Bellerophon ARL-31 - History

Bellerophon ARL-31 - History


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Bellerophon

Bellerophon was a character in Greek mythology.

(ARL-31: dp. 2125; 1. 328'; b. 50'; dr. 14'; a. 11.6 k.;
cpl. 253; a. 13"; cl. Achelaus)

LST-1132 was reclassified ARI-31, 14 August 1944, but
launched 7 March 1945 by Chicago Bridge and Iron Co.,
Seneca, Ill., as LST-1132; sponsored by Mrs. Hazel Simcox
Witherspoon; and commissioned 19 March 1945, Lieuten
ant P. P. Wynn in command. She departed 21 March
1945 for Alabama Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co.,
Mobile, Ala., where on 31 March 1945 she was placed out of commission for conversion to' a landing craft repair ship. Conversion was completed 21 July 1945 and she was placed in commission as Bellerophon (ARL-31).

The ship's first and only assignment was as a repair ship for boat pools in the San Francisco Day area. She remained on this duty until 26 November 1947 when she commenced her pre-inactivation overhaul. Bellerophon was placed out of commission in reserve at San Diego 26 March 1948.


Bellerophon

Bellerophon ( / b ə ˈ l ɛr ə f ən / Greek: Βελλεροφῶν ) or Bellerophontes ( Βελλεροφόντης ) is a hero of Greek mythology. He was "the greatest hero and slayer of monsters, alongside Cadmus and Perseus, before the days of Heracles", [1] and his greatest feat was killing the Chimera, a monster that Homer depicted with a lion's head, a goat's body, and a serpent's tail: "her breath came out in terrible blasts of burning flame." [2] Bellerophon was born at Corinth and was the son of the mortal Eurynome by either her husband Glaucus, or Poseidon.


Order of Succession [ ]

Fereldan inheritance of noble titles is determined by a combination of elective and hereditary order of succession. Any legitimate offspring of the reigning noble is able to succeed the title as heir regardless of gender or birth order. Β] In the absence of the reigning noble and should the heir apparent be too young to assume their duties, the spouse of the reigning noble can assume the role of regent until the heir apparent comes of age. Γ] Alternatively, should the heir apparent be orphaned and/or cannot assume their duties, the heir apparent can appoint a regent to rule in their stead. The Fereldan monarch can also appoint a Chancellor of Ferelden which acts as a regent and chief advisor for the royal monarch but appear to be below the monarch's spouse if the monarch is married. Δ]

Should the reigning noble lack lineal descendants to be an heir or the heir abdicates, the title would go to any of the noble's elected siblings Ε] or collateral descendants Ζ] until the bloodline is spent.

Should no descendant of the noble family survive, the spouse of the penultimate reigning noble can make a claim of inheritance through marriage. Η] An in-law can also make the same claim. ⎖] In the event that no legitimate descendants are available, bastards from the penultimate noble's lineage can make a claim of inheritance and some say they have a stronger claim than in-laws or widows/widowers who aren't related to the noble by blood. ⎗]

By Fereldan custom, vacant lands become the property of whomever claims them through skill of arms a tournament is usually held with the victor taking the vacant title as their prize. ⎘]

Alternatively, the Fereldan monarch can appoint new families to rule vacant titles but some of the conservative nobles would view these new nobility as interlopers despite the legitimacy of their elevation. ⎙]


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One possible etymology that has been suggested is: Βελλεροφόντης from βέλεμνον, βελόνη, βέλος ("projectile, dart, javelin, needle, arrow, bullet") and -φόντης ("slayer") from φονεύω ("to slay"). However, Geoffrey Kirk says that "Βελλεροφόντης means 'slayer of Belleros'". [3] Belleros could have been a Lycian, a local daimon or a Corinthian nobleman—Bellerophon's name "clearly invited all sorts of speculation". [3]

The Iliad vi.155–203 contains an embedded narrative told by Bellerophon's grandson Glaucus, named for his great-grandfather, which recounts Bellerophon's myth. Bellerophon's father was Glaucus, [4] who was the king of Corinth and the son of Sisyphus. Bellerophon's grandsons Sarpedon and the younger Glaucus fought in the Trojan War. In the Epitome of pseudo-Apollodorus, a genealogy is given for Chrysaor ("of the golden sword") that would make him a double of Bellerophon he too is called the son of Glaucus the son of Sisyphus. Chrysaor has no myth save that of his birth: from the severed neck of Medusa, who was with child by Poseidon, he and Pegasus both sprang at the moment of her death. "From this moment we hear no more of Chrysaor, the rest of the tale concerning the stallion only. [who visits the spring of Pirene] perhaps also for his brother's sake, by whom in the end he let himself be caught, the immortal horse by his mortal brother." [5]

Bellerophon's brave journey began in the familiar way, [6] with an exile: he had murdered either his brother, whose name is usually given as Deliades, or killed a shadowy "enemy", a "Belleros" [7] (though the details are never directly told), and in expiation of his crime arrived as a suppliant to Proetus, king in Tiryns, one of the Mycenaean strongholds of the Argolid. Proetus, by virtue of his kingship, cleansed Bellerophon of his crime. The wife of the king, whether named Anteia [8] or Stheneboea, [9] took a fancy to him, but when he rejected her, she accused Bellerophon of attempting to ravish her. [10] Proetus dared not satisfy his anger by killing a guest, so he sent Bellerophon to King Iobates his father-in-law, in the plain of the River Xanthus in Lycia, bearing a sealed message in a folded tablet: "Pray remove the bearer from this world: he attempted to violate my wife, your daughter." [11] Before opening the tablets, Iobates feasted with Bellerophon for nine days. On reading the tablet's message Iobates too feared the wrath of the Erinyes if he murdered a guest so he sent Bellerophon on a mission that he deemed impossible: to kill the Chimera, living in neighboring Caria. The Chimera was a fire-breathing monster whose make-up comprised the body of a goat, the head of a lion and the tail being a serpent. This monster had terrorized the nearby countryside.

Capturing Pegasus

The Lycian seer Polyeidos told Bellerophon that he would have need of Pegasus. To obtain the services of the untamed winged horse, Polyeidos told Bellerophon to sleep in the temple of Athena. While Bellerophon slept, he dreamed that Athena set a golden bridle beside him, saying "Sleepest thou, prince of the house of Aiolos? Come, take this charm for the steed and show it to the Tamer thy father as thou makest sacrifice to him of a white bull." [12] It was there when he awoke. Bellerophon had to approach Pegasus while it drank from a well Polyeidos told him which well—the never-failing Pirene on the citadel of Corinth, the city of Bellerophon's birth. Other accounts say that Athena brought Pegasus already tamed and bridled, or that Poseidon the horse-tamer, secretly the father of Bellerophon, brought Pegasus, as Pausanias understood. [13] Bellerophon mounted his steed and flew off to where the Chimera was said to dwell.

