier trained aviation personnel along the northeast U.S. coast and ferried planes of the Army's 33d Pursuit Squadron to Aeera on the Gold Coast from 22 April to 28 May 1942. Detsehed in June, she departed Newport 1 July, escorted a seven-troopship convoy to the Firth of Clyde, then continued on to the Orkneys where as a unit of TF 99, she commenced operations with the British Home Fleet. Based at Seapa Flow into August, she alternated patrols from Scotland and Ieeland to protect the southern legs of the PQ QP convoy lanes between those two countries and the north Russian ports of Murmansk and Arehangel. With the long summer days, however, the U-boats and Norwegian based Luftwaffe units continued to exact a heavy toll. In early July, they destroyed Convoy PQ 17. Further convoys were postponed until the relative cover of the Arctic winter darkness could be regained.

Operation "Easy Unit" then eame into being. Toward the end of July, Rodman was designated to assist in filling the increasing immediate logistics demands of the Russians, and of British and American personnel in northern Russia, and to prepare for bases, men, and equipment to provide air cover for the convoys when they resumed. On 17 August Rodman, with Tuscaloosa (CA-37) and two other American destroyers departed Seapa Flow carrying medical personnel and supplies men, and equipment for the RAF's number 144 and 145 Hampden Squadrons, ammunition, pyroteehnies, radar gear drystores, and provisions. Following the route taken by British destroyers 3 weeks earlier, they entered Kola Inlet after dark on the 23d. The kuftwaffe was grounded. The ships offloaded, refueled, took on merchant sailors—survivors of ill-fated convoys, and departed Vaenga Bay on the 24th.

En route back to Scotland, the American ships were joined by Royal Navy destroyers. On the 25th, the British ships tracked the German minelayer Ulm, one of many ships and boats engaged in planting mines at the entrance to the White Sea and in the shallow waters off Novaya Zemlya, and sank her southeast of Bear Island.

Rodman arrived back in the Firth of Clyde on the 30th and on 1 September got underway for New York. An abbreviated overhaul at Boston followed and, at the end of the month, she resumed training and patrols off the U.S. northeast coast. On 25 October she sortied with TG 34.2 to support the amphibious force of TF 34 in Operation "Torch," the invasion of North Africa. On 7 November, TU 34.2.3., Santee (CVE-29)

Emmons (DD-457), and Rodman left TG 34.2 and screened the Southern Attaek Group to its destination. From then through the 11th, Rodman screened Santee, then put into Safi for replenishment. On the 13th she retired, arrived at Norfolk on the 24th, thence proceeded to Boston where her 1.1-inch battery was replaced hy 40mm. and 20mm. guns.

In December she steamed to the Panama Canal whence she escorted a convoy back to the U.S. east coast, arriving at Norfolk 7 January 1943. The next day she sailed again joining Ranger for two more ferry runs to Africa, this time to Morocco. During March and April, she remained in the western Atlantic, again ranging as far north as Argentia on patrol and escort duty. In May, she returned to the United Kmgdom.

Arriving at Scapa Flow on the 18th, Rodman rejoined the Home Fleet. Into the summer she and her sister ships patrolled out of Scotland and Iceland and screened the larger ships of the combined force, including Duke of York, South Dakota, and A labama, as they attempted to draw the German fleet particularly Tirpitz, out of the protected floods.

With August, Rodman returned to the United States and by 1 September had resumed patrols at Argentia. Detuched in October, she departed Norfolk 3 November for Bermuda whence she sailed in the advance scouting line screening lowa (BB-61) then carrying President Roosevelt on the first leg of his journey to the Teheran Conference. Returning in mid-December, the destroyer guarded carriers on training exercises out of Newport and Portland, Maine, until April 1944. Then, on the 20th, she headed east with other units of her squadron, DesRon 10. On 1 May she arrived at Mers-elKebir, whence she operated as a unit of TG 80.6, a hunterkiller group formed to work with the North African coastal air squadrons against the U-boat menace to shipping in the 325-mile stretch between the Straits of Gibraltar and Oran. The Anglo-American air-sea effort, devised to keep U-boats submerged to the point of exhaustion and then overwhelm them as they surfaced, rcquired time and patience, as well as coordination. It was instrumental in slicing the number of operational U-boats in the Mediterranean by over one-third between March and June.

On 14 May Rodman, with others of her squadron, departed Mers-el-Kebir to track a submarine which had sunk four merchantmen in less than 2 days. A 72 hour air-surface hunt ensued, but on the morning of the 17th, the damaged U - lfi surfaced, was abandoned, and sank. The force picked up survivors and retired to Mers-el-Kebir only to sail for England the following day.

On 22 May Rodman arrived at Plymouth and on the 23d assumed duties as CTU 126.2.1 for Operation "Neptune," the naval phase of "Overlord"—the invasion of France. On the 24th, she conducted shore bombardment exercises. Then she waited. On the 4th the convoy "B-1", formed, headed out across the Channel, and then turned back. On the 5th the convoy again formed and headed east, this time continuing on to France and landing reinforcements on Omaha Beach on the afternoon of the 6th. Rodman, detached on arrival in the assault area, joined TG 122.4 and through the 16th provided gunfire support and patrolled in the Baie de la Seine. Brief respite at Plymouth followed, but on the 18th she returned to the Normandy coast. Back in English waters from the 21st through the 24th, she joined TF 12g on the 25th as that force joined the IX Army Air Force in supporting the 9th, 79th, and 4th Army Divisions closing on Cherbourg.

Rodman returned to England the same day, proeeded to sea again on the 30th; and, after a 3-day stop at Belfast, got underway for the Mediterranean to participate in operation "Dragoon" ("Anvil"), the invasion of southern France Arriving at Mers-el-Kebir 11 July, she was en route to Sicily on the 16th, and into August operated between that island, the coast of Italy, and Malta.

On 11 August, assigned to TU 85.12.4, Rodman sailed from Taranto. Two days later French warships joined the formation; and on the 15th, the force arrived off the Delta assault area in the Baie de Bougnon. From 0430 to 0641, Rodman covered the minecraft sweeping the channels to the beaches. Two hours of shore bombardment followed. She then shifted to call fire support duties, which, with antiaircraft screening duties, she continued until retiring to Palermo on the 17th. Back off southern France on the 22d, she fired on shore batteries at Toulon on the 23d, covered minesweepers in the Golfe de Fos on the 25th, and in the Baie de Marseilles on the 26th. Engaged in screening and patrol duties through the end of the month, she sailed for Oran 2 September and for the next month and a half escorted men and supplies into the assault area.

In late October, Destroyer Squadron 10 escorted a convoy back to the United States. From New York Rodman continued on to Boston for conversion to a destroyer minesweeper. Emerging from the yard as DMS-21 on 16 December, she sailed for Norfolk the following week and on 1 January 1945 got underway for the Pacific. During the remainder of that month and into Februarv, she conducted minesweeping and gunnery exercises off California and in Hawaiian waters, then sailed west. On 12 March she anchored at Ulithi and 7 days later sailed for the Ryukyus and her last amphibious Operation, "Iceberg." On the 24th and 25th she participated in minesweeping operations off Kerama Retto, then prepared for the assault on Okinawa.

After the 1 April landings on the Hagushi beaches, she remained in the area and was caught in the air-surface action which enveloped the island on the 6th. Assigned to picket duty early that day, she later shifted to screening duties and joined Emmons (DMS-22) in covering small mineeraft sweeping the channel between Iheya Retto and Okinawa. In midafternoon a large flight of kamikazes flew over. At 1532 their leader dived out of the clouds and crashed Rodman's port bow. His bomb exploded under her. Sixteen men were killed or missing, 20 were wounded, but Rodman's engineering plant remained intact. Emmons commenced circling Rodman to provide antiaircraft fire as other suicide minded pilots closed in. Six were splashed. Marine Corps Corsairs arrived, joined in, and scored on 20, but not before others got through. Rodman was hit twice more during the 3~-hour battle. Emmons splashed six more, but was crashed by five and damaged by four near misses. Her hulk was sunk the next day.

From 7 April to 5 May Rodman underwent temporary repairs at Ketama Retto, then started her journey back to the United States. Arriving at Charleston 19 June, her repairs were completed in mid-October, and on the 22d she sailed for Caseo Bay for refresher training. For the next 3 years, she operated along the U.S. east coast, ranging from Newfoundland to the Caribbean; then, in September 1949, deployed to the Mediterranean.

There for only 2 weeks, she resumed her western Atlantic operations and during the next 6 years sailed twice more to the Mediterranean, both times for 5-month tours with the 6th Fleet, 2 June to 1 October 1952 and 19 January to 17 May 1954. Reclassified DD-456 on 15 January 1955, she decommissioned 28 Julv 1955 and was transferred the same day to the Republic of China to serve as RCS Hsien Yang (DD-16).

Rodman earned five battle stars during World War II.


Rodman DD- 456 - History

(DD-456: dp. 1,630 l. 347'10" b. 36' dr. 14' (mean) cpl.270a.4 5'', 4 1.1'', 5 20mm.,5 21'' tt.,6 dcp 2 dctcl. Gleaves)

Rodman (DD-456) was laid down 16 December 1940 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N. J. launched 26 September 1941 sponsored by Mrs. Albert K. Stebbins, Jr., grandniece of Admiral Rodman, and commissioned 27 January 1942, Comdr. W. G. Michelet in command.

Following shakedown, Rodman, assigned to TF 22, alternated training and patrol duties at Argentia with screening and plane guard services for Ranger (CV 4) as that carrier trained aviation personnel along the northeast U.S. coast and ferried planes of the Army's 33d Pursuit Squadron to Accra on the Gold Coast from 22 April to 28 May 1942. Detached in June, she departed Newport 1 July, escorted a seven-troopship convoy to the Firth of Clyde, then continued on to the Orkneys where as a unit of TF 99, she commenced operations with the British Home Fleet. Based at Scapa Flow into August, she alternated patrols from Scotland and Iceland to protect the southern legs of the PQ QP convoy lanes between those two countries and the north Russian ports of Murmansk and Archangel. With the long summer days, however, the U-boats and Norwegian based Luftwaffe units continued to exact a heavy toll. In early July, they destroyed Convoy PQ 17. Further convoys were postponed until the relative cover of the Arctic winter darkness could be regained.

Operation "Easy Unit" then came into being. Toward the end of July, Rodman was designated to assist in filling the increasing immediate logistics demands of the Russians, and of British and American personnel in northern Russia, and to prepare for bases, men, and equipment to provide air cover for the convoys when they resumed. On 17 August Rodman, with Tuscaloosa (CA-37) and two other American destroyers departed Scapa Flow carrying medical personnel and supplies men, and equipment for the RAF's number 144 and 145 Hampden Squadrons, ammunition, pyrotechnics, radar gear drystores, and provisions. Following the route taken by British destroyers 3 weeks earlier, they entered Kola Inlet after dark on the 23d. The luftwaffe was grounded. The ships off loaded, refueled, took on merchant sailors survivors of ill-fated convoys, and departed Vaenga Bay on the 24th.

En route back to Scotland, the American ships were joined by Royal Navy destroyers. On the 25th, the British ships tracked the German minelayer Ulm, one of many ships and boats engaged in planting mines at the entrance to the White Sea and in the shallow waters off Novaya Zemlya, and sank her southeast of Bear Island.

Rodman arrived back in the Firth of Clyde on the 30th and on 1 September got underway for New York. An abbreviated overhaul at Boston followed and, at the end of the month, she resumed training and patrols off the U.S. northeast coast. On 25 October she sortied with TG 34.2 to support the amphibious force of TF 34 in Operation "Torch," the invasion of North Africa. On 7 November, TU 34.2.3., Santee (CVE-29) Emmons (DD-457), and Rodman left TG 34.2 and screened the Southern Attack Group to its destination. From then through the 11th, Rodman screened Santee, then put into Safi for replenishment. On the 13th she retired, arrived at Norfolk on the 24th, thence proceeded to Boston where her 1.1-inch battery was replaced by 40mm. and 20mm. guns.

In December she steamed to the Panama Canal whence she escorted a convoy back to the U.S. east coast, arriving at Norfolk 7 January 1943. The next day she sailed again joining Ranger for two more ferry runs to Africa, this time to Morocco. During March and April, she remained in the western Atlantic, again ranging as far north as Argentia on patrol and escort duty. In May, she returned to the United Kingdom.

Arriving at Scapa Flow on the 18th, Rodman rejoined the Home Fleet. Into the summer she and her sister ships patrolled out of Scotland and Iceland and screened the larger ships of the combined force, including Duke of York, South Dakota, and Alabama, as they attempted to draw the German fleet particularly Tirpitz, out of the protected fjords.