The slaying of the Chimera

When he arrived in Lycia, the Chimera was truly ferocious, and he could not harm the monster even while riding on Pegasus. He felt the heat of the breath the Chimera expelled, and was struck with an idea. He got a large block of lead and mounted it on his spear. Then he flew head-on towards the Chimera, holding out the spear as far as he could. Before he broke off his attack, he managed to lodge the block of lead inside the Chimera's throat. The beast's fire-breath melted the lead, and blocked its air passage. [14] The Chimera suffocated, and Bellerophon returned victorious to King Iobates. [15] Iobates, on Bellerophon's return, was unwilling to credit his story. A series of daunting further quests ensued: he was sent against the warlike Solymi and then against the Amazons who fought like men, whom Bellerophon vanquished by dropping boulders from his winged horse when he was sent against a Carian pirate, Cheirmarrhus, an ambush failed, when Bellerophon killed all sent to assassinate him the palace guards were sent against him, but Bellerophon called upon Poseidon, who flooded the plain of Xanthus behind Bellerophon as he approached. In defense the palace women sent him and the flood in retreat by rushing from the gates with their robes lifted high, offering themselves, to which the modest hero replied by withdrawing. [16] Iobates relented, produced the letter, and allowed Bellerophon to marry his daughter Philonoe, the younger sister of Anteia, and shared with him half his kingdom, [17] with fine vineyards and grain fields. The lady Philonoe bore him Isander, [18] Hippolochus and Laodamia, who lay with Zeus the Counselor and bore Sarpedon but was slain by Artemis. [19] [20] [21]

Flight to Olympus and fall

As Bellerophon's fame grew, so did his hubris. Bellerophon felt that because of his victory over the Chimera he deserved to fly to Mount Olympus, the realm of the gods. However, this presumption angered Zeus and he sent a gad-fly to sting the horse causing Bellerophon to fall all the way back to Earth. Pegasus completed the flight to Olympus where Zeus used him as a pack horse for his thunderbolts. [22] On the Plain of Aleion ("Wandering"), Bellerophon (who had fallen into a thorn bush) lived out his life in misery as a blinded crippled hermit grieving and shunning the haunts of men until he died. [23] In Tlos, near Fethiye, in modern-day Turkey, ancient Lykia, there is a tomb with a carving of a man riding a winged horse. This is claimed locally to be the tomb of Bellerophon.


Bellerophon ARL-31 - History

USS Bellerophon (ARL-31) was one of 39 Achelous-class landing craft repair ships built for the United States Navy during World War II. Named for Bellerophon (a hero of Greek mythology, the son of Eurymede by either the Corinthian King, Glaucus, or the sea god, Poseidon), she was the only U.S. Naval vessel to bear the name.

At first Sisyphus had tried to arrange a marriage for Glaucus with the shape-shifting Mestra, a daughter of Erysichthon, but despite the payment of valuable bride-gifts, she eluded the marriage and was taken to an island by Poseidon. Glaucus then married a daughter of Nisus named Eurymede or Eurynome. Zeus had declared that Glaucus would sire no children even by his own wife, perhaps because of his violations against Aphrodite. While Eurynome gave birth to the famed hero Bellerophon, Poseidon is usually seen as the true father. The Iliad, however, names Glaucus as Bellerophon's father. The equine theme continues: Poseidon was associated with horses, and Bellerophon was the rider of the winged horse Pegasus.

Meleager was a Calydonian prince as the son of Althaea and the vintner King Oeneus or according to some, of the god Ares. He was the brother of Deianeira, Toxeus, Clymenus, Periphas, Agelaus (or Ageleus), Thyreus (or Phereus or Pheres), Gorge, Eurymede and Melanippe.

In Greek mythology, Eurynome (Ancient Greek: Εὐρυνόμη, from εὐρύς, eurys, "broad" and νομός, nomos, "pasture" or νόμος "law") or Eurymede was a daughter of Nisus, king of Megara, and mother of Bellerophon by Poseidon.

Deianira was the daughter of Althaea and her husband Oeneus (whose name means "wine-man"), the king of Calydon (after the wine-god gave the king the vine to cultivate), and the half-sister of Meleager. Her other siblings were Toxeus, Clymenus, Periphas, Agelaus (or Ageleus), Thyreus (or Phereus or Pheres), Gorge, Eurymede and Melanippe.

Althaea was the daughter of King Thestius and Eurythemis, and was sister to Leda, Hypermnestra, Iphiclus, Euippus. She was also the wife of Oeneus, king of Calydon, and mother of sons, Meleager, Toxeus, Thyreus (Pheres or Phereus), Clymenus, Agelaus (Ageleus), Periphas and daughters, Deianeira, Gorge, Melanippe and Eurymede (the latter two were included in the Meleagrids). According to some writers, Meleager was the result of a liaison with the Greek god Ares, and Deianeira the progeny of Althaea and the god Dionysus. In some accounts, Ancaeus was called her son by the god Poseidon.

When Meleager was born, the Moirai (the Fates) predicted he would only live until a piece of wood, burning in the family hearth, was consumed by fire. Overhearing them, Althaea immediately doused and hid it.

The Meleagrids included Melanippe and Eurymede, possibly also Mothone, Perimede and Polyxo. Two other daughters of Oeneus, Gorge and Deianeira, were not transformed, since the former was married off to Andraemon, and the latter to Heracles.

In Greek mythology, the name Toxeus or Toxius (Ancient Greek: Τοξεύς means "bowman" ) refers to the following individuals:

Eurynomê (Ancient Greek: Εὐρυνόμη, from εὐρύς, eurys, "broad" and νομός, nomos, "pasture" or νόμος "law") is a name that refers to the following characters in Greek mythology:

On 21 March 1945 the ship sailed for Mobile, Alabama where she was placed out of commission on 31 March to be fitted out as a landing craft repair ship by the Alabama Drydock & Shipbuilding Company. The conversion was completed that summer, and USS Bellerophon (ARL-31) was recommissioned on 21 July 1945 at Mobile with Lieutenant Samuel H. Alexander, USNR, in command. On 31 July the ship began a fortnight's shakedown cruise that took her to Galveston, Texas. She returned to Mobile on 14 August and began preparations for an overseas deployment. On 1 September Bellerophon departed Mobile and headed for the Pacific Ocean. After transiting the Panama Canal, she headed up the west coast toward San Francisco. She made a stop at San Diego before arriving at Treasure Island on 3 October. There, the ship began duty as the repair ship for a newly formed boat pool. When a strike by civilian workers paralyzed civilian yards during the latter part of October, Bellerophon began making voyage repairs to Operation Magic Carpet ships while also carrying out some conversion work to enable attack cargo ships to serve as passenger carriers.

In Hades, his is the only shade that does not flee Heracles, who has come after Cerberus. In Bacchylides' Ode V, Meleager is still in his shining armor, so formidable, in Bacchylides' account, that Heracles reaches for his bow to defend himself. Heracles is moved to tears by Meleager's account Meleager has left his sister Deianira unwedded in his father's house, and entreats Heracles to take her as bride here Bacchylides breaks off his account of the meeting, without noting that in this way Heracles in the Underworld chooses a disastrous wife.

Since Oineus had made sacrifices yearly to all the gods during the harvest ceremonies, but had omitted to honor Artemis, in anger she sent a boar of immense size to lay waste the district of Calydon. He sent out his son Meleager who promised that he would go with chosen leaders to attack the Calydonian Boar. So began the Calydonian Hunt during which the boar was killed by Atalanta and Meleager. However, an argument began as to who should take the boar's skin as a prize: Meleager gave it to Atalanta, but two of his maternal uncles, sons of Thestius, wanted the trophy for themselves, claiming that it belonged to them by the right of birth if Meleager did not want it. Meleager, in rage, killed them, which resulted in a war between the Calydonians and the Curetes, in which all of Oeneus' sons, including Meleager, fell.

According to the Hesiodic Catalogue of Women, Athena herself taught the girl handiwork. Sisyphus attempted to drive away her cattle, but ended up winning her as bride for his son Glaucus by the will of Athena. But Zeus had ordained that Sisyphus would not leave behind any progeny, and Eurynome lay instead with Poseidon, giving birth to Bellerophon.

Glaucus succeeded Sisyphus to the throne of Ephyra, the city he had built, which later became Corinth. He was the ancestor of the Glaucus in the Iliad.