With August, Rodman returned to the United States and by 1 September had resumed patrols at Argentia. Detached in October, she departed Norfolk 3 November for Bermuda whence she sailed in the advance scouting line screening lowa (BB-61) then carrying President Roosevelt on the first leg of his journey to the Teheran Conference. Returning in mid-December, the destroyer guarded carriers on training exercises out of Newport and Portland, Maine, until April 1944. Then, on the 20th, she headed east with other units of her squadron, DesRon 10. On 1 May she arrived at Mers-elKebir, whence she operated as a unit of TG 80.6, a hunterkiller group formed to work with the North African coastal air squadrons against the U-boat menace to shipping in the 325-mile stretch between the Straits of Gibraltar and Oran. The Anglo-American air-sea effort, devised to keep U-boats submerged to the point of exhaustion and then overwhelm them as they surfaced, required time and patience, as well as coordination. It was instrumental in slicing the number of operational U-boats in the Mediterranean by over one-third between March and June.

On 14 May Rodman, with others of her squadron, departed Mers-el-Kebir to track a submarine which had sunk four merchantmen in less than 2 days. A 72 hour air-surface hunt ensued, but on the morning of the 17th, the damaged U - 616 surfaced, was abandoned, and sank. The force picked up survivors and retired to Mers-el-Kebir only to sail for England the following day.

On 22 May Rodman arrived at Plymouth and on the 23d assumed duties as CTU 126.2.1 for Operation "Neptune," the naval phase of "Overlord" the invasion of France. On the 24th, she conducted shore bombardment exercises. Then she waited. On the 4th the convoy "B-1", formed, headed out across the Channel, and then turned back. On the 5th the convoy again formed and headed east, this time continuing on to France and landing reinforcements on Omaha Beach on the afternoon of the 6th. Rodman, detached on arrival in the assault area, joined TG 122.4 and through the 16th provided gunfire support and patrolled in the Baie de la Seine. Brief respite at Plymouth followed, but on the 18th she returned to the Normandy coast. Back in English waters from the 21st through the 24th, she joined TF 129 on the 25th as that force joined the IX Army Air Force in supporting the 9th, 79th, and 4th Army Divisions closing on Cherbourg.

Rodman returned to England the same day, preceded to sea again on the 30th and, after a 3-day stop at Belfast, got underway for the Mediterranean to participate in operation "Dragoon" ("Anvil"), the invasion of southern France Arriving at Mers-el-Kebir 11 July, she was en route to Sicily on the 16th, and into August operated between that island, the coast of Italy, and Malta.

On 11 August, assigned to TU 85.12.4, Rodman sailed from Taranto. Two days later French warships joined the formation and on the 15th, the force arrived off the Delta assault area in the Baie de Bougnon. From 0430 to 0641, Rodman covered the minecraft sweeping the channels to the beaches. Two hours of shore bombardment followed. She then shifted to call fire support duties, which, with antiaircraft screening duties, she continued until retiring to Palermo on the 17th. Back off southern France on the 22d, she fired on shore batteries at Toulon on the 23d, covered minesweepers in the Golfe de Fos on the 25th, and in the Baie de Marseilles on the 26th. Engaged in screening and patrol duties through the end of the month, she sailed for Oran 2 September and for the next month and a half escorted men and supplies into the assault area.

In late October, Destroyer Squadron 10 escorted a convoy back to the United States. From New York Rodman continued on to Boston for conversion to a destroyer minesweeper. Emerging from the yard as DMS-21 on 16 December, she sailed for Norfolk the following week and on 1 January 1945 got underway for the Pacific. During the remainder of that month and into February, she conducted minesweeping and gunnery exercises off California and in Hawaiian waters, then sailed west. On 12 March she anchored at Ulithi and 7 days later sailed for the Ryukyus and her last amphibious Operation, "Iceberg." On the 24th and 25th she participated in minesweeping operations off Kerama Retto, then prepared for the assault on Okinawa.

After the 1 April landings on the Hagushi beaches, she remained in the area and was caught in the air-surface action which enveloped the island on the 6th. Assigned to picket duty early that day, she later shifted to screening duties and joined Emmons (DMS-22) in covering small minecraft sweeping the channel between Iheya Retto and Okinawa. In midafternoon a large flight of kamikazes flew over. At 1532 their leader dived out of the clouds and crashed Rodman's port bow. His bomb exploded under her. Sixteen men were killed or missing, 20 were wounded, but Rodman's engineering plant remained intact. Emmons commenced circling Rodman to provide antiaircraft fire as other suicide minded pilots closed in. Six were splashed. Marine Corps Corsairs arrived, joined in, and scored on 20, but not before others got through. Rodman was hit twice more during the 31/2-hour battle. Emmons splashed six more, but was crashed by five and damaged by four near misses. Her hulk was sunk the next day.

From 7 April to 5 May Rodman underwent temporary repairs at Kerama Retto, then started her journey back to the United States. Arriving at Charleston 19 June, her repairs were completed in mid-October, and on the 22d she sailed for Casco Bay for refresher training. For the next 3 years, she operated along the U.S. east coast, ranging from Newfoundland to the Caribbean then, in September 1949, deployed to the Mediterranean.

There for only 2 weeks, she resumed her western Atlantic operations and during the next 6 years sailed twice more to the Mediterranean, both times for 5-month tours with the 6th Fleet, 2 June to 1 October 1952 and 19 January to 17 May 1954. Reclassified DD-456 on 15 January 1955, she decommissioned 28 July 1955 and was transferred the same day to the Republic of China to serve as RCS Hsien Yang (DD-16).


DD-456 Rodman

Rodman (DD-456) was laid down 16 December 1940 by the Federal Shipbuilding & Dry Dock Co., Kearny, N. J. launched 26 September 1941 sponsored by Mrs. Albert K. Stebbins, Jr., grandniece of Admiral Rodman, and commissioned 27 January 1942, Comdr. W. G. Michelet in command.