In Sophocles' account of Deianira's marriage, she was courted by the river god Achelous but saved from having to marry him by Heracles, who defeated Achelous in a wrestling contest for her hand in marriage.

In Greek and Roman mythology, Glaucus (Ancient Greek: Γλαῦκος Glaukos means "greyish blue" or "bluish green" and "glimmering") was a son of Sisyphus whose main myth involved his violent death as the result of his horsemanship. He was a king of Corinth and the subject of a lost tragedy by Aeschylus, Glaucus Potnieus (Glaucus at Potniae), fragments of which are contained in an Oxyrhynchus Papyrus.

When Althaea learned what had happened, she retrieved the brand from where she had concealed it and placed the brand back upon the fire, killing him. Some say that she and Meleager's wife Cleopatra later hanged themselves, others that she killed herself with a dagger.


Abilities

  • Prowess in Battle: After he had found his self-confidence, Bellerophon proved to be one of the greatest warriors of his time. He slaughtered half of the Solymoi, a tribe of fearless warriors who had never been conquered, and he later killed hundreds of the best Amazon warriors all by himself.
  • Hydrokinesis (possibly): As a son of Poseidon, it is reasonable and logical to deduce that Bellerophon has the ability to control and manipulate water, though it was never revealed or confirmed as to whether he truly possessed this ability just like Percy did.
  • Equine Lordship (possibly): It is possible that, as a son of Poseidon, Bellerophon had the ability to control and communicate with horses, given Pegasus' surprising compliance in letting him put the magical bridle on it, and how he was able to communicate with Pegasus.

Prince Bellerophon in Exile

The earliest, and most complete, story of the hero Bellerophon comes from a source that is usually associated with other heroes of a later age. In Homer’s Iliad, one of the allies of the Trojan army tells an embedded story of his famous grandfather.

Homer’s Glaucus was the grandson of the Corinthian prince Bellerophon, who himself was one of the sons of the infamous King Glaucus. The elder Glaucus, the son of the notorious Sisyphus, had been known for feeding his horses the flesh of men to win chariot races.

Such an ancestry may seem unlikely for a great hero, but writers found a basis for his goodness in his mother. Eurynome was a wise and virtuous woman who had learned weaving from Athena herself.

The lineage of both the terrible line of Sisyphus and the nobility of Eurynome set the stage for a character that would be exceptionally heroic, but also deeply flawed.

Bellerophon’s story began with exile. According to some sources he had murdered a stranger, while others said that he had accidentally killed his own brother.

Greek law made little distinction between intentional murder and accidentally causing a death. In either case, the killer would be exiled from their city until they could be ritually absolved of their crime.

Bellerophon presented himself to King Proetus of Tiryns. As a king, Proetus had the authority to absolve the prince of his crime.

Proetus welcomed Bellerophon into his home as a guest. While there, however, the young man attracted the attention of the king’s wife.

Stheneboea, or Anteia as she was named in other sources, made several romantic advances toward her husband’s guest. As a noble man, however, Bellerophon rejected the queen’s affections.

Stheneboea was infuriated at the rejection and devised a lie to get back at Bellerophon. She told her husband that Bellerophon had attempted to assault her.

Proetus wanted to kill Bellerophon for this, but was prevented by one of the highest laws of the Greek gods. The murder of a guest, even one who had committed an offense in your home, was forbidden by Zeus’s laws of hospitality.

Instead, the king sent Bellerophon away to the city of his father-in-law, King Iobates of Lycia. He also sent a letter detailing Bellerophon’s supposed crime and asking Iobates to get revenge for his daughter’s sake.

When Bellerophon arrived in Lycia, however, the king did not read the letters. He welcomed the prince into his court for nine days before he learned that Proetus sought the man’s death.

Iobates was now held by the same laws that had prevented Proetus from seeking revenge. Bellerophon had been made a welcomed guest in his home and killing him would attract the anger of the gods.

Instead of sending him on, however, Iobates devised a clever way to see the man’s death without directly causing it. He sent Bellerophon on a quest to kill the vicious Chimera.

The monster had been terrorizing the neighboring lands, burning fields and destroying most of the landscape. No one had been able to kill it, and Iobates was certain Bellerophon would die in the attempt as well.

Bellerophon was sent to the land of Caria on a quest that would be almost certainly fatal.

The Taming of Pegasus

On his way to confront the Chimera, and probably meet his doom, Bellerophon happened to meet a famous seer, Polyeidus. This soothsayer was famous for the aid he gave the royal family of Crete, but had since left the island and given aid to many throughout the Greek world.

Polyeidos told Bellerophon that in order to win the fight against the Chimera he would need the aid of Pegasus. The offspring of Poseidon and Medusa, the winged horse had been living in the wild since its birth.

Athena would help him tame the wild horse if he asked for her favor. Polyeidos told the heroic prince to sleep in the goddess’s temple the next night to entreat her for aid.

Polyeidos also told him where to find the horse. Pegasus was fond of a particular spring near Bellerophon’s own city, Corinth, and stopped there often to drink.

Bellerophon did as the seer recommended and spent the next night in the nearest temple of Athena. The goddess who had once taught his mother appeared to him in a dream and laid a golden bridle next to him.

According to some sources, this was the first bridle ever invented. Bellerophon would still need the help of another god to tame the wild flying horse, though.

Athena told the hero to make a sacrifice to Poseidon, who in some versions of the story is Bellerophon’s father as well as that of Pegasus. As he sacrificed a white bull he was to hold up the bridle so the god could see it.

When Bellerophon awoke on the floor of the temple, the golden bridle was laying next to him just as it had been in the dream. He had won the favor of Athena.

On the following day Bellerophon made the sacrifice of a white bull to Poseidon as Athena had instructed him to do. He also built an altar to Athena to thank her for guiding him.

Having pleased both gods, he set out for Corinth and waited by the spring for Pegasus. Soon, he saw the immortal horse come down from the sky and stop to drink, just as Polydeimos had told him.

He slowly approached the horse and threw the bridle over its head. Pegasus resisted for a moment, but soon the combined influence of both Athena and Poseidon calmed him.

With little difficulty, Bellerophon was able to mount the previously wild horse. The first man to ever capture Pegasus was ready to ride him into battle against a horrible monster.

Bellerophon Defeats The Chimera

Riding on Pegasus, Bellerophon quickly made his way back to Asia Minor and the land of Caria. It did not take long to spot the lands that had been destroyed by the Chimera.

The monster had burned great swathes of land, leaving lasting flames in many places. At the center of the destruction was the Chimera itself.

The Chimera was a grotesque monster. It had the front parts of a lioness, the torso of a goat, and the tail of an enormous serpent. Later writers and artists added that it had three heads corresponding to each of its sections, with the goat head protruding from its back and the snake’s head at the end of its tail.

Most dangerous, though, was the Chimera’s fiery breath. The flames that came from its lion mouth were so hot they could melt swords and shields in moments.

Most accounts of Bellerophon’s story give few details as to how he managed to kill the monster. A few, however, note his ingenuity and the assistance provided by the flying horse.

Pegasus helped Bellerophon to dodge the monster’s fiery breath, using its agility and great speed to dodge the bursts of fire. Bellerophon could not manage to damage it, though.

The Chimera’s hide was too thick for arrows to pierce and even his spear did not break its skin. No matter how he attacked it, the monster remained unwounded.

The spear’s failure to stab the Chimera gave Bellerophon an idea, though. While the weapon’s point could not harm the monster, the clever hero realized that it could still prove useful.

Urging Pegasus to top speed, Bellerophon flew directly at the Chimera’s primary head, that of the lion. He aimed his spear at the monster’s open mouth, even though he knew it would cause no damage.

Bellerophon jabbed the spear into the Chimera’s throat just as Pegasus veered away. The weapon broke, leaving the lead tip of the spear lodged in the monster’s mouth.

When the Chimera attempted to breathe fire at them, the lead melted and blocked its airway. The Chimera suffocated on its own flames, falling dead without taking a single wound.

Bellerophon is usually remembered for his great victory against the Chimera. According to Homer, however, he had many other adventures of note.

When Bellerophon returned to King Iobates, the Lycian king was disappointed that he had survived the encounter. He sent Bellerophon on many other quests in an attempt to destroy him.

Next after this he fought against the glorious Solymoi (Solymi), and this he thought was the strongest battle with men that he entered but third he slaughtered the Amazones (Amazons), who fight men in battle. Now as he came back the king spun another entangling treachery for choosing the bravest men in wide Lykia he laid a trap, but these men never came home thereafter since all of them were killed by blameless Bellerophontes. Then when the king knew him for the powerful stock of the god, he detained him there, and offered him the hand of his daughter, and gave him half of all the kingly privilege. Thereto the men of Lykia cut out a piece of land, surpassing all others, fine ploughland and orchard for him to administer.

-Homer, Iliad 6. 144 – 221 ff (trans. Lattimore)

Finally, Iobates could not deny that Bellerophon had the favor of the gods. The Corinthian prince was given land in Lycia, which in his grandson’s time would be allied with Troy.

Links to Poseidon

Even in Homer’s writing, Bellerophon is described as the “powerful stock of a god.” Like many heroes, Bellerophon was often thought to be the son of a deity instead of his mother’s human husband.

Bellerophon’s human father and grandfather were known for their cruelty and the punishments they earned from the gods. By making him the son of Poseidon ancient writers not only explained his heroism, but also separated him from a line of wickedness.

According to some writers, Glaucus had been doomed by Zeus to never have sons of his own. This was due to either an offense against Aphrodite or his family’s evil behavior, depending on the source.

Aside from simply being described as Poseidon’s son, the character of Bellerophon had many links to the sea god. Some were original to the earliest tellings of the story, while others may have been added later to strengthen his connection to the god.


References [ edit | edit source ]

Medusa
Class: Rider
Master: Matou Sakura
Alignment: Chaotic Good
Sex: Female
Height: 172cm
Weight: 57kg
Armament: Dagger

STR: B
CON: D
AGI: A
MGI: B
LCK: E
Noble Phantasm: A+

Legend
Medusa was a frightening female monster in Greek mythology. She had a nest of poisonous snakes for hair, copper green scales for skin, golden wings on her back, and eyes that would turn anyone that met them to stone.
The story in which the hero Perseus slew Medusa is famous even in Japan. It's said that Perseus' divine blade Harpe sheared through Medusa's scaley skin, and Medusa's head contained the power of petrification even after being severed.
Medusa was originally a goddess, but a curse by the goddess Athena lowered her to a monster. The story goes that Medusa, overly proud of her own beauty, desecrated a temple to Athena.
According to the Theogony describing the genealogy of the Greek gods, Medusa had a pair of twin older sisters named Stheno and Euryale. Together they were known as the three Gorgon (derived from ancient Greek gorgós, meaning "dreadful") sisters.
It is written that the aboriginal Pelasgians worshiped Medusa when she was still a goddess. After the Pelasgians were conquered by other groups, Medusa was demonized from a great earth goddess into a monster.
After becoming a Heroic Spirit, she retains her wholesome beauty even while possessing the Mystic Eyes of Petrification. Her flying steed Pegasus was said to have been born from a piece of her severed head, or created by her blood when it dripped into the ocean.


Tactics
Medusa specializes in close combat, taking advantage of her high Agility and Monstrous Strength. Her weapons of choice are chained daggers. While quite lethal, they are not Noble Phantasms, so it is difficult to deal critical blows with them when fighting Servants. Medusa excels in a fight using Noble Phantasms. She can annihilate many enemies at once using her anti-army Noble Phantasm Bellerophon (Bridle of Chivalry), which requires an enormous amount of prana. Additionally, she has several methods of attack that can be adapted to a wide variety of situations, such as Blood Fort Andromeda (Outsider Seal - Blood Temple) which can close off a targeted area and dissolve the humans inside to obtain prana, and Cybele (Mystic Eyes of Petrification) which is normally sealed beneath her blindfold.

Class Abilities
Magic Resistance: B
Originally a Greek goddess that turned into a monster, she possesses extremely high Magic Resistance. The Magic Resistance ability that the Rider class possesses is weaker than that of the three knight classes, but the fact that it remains so high is thanks to Medusa's inherently high Magic Resistance.
Rank B Magic Resistance easily nullifies spells of three bars or less. It is also difficult to damage Medusa with even high thaumaturgy and grand rituals. Moreover, Medusa herself is skilled in sorcery, so she has countless ways to counter enemy spells. In other words, Medusa is excellent at fighting magi. Backing all that up is her Agility. Compared to Lancer who boasts the same level of "speed" she is inferior in sudden bursts, but has more endurance. Even with powerful spells, it is extremely hard to hit Medusa who will keep moving at high speed.

Riding: A+
As might be expected of the Servant Rider, Medusa posses a high rank in the Riding ability. But instead of covering only specific animals and vehicles, her ability extends to nearly all beasts, including Phantasmal Beasts and Divine Beasts. However, even with an excellent Riding rank, she cannot ride dragons.
The steed that makes best use of Medusa's Riding ability is the legendary winged horse Pegasus. Mastering a winged horse of the Phantasmal Species is a difficult accomplishment even for Rider-class Servants. When riding the heavenly mount that was born of her own blood, both rider and steed move as one.
When the Noble Phantasm Bellerophon is used, all of Pegasus's abilities are drastically increased for a limited time. Even in the story, this combination was able to toy with Saber by attacking from the skies, forcing her into a difficult battle.
Be that as it may, the only time Medusa was able to use Bellerophon was in her fight against Artoria. During the modern Holy Grail War which unfolded in a sprawling city, Medusa had few opportunities to use her Riding ability. Perhaps because of this, she was eliminated without sufficient chance to use her power.

Personal Skills
Mystic Eyes: A+
Eyes that originally function to collect visual information are instead a method to impart magical effects upon a subject. Medusa possesses the Mystic Eyes of Petrification "Cybele", which are Mystic Eyes of the highest order. As in her legend, subjects caught in her vision will be petrified if their Magic Resistance is C or lower.
Caption: Medusa's Mystic Eyes of Petrification cannot be replicated by magic.

Independent Action: C
The ability to materialize independently. If the Master is lost (or if the contract is nullified), Medusa can continue to materialize for one day. Since Medusa can also obtain prana by drinking blood, she can prey on humans as the situation demands and extend this duration.
Caption: Thanks to Independent Action, Medusa was able to return to Sakura after Matou Shinji was defeated.

Monstrous Strength: B
Medusa has this skill due to her property as a monster despite being a Heroic Spirit. If used, she can temporarily magnify her Strength. This is a necessary skill to Medusa, who does not fight with Noble Phantasms in close combat. It has many uses with her chained daggers, such as forcibly dragging an impaled opponent around.
Caption: Medusa possesses high close combat ability thanks to Monstrous Strength.