Following shakedown, Rodman, assigned to TF 22, alternated training and patrol duties at Argentia with screening and plane guard services for Ranger (CV 4) as that carrier trained aviation personnel along the northeast U.S. coast and ferried planes of the Army's 33d Pursuit Squadron to Accra on the Gold Coast from 22 April to 28 May 1942. Detached in June, she departed Newport 1 July, escorted a seven-troopship convoy to the Firth of Clyde, then continued on to the Orkneys where as a unit of TF 99, she commenced operations with the British Home Fleet. Based at Scapa Flow into August, she alternated patrols from Scotland and Iceland to protect the southern legs of the PQ QP convoy lanes between those two countries and the north Russian ports of Murmansk and Archangel. With the long summer days, however, the U-boats and Norwegian based Luftwaffe units continued to exact a heavy toll. In early July, they destroyed Convoy PQ 17. Further convoys were postponed until the relative cover of the Arctic winter darkness could be regained.

Operation "Easy Unit" then came into being. Toward the end of July, Rodman was designated to assist in filling the increasing immediate logistics demands of the Russians, and of British and American personnel in northern Russia, and to prepare for bases, men, and equipment to provide air cover for the convoys when they resumed. On 17 August Rodman, with Tuscaloosa (CA-37) and two other American destroyers departed Scapa Flow carrying medical personnel and supplies men, and equipment for the RAF's number 144 and 145 Hampden Squadrons, ammunition, pyrotechnics, radar gear drystores, and provisions. Following the route taken by British destroyers 3 weeks earlier, they entered Kola Inlet after dark on the 23d. The luftwaffe was grounded. The ships off loaded, refueled, took on merchant sailors survivors of ill-fated convoys, and departed Vaenga Bay on the 24th.

En route back to Scotland, the American ships were joined by Royal Navy destroyers. On the 25th, the British ships tracked the German minelayer Ulm, one of many ships and boats engaged in planting mines at the entrance to the White Sea and in the shallow waters off Novaya Zemlya, and sank her southeast of Bear Island.

Rodman arrived back in the Firth of Clyde on the 30th and on 1 September got underway for New York. An abbreviated overhaul at Boston followed and, at the end of the month, she resumed training and patrols off the U.S. northeast coast. On 25 October she sortied with TG 34.2 to support the amphibious force of TF 34 in Operation "Torch," the invasion of North Africa. On 7 November, TU 34.2.3., Santee (CVE-29) Emmons (DD-457), and Rodman left TG 34.2 and screened the Southern Attack Group to its destination. From then through the 11th, Rodman screened Santee, then put into Safi for replenishment. On the 13th she retired, arrived at Norfolk on the 24th, thence proceeded to Boston where her 1.1-inch battery was replaced by 40mm. and 20mm. guns.

In December she steamed to the Panama Canal whence she escorted a convoy back to the U.S. east coast, arriving at Norfolk 7 January 1943. The next day she sailed again joining Ranger for two more ferry runs to Africa, this time to Morocco. During March and April, she remained in the western Atlantic, again ranging as far north as Argentia on patrol and escort duty. In May, she returned to the United Kingdom.

Arriving at Scapa Flow on the 18th, Rodman rejoined the Home Fleet. Into the summer she and her sister ships patrolled out of Scotland and Iceland and screened the larger ships of the combined force, including Duke of York, South Dakota, and Alabama, as they attempted to draw the German fleet particularly Tirpitz, out of the protected fjords.

With August, Rodman returned to the United States and by 1 September had resumed patrols at Argentia. Detached in October, she departed Norfolk 3 November for Bermuda whence she sailed in the advance scouting line screening lowa (BB-61) then carrying President Roosevelt on the first leg of his journey to the Teheran Conference. Returning in mid-December, the destroyer guarded carriers on training exercises out of Newport and Portland, Maine, until April 1944. Then, on the 20th, she headed east with other units of her squadron, DesRon 10. On 1 May she arrived at Mers-elKebir, whence she operated as a unit of TG 80.6, a hunterkiller group formed to work with the North African coastal air squadrons against the U-boat menace to shipping in the 325-mile stretch between the Straits of Gibraltar and Oran. The Anglo-American air-sea effort, devised to keep U-boats submerged to the point of exhaustion and then overwhelm them as they surfaced, required time and patience, as well as coordination. It was instrumental in slicing the number of operational U-boats in the Mediterranean by over one-third between March and June.

On 14 May Rodman, with others of her squadron, departed Mers-el-Kebir to track a submarine which had sunk four merchantmen in less than 2 days. A 72 hour air-surface hunt ensued, but on the morning of the 17th, the damaged U - 616 surfaced, was abandoned, and sank. The force picked up survivors and retired to Mers-el-Kebir only to sail for England the following day.

On 22 May Rodman arrived at Plymouth and on the 23d assumed duties as CTU 126.2.1 for Operation "Neptune," the naval phase of "Overlord" the invasion of France. On the 24th, she conducted shore bombardment exercises. Then she waited. On the 4th the convoy "B-1", formed, headed out across the Channel, and then turned back. On the 5th the convoy again formed and headed east, this time continuing on to France and landing reinforcements on Omaha Beach on the afternoon of the 6th. Rodman, detached on arrival in the assault area, joined TG 122.4 and through the 16th provided gunfire support and patrolled in the Baie de la Seine. Brief respite at Plymouth followed, but on the 18th she returned to the Normandy coast. Back in English waters from the 21st through the 24th, she joined TF 129 on the 25th as that force joined the IX Army Air Force in supporting the 9th, 79th, and 4th Army Divisions closing on Cherbourg.

Rodman returned to England the same day, preceded to sea again on the 30th and, after a 3-day stop at Belfast, got underway for the Mediterranean to participate in operation "Dragoon" ("Anvil"), the invasion of southern France Arriving at Mers-el-Kebir 11 July, she was en route to Sicily on the 16th, and into August operated between that island, the coast of Italy, and Malta.

On 11 August, assigned to TU 85.12.4, Rodman sailed from Taranto. Two days later French warships joined the formation and on the 15th, the force arrived off the Delta assault area in the Baie de Bougnon. From 0430 to 0641, Rodman covered the minecraft sweeping the channels to the beaches. Two hours of shore bombardment followed. She then shifted to call fire support duties, which, with antiaircraft screening duties, she continued until retiring to Palermo on the 17th. Back off southern France on the 22d, she fired on shore batteries at Toulon on the 23d, covered minesweepers in the Golfe de Fos on the 25th, and in the Baie de Marseilles on the 26th. Engaged in screening and patrol duties through the end of the month, she sailed for Oran 2 September and for the next month and a half escorted men and supplies into the assault area.