Divinity: E-
In Greek mythology, Medusa was once a beautiful goddess, so she originally has very high Divinity. However, because she later became a monster, she is an unusual being possessing the "monstrous" attribute that is antithetical to normal Heroic Spirits. Thanks to this, Medusa manifests as both a goddess with Riding, and a monster possessing Mystic Eyes, Monstrous Strength and so forth. Nonetheless, her aptitude as a goddess Divine Spirit is mostly degraded.
However, her Divinity has not been completely eliminated, and it appears that she still has it.


Noble Phantasms
Breaker Gorgon
Rank: C-
Type: Anti-Unit
Range: 0
Maximum Targets: 1 Person

One of Medusa's anti-personnel Noble Phantasms, Breaker Gorgon is the counterpart Bounded Field thaumaturgy to Blood Fort Andromeda. While the target's consciousness is sealed within Medusa's mind, the target can be prevented from activating any abilities. Also, Medusa primarily uses somewhat weak Noble Phantasm not on others, but on herself to seal her Mystic Eyes of Petrification that are normally always active.
Though mainly used to seal Mystic Eyes, its original use is obviously to exert a degree of mind control on the opponent. Actually, when she took control of enemy Master Emiya Shirou's mind and gave him erotic dreams, she was actually trying to extract prana from him. Also, it requires only a steady stream of prana to have an effect. It is difficult for individuals with low magic resistance to notice it, much less avoid it.


Bellerophon
Rank: A+
Type: Anti-Army
Range: 2

50
Maximum Targets: 300 People

Medusa's most powerful attack. It is not a Noble Phantasm to be used in a one-on-one fight, but rather an "anti-army Noble Phantasm" that can cut down enemies in a wide area. An uncommon type of Noble Phantasm consisting of a paired bridle and whip, it can rapidly augment the abilities of Phantasmal Species. In battle, the strengthened Phantasmal Beast and Medusa fight as one.
Bellerophon is extraordinarily powerful whether used defensively or offensively. However, during the Holy Grail War, it could not display its merit when matched against the more powerful Noble Phantasm wielded by Artoria. Nonetheless, the fact alone that it temporarily withstood a full frontal attack by Excalibur is evidence of its great power.

Blood Fort Andromeda
Rank: B
Type: Anti-Army
Range: 10

40
Maximum Targets: 500 People

One of Medusa's Noble Phantasms, Blood Fort Andromeda is the counterpart Bounded Field thaumaturgy to Breaker Gorgon. It takes the form of magic circles placed as predetermined points. Immediately following the placing of these circles, people within the affected area will only have their life force sapped slightly, but once the field is activated, they will be quickly dissolved. However, it is difficult to affect people with knowledge of thaumaturgy. Thus, it is not a Noble Phantasm to be used for combat, but rather a Bounded Field created by Medusa to efficiently gather blood to drink for prana.
In the Holy Grail War, Blood Fort Andromeda was deployed at Homurahara Academy and activated. From outside the field, the school appeared normal as usual, but the interior was stained with blood, as its name suggests.

Bridle of Chivalry [Noble Phantasm]
Bellerophon.
An atypical Noble Phantasm. A weapon set consisted of a rein and a whip. Of course, it had no power by itself.
As a Noble Phantasm, it had A+ rank, with abnormally high attack as well as defensive powers.
A Pegasus under the control of Bellerophon would exceed its limits and receive a rank-up in all of its attributes. Furthermore, due to the protection of an immense amount of mana from Bellerophon, the defensive power of the Pegasus would multiply several times.
If Saber's Excalibur was a golden beam, then Rider was the white comet.
Mmm, as an aside, the name of the young man who rode the Pegasus in Greek legend was Bellerophon.

騎英の手綱 【宝具】
ベルレフォーン。
宝具の中でも変り種で、手綱と鞭のセット武装。 無論、単体では効果はない。
ランクA+の宝具で、攻守ともに破格の能力を持つ。
ベルレフォーンで操られた天馬はリミッターをカットされ、全ての能力値を1ランクアップし,膨大な魔 力の守りにより防御力を数倍に向上させる。
セイバーのエクスカリバーが黄金のフレアなら、ライダーは白い彗星と言えるだろう。
あ。余談ですが、ギリシャ神話でベカサスを乗りこなした青年の名は、正しくはペルレフォンでーす。


Bellerophon ARL-31 - History

LST - 1001-1150

LST-1001 was laid down on 18 April 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 26 May 1944 spon sored by Mrs. Eva B. Rockett and commissioned on 20 June 1944, Lt. Comdr. G. C. Masterson, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1001 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-September 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 26 February 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June that same year. On 23 October 1947, the ship was sold to the New Orleans Shipwrecking Corp., Chicago, Ill., for scrapping. LST-1001 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1002 was laid down on 3 May 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 8 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Mary E. Nelson and commissioned on 25 June 1944, Lt. S. Edelson, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1002 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto from April through June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-October 1945. The ship was decommissioned on 22 May 1946 and transferred to the State Department for disposition that same day. She was struck from the Navy list on 3 July 1946. LST-1002 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1003 was redesignated ARL-10 and named Coronis (q.v.) on 14 August 1944.

LST-1004 was laid down on 26 January 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 3 March 1944 and commissioned on 28 March 1944. LST-1004 performed no combatant service during World War II. She was decommissioned on 27 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 7 February 1947. On 16 October 1947, the ship was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., Seattle, Wash., for scrapping.

LST-1005 was laid down on 2 February 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 11 March 1944 and commissioned on 6 April 1944. Following World War 11, LST-1005 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early 1946. She was decommissioned on 6 April 1946 after removal of all salvageable equipment following damage sustained in beaching operations. Her hulk was later destroyed. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 17 April 1946.

LST-1006 was laid down on 5 February 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 11 March 1944 and commissioned on 12 April 1944, Lt. Vardy D. Garvey in command. During World War II, LST-1006 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Leyte landings-October 1944 Zambales-Subic Bay-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April through June 1945 Following the war, LST-1006 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late March 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 26 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 14 June 1948, the ship was sold to Steele Powers for operation. LST-1006 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1007 was laid down on 8 February 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 20 March 1944 and commissioned on 15 April 1944. During World War II, LST-1007 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Tarakan Island operation in April and May 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until late October 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 2 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 12 April that same year. On 12 September 1946, the ship was sold to the Construction Power & Merchandising Co., of Brooklyn, N.Y. LST-1007 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1008 was laid down on 16 February 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 23 March 1944 and commissioned on 18 April 1944. Following World War 11, LST-1008 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early May 1946. She was decommissioned on 4 May 1946 and transferred to the State Department for disposition that same date. She was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946.

LST-1009 was laid down on 22 February 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 23 March 1944 and commissioned on 22 April 1944. Following World War II, LST-1009 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-April 1946. She was decommissioned on 17 July 1946 and transferred to the United States Army. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 14 March 1947.

LST-1010 was laid down on 22 February 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 29 March 1944 and commissioned on 25 April 1944. During World War II, LST-1010 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of southern France in August 1944. She was then assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, the ship performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-January 1946. LST-1010 was transferred to the United States Army on 4 April 1947 and returned to United States Navy custody on 1 March 1950. She was later transferred to the Republic of Korea Navy on 22 March 1955 where she served as Un Pong (LST-807). LST-1010 earned two battle stars for World War 11 service.

LST-1011 was laid down on 29 February 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 29 March 1944 and commissioned on 5 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1011 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was then assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and took part in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. The ship returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 20 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 12 June 1948, she was sold to the Walter W. Johnson Co. for scrapping. LST-1011 earned two battle stars for World War II service. LST-1012

LST-1012 was laid down on 4 March 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 8 April 1944 and commissioned on 30 April 1944, Lt. Comdr. M. J. Flowers, Jr., USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1012 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of southern France in August and September 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early June 1946. The ship was decommissioned on 10 June 1946 and transferred to the State Department for disposal that same date. She was struck from the Navy list on 19 July 1946. LST-1012 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1013 was laid down on 13 March at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 16 April 1944 and commissioned on 2 May 1944, Lt. Charles K. Carroll, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1013 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Leyte landings-October 1944 Lingayen Gulf landings-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April through June 1945 Following the war, LST-1013 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early June 1946. She was decommissioned on 11 June 1946 and transferred to the State Department for disposition that same date. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 19 July 1946. LST-1013 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1014 was laid down on 15 March 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 16 April 1944 and commissioned on 5 May 1944, Lt. William H. Weldon, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1014 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands - September and October 1944 Leyte landings-November 1944 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April through June 1945 Following the war, LST-1014 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late October 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 5 March 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 17 April that same year. On 12 September 1946, the ship was sold to the Construction Power & Merchandising Co., Brooklyn, N.Y. LST-1014 earned three battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1015 was laid down on 22 March 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 20 April 1944 and commissioned on 8 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1015 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Capture and occupation of southern Palau Islands - September through October 1944 Leyte landings-October and November 1944 Lingayen Gulf landings-January 1945 Assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto-April 1945 Following the war, LST-1015 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early May 1946. She was decommissioned on 6 May 1946 and transferred to the State Department for disposition that same date, The ship was struck from the Navy list on 19 June 1946. LST-1 015 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1016 was laid down on 25 March 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 25 April and commissioned on 10 May 1944, Lt. John W. Chapman, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1016 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Mindanao Island landings in April 1945 and the Balikpapan operation in June and July 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until midFebruary 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 26 June 1946 and struck from the -Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 9 December 1947, the ship was sold to the Learner Co., Oakland, Calif., for scrapping. LST-1016 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1017 was laid down on 25 March 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 25 April 1944 and commissioned on 12 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1017 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Morotai landings-September 1944 Leyte landings-November 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Mindanao Island landings-April 1945 Brunei Bay operation-June and July 1945 Following the war, LST-1017 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late June 1946. She was decommissioned on 29 June 1946 and transferred to the Republic of China on 14 December 1946. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1948. LST-1017 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1018 was laid down on 31 March 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 6 May 1944 and commissioned on 14 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1018 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Morotai landings-September 1944 Leyte landings-November 1944 Lingayen Gulf landing-January 1945 Mindanao Island landings-April 1945 Balikpapan operation-June and July 1945 Following the war, LST-1018 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-January 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 16 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947. On 24 June 1948, the ship was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., Seattle, Wash., for scrapping. LST-1018 earned five battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1019 was laid down on 31 March 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 6 May 1944 and commissioned on 17 May 1944, Lt. Comdr. Norman C. Ross, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1019 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. Later transferred to the Asiatic-Pacific theater, she engaged in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 30 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September that same year. On 28 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Humble Oil & Refining Co., Houston, Tex., for operation. LST-1019 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1020 was laid down on 11 April 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 10 May 1944 and commissioned on 19 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1020 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 16 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 13 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Walter W. Johnson Co. for scrapping. LST-1020 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1021 was laid down on 18 April 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 16 May 1944 and commissioned on 21 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1021 was assigned to the European theater and participated in the invasion of southern France in August and September 1944. She was transferred to the United Kingdom on 24 December 1944. The ship was returned to United States Navy custody and struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1947. On 7 October 1947, she was sold to Tung Hwa Trading Co., Singapore. LST-1021 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1022 was laid down on 18 April 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 16 May 1944 and commissioned on 24 May 1944, Lt. William D. Henderson in command. During World War II, LST-1022 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early August 1946. She was decommissioned on 31 December 1947 and struck from the Navy list on 22 January 1948. On 28 June 1948, the ship was sold to R. G. Greive for scrapping. LST-1022 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1023 was laid down on 20 April 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 17 May 1944 and commissioned on 26 May 1944. Following World War II, LST-1023 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 19 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 18 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Humble Oil & Refining Co., Houston, Tex., for operation.

LST-1024 was laid down on 26 April 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 22 May 1944 and commissioned on 28 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1024 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Leyte landings in October 1944 and the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in April and May 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until late December 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 27 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 12 March 1948, the ship was sold to Alexander Shipyards, Inc., for operation. LST-1024 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1025 was laid down on 26 April 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 22 May 1944 and commissioned on 31 May 1944. During World War II, LST-1025 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Leyte landings-October and November 1944 Zambales-Subic Bay-January 1945 Visayan Islands landings-March 1945 Tarakan Island operation-April and May 1945 Following the war, LST-1025 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 24 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 15 August that same year. On 11 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Walter W. Johnson Co. for scrapping. LST-1025 earned four battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1026 was laid down on 8 May 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 2 June 1944 and commissioned on 7 June 1944, Lt. R. E. Parker, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1026 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Leyte landings in October and November 1944 and the Mindanao Island landings in March and April 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid-July 1946. She was decommissioned on 11 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 5 December 1947, the ship was sold to Bosey, Philippines. LST-1026 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1027 was laid down on 8 May 1944 at Quincy, Mass., by the Bethlehem Steel Co. launched on 2 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Harry A. Hassan and commissioned on 7 June 1944. During World War If, LST-1027 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Leyte landings-November 1944 Lingayen Gulf landings-January 1945 Mindanao Island landings-March 1945 Following the war, LST-1027 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early September 1946, She was decommissioned on 4 September 1946 and sold to Bosey, Philippines, on 20 January 1947. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 23 April 1947. LST-1027 earned three battle stars for World War If service.

LST-1028 was laid down on 15 May 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 18 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Susanna C. Curran and commissioned on 7 July 1944, Lt. N. L. Knipe, Jr., USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1028 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Lingayen Gulf landings in January 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 19 November 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 5 December that same year. On 29 August 1947, the ship was sold to the Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co., Seattle, Wash.' for scrapping. LST-1028 earned one battle star for World War 11 service.

LST-1029 was laid down on 15 May 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 18 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Stanley Madey and commissioned on 13 July 1944, Lt. 1. H. Vincent, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1029 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Lingayen Gulf landing in January 1945 and the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto from April through June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until late October 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 1 May 1946 and sold to the Suwannee Fruit & Steamship Co., Jacksonville, Fla., on 31 October 1946. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 10 June 1947. LST-1029 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1030 was laid down on 27 May 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 25 June 1944 sponsored by Miss Irene M. O'Brien and commissioned on 19 July 1944, Lt. (jg.) S. W. Farnham, USNR, in command. During World War 11, LST-1030 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Lingayen Gulf landing in January 1945 and the assault and occu pation of Okinawa Gunto from April through June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late May 1946. The ship was decommissioned on 29 May 1946 and transferred to the Republic of China Navy on 17 February 1948 where she served as Chung Chuan (LST-221). She was struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1948. LST-1030 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1031 was laid down on 27 May 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 25 June 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Priscilla A. Daudelin and commissioned on 25 July 1944, Lt. C. W. Price in command. During World War II, LST-1031 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 18 December 1945 and struck from the Navy list on 8 January 1946. On 23 October 1947, the ship was sold to the Boston Metals Corp., of Baltimore, Md., for scrapping. LST-1031 earned one battle star for World War 11 service.