In late October, Destroyer Squadron 10 escorted a convoy back to the United States. From New York Rodman continued on to Boston for conversion to a destroyer minesweeper. Emerging from the yard as DMS-21 on 16 December, she sailed for Norfolk the following week and on 1 January 1945 got underway for the Pacific. During the remainder of that month and into February, she conducted minesweeping and gunnery exercises off California and in Hawaiian waters, then sailed west. On 12 March she anchored at Ulithi and 7 days later sailed for the Ryukyus and her last amphibious Operation, "Iceberg." On the 24th and 25th she participated in minesweeping operations off Kerama Retto, then prepared for the assault on Okinawa.

After the 1 April landings on the Hagushi beaches, she remained in the area and was caught in the air-surface action which enveloped the island on the 6th. Assigned to picket duty early that day, she later shifted to screening duties and joined Emmons (DMS-22) in covering small minecraft sweeping the channel between Iheya Retto and Okinawa. In midafternoon a large flight of kamikazes flew over. At 1532 their leader dived out of the clouds and crashed Rodman's port bow. His bomb exploded under her. Sixteen men were killed or missing, 20 were wounded, but Rodman's engineering plant remained intact. Emmons commenced circling Rodman to provide antiaircraft fire as other suicide minded pilots closed in. Six were splashed. Marine Corps Corsairs arrived, joined in, and scored on 20, but not before others got through. Rodman was hit twice more during the 31/2-hour battle. Emmons splashed six more, but was crashed by five and damaged by four near misses. Her hulk was sunk the next day.

From 7 April to 5 May Rodman underwent temporary repairs at Kerama Retto, then started her journey back to the United States. Arriving at Charleston 19 June, her repairs were completed in mid-October, and on the 22d she sailed for Casco Bay for refresher training. For the next 3 years, she operated along the U.S. east coast, ranging from Newfoundland to the Caribbean then, in September 1949, deployed to the Mediterranean.

There for only 2 weeks, she resumed her western Atlantic operations and during the next 6 years sailed twice more to the Mediterranean, both times for 5-month tours with the 6th Fleet, 2 June to 1 October 1952 and 19 January to 17 May 1954. Reclassified DD-456 on 15 January 1955, she decommissioned 28 July 1955 and was transferred the same day to the Republic of China to serve as RCS Hsien Yang (DD-16).


Attached to Destroyer Division 19 with Hambleton and Federal-built sister Ellyson plus Emmons and Macomb from Bath Iron Works, Rodman operated mainly in the Atlantic and later in the Mediterranean Sea over the next two years, often in company with Emmons. During the Normandy landings, 6 June 1944 Rodman provided gunfire support off Utah Beach then participated in the bombardment of Cherbourg before returning with the squadron to the Mediterranean for the invasion of southern France.

Converted at Boston Navy Yard as fast minesweeper DMS 21 in November&ndashDecember 1944, Rodman went with her squadron to the Pacific as Mine Squadron 20 in time for the invasion of Okinawa. There, northeast of Ie Shima in 6 April 1945, she sustained three kamikaze hits. Emmons, circling to defend her, sustained five hits plus four near misses, was abandoned and later scuttled by gunfire from Ellyson.

Rodman received the Navy Unit Commendation for her action at Okinawa. She also earned five service stars during World War II:

Rodman was made seaworthy at Kerama Retto by 5 May and then sailed for Charleston Navy Yard, arriving 19 June. Permanent repairs were completed by mid-October. Then, like her minesweep sisters, Rodman remained in commission after the war with Mine Division 4. For the next 8 years, she operated primary along the US Atlantic seaboard, with three tours with the Sixth Fleet in the Mediterranean.

On 15 January 1955, Rodman was reclassified DD 456. Decommissioned 28 July, she was transferred to the Republic of China where she served as RCS Hsien Yang (DD-16) until 1976, when she was sunk during the making of a motion picture.


Hi-Tech Survey of USS Emmons Wreck – Ship Fought at Omaha Beach and Okinawa

A recent paper, “Assessment and Significance of a World War II battle site: recording the USS Emmons using a High‐Resolution DEM combining Multibeam Bathymetry and SfM Photogrammetry”, published in the Wiley Online Library, has raised some interesting questions regarding the survey and maintenance of our heritage in terms of archaeological remains that are located under the sea.

The USS Emmons was a US Navy Livermore-class destroyer, and minesweeper. Along with the USS Rodman, the two ships set course for Okinawa in WWII. The action report from the Emmons states that it was on radar duty off the north-west coast of Okinawa, tasked with locating and identifying all aircraft near the island.

USS Emmons (DD-457) at anchor c1942.

On 6th April 1945, the two vessels were subject to a kamikaze attack by the Japanese Airforce. In the mid-afternoon, the Rodman was hit by one plane, and the Emmons immediately began to circle the Rodman to provide what protection it could. The Emmons shot down six planes, but was then attacked by five aircraft simultaneously all five planes hit their target, disabling the ship.

The U.S. Navy destroyer USS Emmons (DD-457) off the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Virginia (USA), on 1 November 1943.

By early evening, it was apparent that the Emmons was no longer operable and the wounded were transferred to another vessel. Later on, there was a massive explosion, and the Emmons was abandoned. Next morning it was deliberately sunk to avoid it being captured by the Japanese.

Nothing further was heard of the wreck until August 2000 when fishermen reported the presence of an oil slick on the sea just north of the Motobu Peninsula. Investigations found the wreckage of a ship, but it was not until 2001 that divers reported that wreck to be the USS Emmons.

USS Rodman (DD-456), off Boston, 2 April 1943.

A team of Japanese scientists comprising Hironobu Kan, Chiaki Katagiri, Yumiko Nakanishi, Shin Yoshizaki, Masayuki Nagao, and Rintaro Ono, investigated the wreck of the USS Emmons which was lying in 40 meters of water off Okinawa Island.

The team writes that there are many accounts of WWII from eye-witnesses, but even after 70 years, there is still little material evidence of what happened and even less understanding of how to preserve naval relics for posterity. Pearl Harbor is one of the very few sites that has been extensively surveyed and subject to archaeological investigation.

The USS Arizona (BB-39) burning after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor

The UNESCO Convention on the Protection of the Underwater Cultural Heritage (2001) will cover WWII Naval Wrecks from 2039, but at this time there is no policy in place on how to survey, investigate, preserve, and protect these cultural sites.

The study undertaken by the Japanese team aimed to devise a methodology for the precise geographic information that can be used for the preservation, research, and future use of the historically important naval battles that took place off Okinawa Island during WWII.

The team realized that it is simple to build a relief map of WWII battle locations on land and it is easy to survey the area and aerial photography provides most of the data required. However, underwater there is no simple process. The team started by surveying the sea floor using a multi-beam echo sounder. This produced a topographical map of the oceanographic, geomorphological, and sedimentological conditions around the wreck.

The battleship USS Idaho shelling Okinawa on April 1, 1945

Once the team understood the make-up of the sea floor and the ocean conditions around the wreck, they turned their attention to creating a detailed image of the wreck in its current location. They employed their own methodology that used structure-from-motion photo-grammetry and multi-beam bathymetry.

Using sophisticated echo sounders as well as highly technical and advanced software that is able to infer a three-dimensional object from a two-dimensional image, they managed to produce very detailed and sophisticated data about the wreck and its surroundings. The research data gives an extremely accurate picture of the current state of the wreck. The high-resolution plan of the wreck site provides a great baseline for future investigation and study.

The Emmons lies in a roughly north-south orientation, in around 40 meters of water, on a coral reef. The damage caused by the attack is clearly visible, as is the topography of the ocean floor around the wreck. The data collected shows that, since it sank, the wreck has not moved, even though there are strong currents in the area.

Scuba diver Exploring over a shipwreck.

One of the issues that needs to be resolved is what to do with unexploded ordnance that is still found on underwater sites. The work undertaken on the Emmons, including the high resolution of the imagery and photographs, shows there are four Mark IX depth charges still in their cradles.

The Japanese Coast Guard has placed warning buoys over the site to warn shipping of the potential danger. Exploding the depth charges in place will destroy the wreck, so the dilemma of what to do in these circumstances needs multi-national discussion to ensure that wrecks are made safe but also preserved.

Many wrecks are impossible to reach for most people, but there are members of the crew that are still living as well as families of those that lost their lives, who may wish to ‘visit’ the site. The creation of such detailed images of the site would allow the authorities to build a land-based memorial close to the location of the wreck. This memorial would be a place to remember as well as to educate people on the naval battles that took place.

“The Battle for Fox Green Beach” Watercolor by Navy Combat Artist Dwight Shepler, 1944, showing USS Emmons (DD-457) bombarding in support of the Omaha Beach landings, on D-Day of the Normandy invasion, 6 June 1944.

It is crucial that mankind does not forget the brave men who lost their lives on the sea the creation of such memorials would go a long way to ensuring that this does not happen.


USS Rodman DD-456 (DMS-21)

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Post war [ edit | edit source ]

[2][3]USS Rodman (DMS-21) underway, in 1954.For the next three years, she operated along the U.S. east coast, ranging from Newfoundland to the Caribbean then, in September 1949, deployed to the Mediterranean.

There for only two weeks, she resumed her western Atlantic operations and during the next six years sailed twice more to the Mediterranean, both times for 5-month tours with the 6th Fleet, 2 June to 1 October 1952 and 19 January to 17 May 1954. Reclassified DD-456 on 15 January 1955, she decommissioned 28 July 1955 and was transferred the same day to the Republic of China to serve as RCS Hsien Yang (DD-16). After she ran aground c. 1969, her name and pennant number were reassigned to the former USS Macomb (DD-458), which was acquired in 1970. [1]

Rodman earned five battle stars during World War II.


Contents

Following shakedown, Rodman, assigned to Task Force 22 (TF㺖), alternated training and patrol duties at NS Argentia, Newfoundland with screening and plane guard services for Ranger (CV-4) as that aircraft carrier trained aviation personnel along the northeast U.S. coast and ferried planes of the Army's 33rd Pursuit Squadron to Accra on the Gold Coast from 22 April to 28 May 1942. Detached in June, she departed Newport 1 July, escorted a seven-troopship convoy to the Firth of Clyde, then continued on to Orkney where, as a unit of TF㻣, she commenced operations with the British Home Fleet. Based at Scapa Flow into August, she alternated patrols from Scotland and Iceland to protect the southern legs of the PQ/QP convoy lanes between those two countries and the north Russian ports of Murmansk and Archangel. With the long summer days, however, the U-boats and Norwegian based Luftwaffe units continued to exact a heavy toll. In early July, they destroyed Convoy PQ-17. Further convoys were postponed until the relative cover of the Arctic winter darkness could be regained.

Operation "Easy Unit" then came into being. Toward the end of July, Rodman was designated to assist in filling the increasing immediate logistics demands of the Russians, and of British and American personnel in northern Russia, and to prepare for bases, men, and equipment to provide air cover for the convoys when they resumed. On 17 August Rodman, with Tuscaloosa (CA-37) and two other American destroyers departed Scapa Flow carrying medical personnel and supplies men, and equipment for the RAF's number 144 and 145 Hampden Squadrons, ammunition, pyrotechnics, radar gear drystores, and provisions. Following the route taken by British destroyers three weeks earlier, they entered Kola Inlet after dark on the 23d. The Luftwaffe was grounded. The ships offloaded, refueled, took on merchant sailors survivors of ill-fated convoys, and departed Vaenga Bay on the 24th.

En route back to Scotland, the American ships were joined by Royal Navy destroyers. On the 25th, the British ships tracked the German minelayer Ulm — one of many ships and boats engaged in planting mines at the entrance to the White Sea and in the shallow waters off Novaya Zemlya — and sank her southeast of Bear Island (Norway).

Rodman arrived back in the Firth of Clyde on the 30th and on 1 September got underway for New York. An abbreviated overhaul at Boston followed and, at the end of the month, she resumed training and patrols off the U.S. northeast coast. On 25 October she sortied with Task Group 34.2 (TG㺢.2) to support the amphibious force of TF㺢 in Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa. On 7 November, Task Unit 34.2.3 (TU㺢.2.3), Santee (CVE-29), Emmons (DD-457), and Rodman left TG㺢.2 and screened the Southern Attack Group to its destination. From then through the 11th, Rodman screened Santee, then put into Safi for replenishment. On the 13th she retired, arrived at Norfolk on the 24th, thence proceeded to Boston where her 1.1 inch (28 mm) battery was replaced by 40 mm and 20 mm guns.