LST-1032 was laid down on 9 June 1944 by the Boston Navy Yard launched on 9 July 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Jennie M. Kneeland and commissioned on 1 August 1944, Lt. J. M. Medina in command. During World War II, LST-1032 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Iwo Jima in February 1945 and the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto from April through June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until late October 1945. On 1 July 1955, she was redesignated Monmouth County (LST-1032) (q.v.) after a county in New Jersey. The ship was decommissioned on 14 November 1955 and assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. Monmouth County was recommissioned on 28 May 1963 and performed extensive service during the Vietnam War. Decommissioned again in 1970, Monmouth County was struck from the Navy list on 12 August 1970. LST-1032 earned two battle stars for World War II service and one award of the Navy Unit Commendation, one award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation, and 11 battle stars for the Vietnam War.

LST-1033 was laid down on 9 June 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 9 July 1944 sponsored by Miss Mary Theresa O'Donnell and commissioned on 12 August 1944, Lt. J. W. Robinson, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1033 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Iwo Jima in February 1945 and the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto from April through June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid-July. She was redesignated LSTH-1033 on 15 September 1945. The ship was decommissioned on I August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 5 December 1947, she was sold to Bosey, Philippines. LST-1033 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1034 was laid down on 26 June 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 4 August 1944 spon sored by Mrs. Edith A. Gannon and commissioned on 26 August 1944, Lt. (jg.) Paul C. Greenwell, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1034 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the Mindanao Island landings in April 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early September 1946. The ship was decommissioned on 8 October 1946 and sold to the Netherlands East Indies on 28 October that same year. She was struck from the Navy list on 29 October 1946. LST-1034 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1035 was laid down on 26 June 1944 at the Boston Navy Yard launched on 4 August 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Ella M. Kelleher and commissioned on 1 September 1944, Lt. M. Perry in command. During World War 11 LST-1035 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the following operations: Palawan Island landings-March 1945 Visayan Islands landings-March and April 1945 Tarakan Island operation-April and May 1945 Following the war, LST-1035 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 6 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July that same year. On 16 December 1947, the ship was sold to the Learner Co., Oakland, Calif., for scrapping. LST-1035 earned two battle stars for World War II service.

LST-1036 was redesignated ARL-11 and named Creon (q.v.) on 14 August 1944. LST-1037 LST-1037 was redesignated ARL-12 and named Poseidon (q.v.) on 14 August 1944.

LST-1038 was laid down on 29 October 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 6 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Elwood Printz and commissioned on 5 February 1945, Lt. Julius Wood in command. During World War 11, LST-1038 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She then operated as a training ship for naval reservists in the New York area. Decommissioned in 1949, LST-1038 was assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet berthed at Green Cove Springs, Fla. On I July 1955, she was redesignated Monroe County (LST-1038) (q.v.) after counties in 17 states. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1958. LST-1038 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1039 was laid down on 26 November 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 6 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Jack H. Johnston and commissioned on 9 February 1945, Lt. G. E. Paris in command. During World War II, LST-1039 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 21 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 2 September 1947, the ship was sold to the Columbia River Packers Association, Inc., for operation. LST-1039 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1040 was laid down on 3 December 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 13 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Charles L. Hoffman and commissioned on 13 February 1945, Lt. George E. Cooper, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1040 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid-July 1946. She was decommissioned on 23 September 1946 and sold to the Netherlands East Indies on 5 October that same year. On 23 April 1947, the ship was struck from the Navy list. LST-1040 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1041 was laid down on 12 November 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 20 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. D. W. Raegler and commissioned on 19 February 1945. Following World War II, LST-1041 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid- December 1945. She saw extensive service with the Atlantic Fleet for a decade. The ship was redesignated Montgomery County (LST-1041) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after counties in 18 states of the United States. She was decommissioned on 31 January 1956 and assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 1 June 1960 and sold to West Germany in August that same year.

LST-1042 was laid down on 10 December 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 20 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. A. M. Shields and commissioned on 22 February 1945, Lt. Patrick Connolly, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1042 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, LST-1042 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early May 1946. The ship was decommissioned on 9 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June that same year. LST-1042 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1043 was laid down on 17 December 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 27 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. George W. Johnston and commissioned on 24 February 1945, Lt. Clifford Off, Jr., USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1043 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late September 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 22 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 28 August that same year. On 10 December 1947, the ship was sold to the Learner Co., of Oakland, Calif., for scrapping.

LST-1044 was laid down on 25 November 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 3 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. J. D. Port and commissioned on 2 March 1945, Lt. Frank P. Eldredge in command. Following World War II, LST-1044 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid-April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 28 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 8 January 1948, the ship was sold to Pablo N. Ferrari & Co. for operation.

LST-1045 was laid down on 22 December 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 3 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. William G. Rudge and commissioned on 27 March 1945. Following World War II, LST-1045 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late February 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 10 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 15 August 1946. On 9 December 1947, the ship was sold to James A. Hughes, New York, N.Y., for scrapping.

LST-1046 was laid down on 31 December 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 10 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Florence M. Teepe and commissioned on 28 March 1945, Lt. R. P. McGhie in command. Following World War II, LST-1046 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 27 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. The ship was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., Seattle, Wash., on 25 September 1947 for scrapping.

LST-1047 was laid down on 9 December 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 17 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. J. W. Deist and commissioned on 28 March 1945, Lt Charles G. Wood in command. Following World War II, LST-1047 performed occupation duty in the Par East until mid-December 1945. The ship was decommissioned on 6 May 1946 and transferred to the Army on 25 June that same year. On 29 September 1947, she was struck from the Navy list.

LST-1048 was laid down on 7 January 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 17 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. L. P. Struble and commissioned on 28 March 1945, Lt. Robert G. Stevenson in command. Following World War II, LST-1048 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945. She was decommissioned on 14 May 1946 and assigned to the United States Army. Following the outbreak of hostilities in Korea, she was recommissioned on 26 August 1950 and performed extensive service during that war. The ship was redesignated Morgan County (LST-1048) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 for counties in 11 states of the United States. She was decommissioned again on 10 May 1956 and transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service. Struck from the Navy list on 1 August 1959, she was sold to Ships, Inc., Miami, Fla., on 10 June 1960. LST-1048 earned one battle star for the Korean War.

LST-1049 was laid down on 14 January 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 24 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Walter Malec and commissioned on 30 March 1945, Lt. Sheldon Potter, III, USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1049 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-April 1946. She was decommissioned on 18 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 February 1948. On 1 July 1949, the ship was sold to the Townsend Transportation Co., Bayonne, N.J.

LST-1050 was laid down on 23 December 1944 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 3 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Oscar Enigson, Jr. and commissioned on 3 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1050 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late January 1947. She was decommissioned and transferred to the Republic of China under the terms of lend-lease on 27 January 1947 where she served as Chung Lien (LST-209). The ship was struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1948.

LST-1051 was laid down on 21 January 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp, launched on 3 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Charles F. Posten and commissioned on 7 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1051 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 7 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 5 June that same year. On 13 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Walter W. Johnson Co., for scrapping.

LST-1052 was laid down on 29 January 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 6 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. M. M. Lachowski and commissioned on 15 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1052 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early March 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 11 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 15 August that same year. On 25 September 1947, the ship was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., Seattle, Wash., for scrapping.

LST-1053 was laid down on 6 January 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 6 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. William F. Thorpe and commissioned on 23 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1053 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommis sioned on 3 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July that same year. On 8 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Humble Oil & Refining Co., Houston, Tex., for operation.

LST-1054 was laid down on 4 February 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 17 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. R. L. Stallings and commissioned on 17 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1054 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 28 June 1946 and sruck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 25 November 1947, the ship was sold to the Bethlehem Steel Co., Bethlehem, Pa., for scrapping.

LST-1055 was laid down on 10 February 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 24 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. R. T. Miles and commissioned on 26 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1055 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1947. She was decommissioned on 13 February 1947 and transferred to the United States Army that same date. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 25 February 1947.