In December she steamed to the Panama Canal whence she escorted a convoy back to the U.S. east coast, arriving at Norfolk on 7 January 1943. The next day she sailed again joining Ranger for two more ferry runs to Africa, this time to Morocco. During March and April, she remained in the western Atlantic, again ranging as far north as Argentia on patrol and escort duty. In May, she returned to the United Kingdom.

Arriving at Scapa Flow on the 18th, Rodman rejoined the Home Fleet. Into the summer she and her sister ships patrolled out of Scotland and Iceland and screened the larger ships of the combined force, including HMS Duke of York, USS South Dakota (BB-57), and USS Alabama (BB-60), as they attempted to draw the German fleet — particularly the battleship Tirpitz — out of the protected fjords.

With August, Rodman returned to the United States and by 1 September had resumed patrols at Argentia. Detached in October, she departed Norfolk 3 November for Bermuda whence she sailed in the advance scouting line screening Iowa (BB-61) then carrying President Franklin D. Roosevelt on the first leg of his journey to the Teheran Conference.

Returning in mid-December, the destroyer guarded carriers on training exercises out of Newport and Portland, Maine, until April 1944. Then, on the 20th, she headed east with other units of her squadron, DesRon 10. On 1 May she arrived at Mers-el-Kebir, whence she operated as a unit of TG㻐.6, a hunter-killer group formed to work with the North African coastal air squadrons against the U-boat menace to shipping in the 325-mile stretch between the Straits of Gibraltar and Oran. The Anglo-American air-sea effort, devised to keep U-boats submerged to the point of exhaustion and then overwhelm them as they surfaced, required time and patience, as well as coordination. It was instrumental in slicing the number of operational U-boats in the Mediterranean by over one-third between March and June.

On 14 May Rodman, with others of her squadron, departed Mers-el-Kebir to track a submarine which had sunk four merchantmen in less than two days. A 72-hour air-surface hunt ensued, but on the morning of the 17th, the damaged U-616 surfaced, was abandoned, and sank. The force picked up survivors and retired to Mers-el-Kebir only to sail for England the following day.

On 22 May Rodman arrived at Plymouth and on the 23d assumed duties as CTU𧅾.2.1 for Operation Neptune, the naval phase of Operation Overlord the invasion of France. On the 24th, she conducted shore bombardment exercises. Then she waited. On the 4th the convoy "B-1", formed, headed out across the English Channel, but then turned back, as the invasion was postponed one day. On the 5th the convoy again formed and headed east, this time continuing on to France and landing reinforcements on Omaha Beach on the afternoon of the 6th. Rodman, detached on arrival in the assault area, joined TG𧅺.4 and through the 16th provided gunfire support and patrolled in the Baie de la Seine. Brief respite at Plymouth followed, but on the 18th she returned to the Normandy coast. Back in English waters from the 21st through the 24th, she joined TF𧆁 on the 25th as that force joined the U.S. IX Army Air Force in supporting the U.S. VII Corps (the 9th, 79th, and 4th Divisions) closing on Cherbourg.

Rodman returned to England the same day, preceded to sea again on the 30th and, after a 3-day stop at Belfast, got underway for the Mediterranean to participate in Operation Dragoon ("Anvil"), the invasion of southern France. Arriving at Mers-el-Kebir 11 July, she was en route to Sicily on the 16th, and into August operated between that island, the coast of Italy, and Malta.

On 11 August, assigned to TU 85.12.4, Rodman sailed from Taranto. Two days later French warships joined the formation and on the 15th, the force arrived off the Delta assault area in the Baie de Bougnon. From 04:30 to 06:41, Rodman covered the minecraft sweeping the channels to the beaches. Two hours of shore bombardment followed. She then shifted to call fire support duties, which, with antiaircraft screening duties, she continued until retiring to Palermo on the 17th. Back off southern France on the 22nd, she fired on shore batteries at Toulon on the 23nd, covered minesweepers in the Golfe de Fos on the 25th, and in the Baie de Marseilles on the 26th. Engaged in screening and patrol duties through the end of the month, she sailed for Oran 2 September and for the next month and a half escorted men and supplies into the assault area.

In late October, Destroyer Squadron 10 escorted a convoy back to the United States. From New York Rodman continued on to Boston for conversion to a destroyer minesweeper. Emerging from the yard as DMS-21 on 16 December, she sailed for Norfolk the following week.

On 1 January 1945, Rodman got underway for the Pacific. During the remainder of that month and into February, she conducted minesweeping and gunnery exercises off California and in Hawaiian waters, then sailed west. On 12 March she anchored at Ulithi and seven days later sailed for the Ryukyus and her last amphibious operation, "Iceberg". On the 24th and 25th she participated in minesweeping operations off Kerama Retto, then prepared for the assault on Okinawa.

After 1 April landings on the Hagushi beaches, she remained in the area and was caught in the air-surface action which enveloped the island on the 6th. Assigned to picket duty early that day, she later shifted to screening duties and joined Emmons (DMS-22) in covering small minecraft sweeping the channel between Iheya Retto and Okinawa. In midafternoon a large flight of kamikazes flew over. At 15:32 their leader dived out of the clouds and crashed Rodman's port bow. His bomb exploded under her. Sixteen men were killed or missing, 20 were wounded, but Rodman's engineering plant remained intact. Emmons commenced circling Rodman to provide antiaircraft fire as other suicide minded pilots closed in. Six were splashed. Marine Corps F4U Corsairs arrived, joined in, and scored on 20, but not before others got through. Rodman was hit twice more during the 3½-hour battle. Emmons splashed six more, but was crashed by five and damaged by four near misses. Her hulk was sunk the next day.

From 7 April to 5 May Rodman underwent temporary repairs at Kerama Retto, then started her journey back to the United States. Arriving at Charleston Navy Yard on 19 June, her repairs were completed in mid-October, and on the 22nd she sailed for Casco Bay for refresher training.


Kamikaze Images

On April 6, 1945, five kamikaze aircraft hit the high-speed minesweeper USS Emmons (DMS-22) in quick succession. The surviving crewmen soon abandoned the seriously damaged ship, and Emmons was intentionally sunk by another high-speed minesweeper in the early morning hours of April 7, 1945, since the ship had uncontrolled fires and was drifting toward enemy-held territory. Edward Baxter Billingsley, author of The Emmons Saga, served as the ship's third commanding officer from July 1943 to November 1944 and previously had served as Engineering Officer and Executive Officer since the commissioning of the destroyer in December 1941 (designated DD-457 at that time), two days prior to Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor. This book presents an extremely well-researched history of Emmons' entire career. However, other than some individual accounts of the kamikaze attack and its aftermath, the narrative generally lacks personal stories to make the crew come alive.

Billingsley spent eight years performing research for this thorough history. The primary sources included ship's logs, war diaries, and action reports. He also utilized recordings of survivors' memories taped at the October 1982 reunion of the Emmons Association and written accounts of the kamikaze attack prepared by surviving crewmen within four days after the sinking. The book includes 25 pages of personal accounts of the kamikaze attack from these reports, but they lose some of their impact as Billingsley has converted them from first to third person accounts. The Emmons Association privately published Billingsley's history in 1989. This subsequent edition published in 2005 includes two short additional chapters, one about the 2001 discovery of the Emmons wreck by divers and another about the special bond of Emmons' survivors and their reunion meetings.

The Emmons Saga chronologically covers the complete history of the destroyer (converted to a high-speed minesweeper in November and December 1944) from her commissioning to her sinking. The book lacks an index to quickly locate specific references and maps to follow the ship's numerous movements to relatively obscure places in both the Atlantic and Pacific. A 12-page Employment Schedule at the back of the book summarizes Emmons' actions during the war. The book has 25 photos that effectively supplement the narrative, but most are not that clear. The cover has a fine painting by Dwight Shepler, Navy Combat Artist aboard Emmons during the Allied landings on the beaches of Normandy. The painting on the cover is entitled "Target of Opportunity," which shows Emmons firing her guns at German gun emplacements on top of rugged cliffs to the east of Omaha beach.

After Emmons' commissioning and fitting out, the destroyer's shakedown cruise took her to South America for diplomatic reasons. Afterward, while Emmons served in the Atlantic and European theaters, she suffered no casualties and participated directly in few battles, which makes the first 13 chapters somewhat slow reading in places with many pages describing rather uninteresting patrol and escort missions. The tension increases with Emmons' participation in the Normandy landings in June 1944 and the invasion of southern France in August 1944, but even these events rarely put the ship in real danger. In late 1944, Emmons was one of 24 destroyers no longer needed in the Atlantic that the Navy decided to convert to high-speed minesweepers for use in the Pacific War. The conversion took six weeks. The new ship, designated DMS-22, still had the primary characteristics of a destroyer but with fewer guns and depth charges, and minesweeping equipment had been added to the stern.

After minesweeping training, Emmons went by way of Ulithi to the waters around Okinawa in preparation for the planned invasion on April 1, 1945. Early in the morning of March 24, Emmons and other destroyer minesweepers began sweeping assigned areas south and southwest of Okinawa. On April 6, the day of Japan's first and largest of ten mass kamikaze attacks called Kikusui (Floating Chrysanthemum), Emmons and her sister ship Rodman were assigned northwest of Okinawa to provide gunfire support for AM class minesweeper units. At 1532, three kamikaze planes attacked Rodman, with one crashing into the forecastle starting huge fires and another one hitting close aboard to starboard with a bomb rupturing the hull and causing flooding in several compartments. Emmons started to circle Rodman to provide fire support to the seriously damaged ship with an estimated 50 to 75 enemy aircraft heading their way. Combat Air Patrol (CAP) destroyed many Japanese planes, and Emmons shot down six. Another four planes crashed close aboard without causing serious damage. Finally, a kamikaze succeeded in crashing into Emmons at 1732, and four more kamikaze aircraft hit the ship within two minutes killing 60 and wounding 77 [1]. At about the same time, another suicide aircraft hit the damaged Rodman, which suffered casualties of 16 dead and 20 wounded [2] from a total of three kamikaze aircraft hits. About 1800, the decision was made aboard Emmons to abandon ship, and the drifting ship with uncontrolled files was sunk by gunfire from the high-speed minesweeper Ellyson (DMS-19) in the early morning of April 7, 1945.

Several officers and crewmen from Emmons received individual recognition for outstanding performance of duty on April 6, 1945, with awards of one Navy Cross, four Silver Stars, and eight Bronze Stars. All personnel serving on Emmons at the time of the sinking received a Navy Unit Commendation Ribbon from the Secretary of the Navy. The commendation reads as follows:

For outstanding heroism in action while attached to Mine Squadron TWENTY, operating under Commander Mine Force, Pacific Fleet, from March 24 to 31 and thereafter under the operational control of Commander Transport Screen, from April 1 to 6, 1945, during operations for the seizure of enemy-held Okinawa, Ryukyu Islands. Although lightly armed and highly vulnerable while operating in dangerous mined waters, the U.S.S. EMMONS rendered heroic service in minesweeping, fire support, radar picket, anti-suicide boat, antisubmarine and antiaircraft screen missions. A natural and frequent target for heavy Japanese aerial attack, she was constantly vigilant and ready for battle, fighting her guns valiantly against a group of Japanese suicide planes striking in force on April 6, and downing six of the attackers before five others crashed her in rapid succession, killing or wounding many personnel and inflicting damage which necessitated her sinking. By her own aggressiveness and the courage and skill of her officers and men, the U.S.S. EMMONS achieved a record of gallantry in combat reflecting the highest credit upon herself and the United States Naval Service.

Personnel who served on Emmons' sister ship Rodman (DD-456/DMS-21), which underwent temporary repairs at Kerama Rettō and then returned to the States, also received a Navy Unit Commendation for outstanding heroism during the Battle of Okinawa.


USS Emmons DD-457
during service in Atlantic

Notes

1. From Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS) entry for Emmons. Surprisingly, Billingsley never summarizes in the book the total number of casualties from the hits by five kamikaze aircraft. A photo of a plaque affixed to the Emmons wreck in 2003 lists 18 killed and 42 missing (p. 385), which agrees with the total of 60 dead in the DANFS entry.

Appendix B lists the names of officers and crew killed, missing in action and wounded in addition to showing the names of survivors. This list has 18 killed and 40 missing, which makes a total of 58 dead, two less than the DANFS entry. Appendix B lists 72 wounded, which also differs from the DANFS entry that indicates 77 wounded.


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Product Description

USS Rodman DD 456 DMS

World War II Cruise Book

Bring the Cruise Book to Life with this Multimedia Presentation

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A great part of Naval history.

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  • 22 Minute Audio " American Radio Mobilizes the Homefront " WWII (National Archives)
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    Watch the video: Dennis Rodman: 1986 - 2006 Highlights