LST-1056 was laid down on 20 January 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 24 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. W. M. Harrison and commissioned on 2 May 1945. Following World War II, LST-1056 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early July 1946. She was decommissioned on 12 July 1946 and sold to Bosey, Philippines, on 20 January 1947. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 10 June 1947.

LST-1057 was laid down on 17 February 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 31 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. E. W. McKinley and commissioned on 7 May 1945. Following World War II, LST-1057 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early March 1946. The ship returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 5 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September that same year. She was sold to Pablo N. Ferrari & Co. on 12 January 1948 for operation.

LST-1058 was laid down on 24 February 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 7 April 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Harry Schoeffel and commissioned on 16 May 1945. LST-1058 performed no active service. She was decommissioned on 30 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September that same year. On 13 June 1948, she was sold to the Walter W. Johnson Co. for scrapping.

LST-1059 was laid down on 3 March 1945 at Pittsburgh, Pa., by the Dravo Corp. launched on 14 April 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Corinne G. Harris and commissioned on 17 May 1945. Following World War II, LST-1059 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid-July 1946. She was decommissioned on 14 September 1946 and sold to the Morrison Knudsen Co., Shanghai, China, on 14 January 1947. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 23 April 1947.

LST-1060 was laid down on 22 December 1944 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 29 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Alice M. Wiggin and commissioned on 24 February 1945. Following World War II, LST-1060 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid-July 1946. She was decommissioned on 7 September 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 April 1947. On 13 February 1948, the ship was sold to Bosey, Philippines.

LST-1061 was laid down on 26 December 1944 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 3 February 1945 spohsored by Mrs. Ada Smith and commissioned on 1 March 1945, Lt. G. A. Johnson in command. Following World War II, LST-1061 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-September 1945. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 1 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July that same year. On 1 March 1948, the ship was sold to the Texas Petroleum Co. for operation.

LST-1062 was laid down on 30 December 1944 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 6 February 1945 and commissioned on 5 March 1945, Lt. T. M. Robinson in command. Following World War II, LST-1062 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early April 1946. She returned to the United States and was decommissioned on 27 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 31 July that same year. On 25 November 1947, the ship was sold to the Bethlehem Pacific Coast Steel Corp. for scrapping.

LST-1063 was laid down on 3 January 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 11 February 1945 and commissioned on 8 March 1945. Following World War 11, LST-1063 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early April 1946. She was transferred to the Maritime Administration for disposal on 30 June 1948.

LST-1064 was laid down on 9 January 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 14 February 1945 and commissioned on 12 March 1945, Lt. Leland H. Austin in command. Following World War II, LST-1064 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late December 1945. She was decommissioned, on 21 August 1946 and redesignated Nansemond Comity (LST-1064) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after a county in southeastern Virginia. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 1 October 1959 and sold to Japan in April 1961 where she served as Shiretoko (LST-4003). Reobtained from Japan in 1975, Nonsemond County was transferred to the Philippines on 24 September 1976.

LST-1065 was laid down on 12 January 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 17 February 1945 and commissioned on 16 March 1945. Following World War II, LST-1065 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early January 1946. She was decommissioned on 23 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947. On 17 January 1948, the ship was sold to Compania Naviera y Commercial Perez Compano S.A., Buenos Aires, Argentina, for operation.

LST-1066 was laid down on 18 January 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 21 February 1945 sponsored by Miss Cynthia L. Rowan and commissioned on 20 March 1945, Lt. E. J. Gilman in command. Following World War II, LST-1066 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945. She was decommissioned in March 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. The ship was redesignated New London County (LST-1066) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after a county in southeastern Connecticut. She was recommissioned on 21 December 1965 and performed service in the Far East. Decommissioned again on 27 February 1967, New London County was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service. She was later sold to Chile where she serves as Commandante Hemerdinger (LST-88). LST-1066 earned two battle stars for Vietnam service.

LST-1067 was laid down on 24 January 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 27 February 1945 and commissioned on 24 March 1945, Lt. P. H. White in command. Following World War II, LST-1067 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She was decommissioned on 13 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. The ship was redesignated Nye County (LST-1067) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after a county in Nevada. She was recommissioned on 21 December 1965 and performed service in the Far East. Decommissioned again on 27 March 1967, Nye County was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service. She was later sold to Chile in August 1973 where she serves as Commandante Araya (LST- 89). LST-1067 earned two battle stars for Vietnam service.

LST-1068 was laid down on 31 January 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 3 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Alice R. Wilbur and commissioned on 27 March 1945, Lt. Clinton E. Voyles in command. Following World War 11, LST-1068 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late November 1945. She was decommissioned on 9 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 8 September 1950, she performed extensive service during the Korean War. The ship was redesignated Orange County (LST-1068) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after counties in eight states of the United States. She was decommissioned again on 27 September 1957 and struck from the Navy list that same date. Orange County was subsequently sunk as a target vessel on 18 June 1958. LST-1068 earned four battle stars for the Korean War.

LST-1069 was laid down on 7 February 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 7 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. James Whitfield and commissioned on 31 March 1945, Lt. Lewis A. Rockwell in command. Following World War II, LST-1069 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late March 1946. She was decommissioned on 6 August 1946 and assigned to the Naval Reserve Program. Recommissioned on 11 January 1952, she was converted to a mine warfare flagship and logistic support vessel. The ship was redesignated Orleans Parish (LST-1069) (q.v.) on I July 1955 after a parish in Louisiana. Decommissioned again on 20 May 1966, Orleans Parish was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service where she operated in the Far East. Orleans Parish was transferred to the Philippines on 13 September 1976. LST-1070 LST-1070 was redesignated AG-146 and named Electron (q.v.) on 27 January 1949.

LST-1071 was laid down on 13 February 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 14 March 1945 and commissioned on 9 April 1945, Lt. W. C. Scott in command. Following World War II, LST-1071 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She was decommissioned on 10 June 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 3 January 1951, she operated for the next five years with the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. The ship was redesignated Ouachita County (LST-1071) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 for a county in Arizona. She was decommissioned again on 15 February 1956 and berthed at Green Cove Springs, Fla., until she was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1959.

LST-1072 was laid down on 16 February 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 20 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Florence Mitchell and commissioned on 12 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1072 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service on 2 April 1951 where she operated as USNS LST-1072. The ship was transferred to the Philippines on 13 September 1976.

LST-1073 was laid down on 20 February 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 22 March 1945 and commissioned on 17 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1073 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She was decommissioned on 5 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. The ship was recommissioned on 3 November 1950 and performed extensive service during the Korean War. On 1 July 1955, she was redesignated Outagamie County (LST-1073) (q.v.) after a county in Wisconsin. She subsequently supported Navy operations in the Vietnam theater. Outagamie County was decommissioned again on 21 May 1971 and transferred to the Brazilian Navy where she saw service as Garcia D'Avila (G-28). The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 1 December 1973. LST-1073 earned five battle stars for the Korean War and eight battle stars for the Vietnam War.

LST-1074 was laid down on 24 February 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 27 March 1945 and commissioned on 21 April 1945, Lt. John Gay in command. LST-1074 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She was decommissioned on 4 September 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. The ship was redesignated Overton County (LST-1074) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after a county in Tennessee. The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1958.

LST-1075 was laid down on 5 March 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 3 April 1945 and commissioned on 25 April 1945. Following World War II, LST-1075 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid- December 1946. She was decommissioned and transferred to the Republic of China Navy on 18 December 1946. The ship was struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1948.

LST-1076 was laid down on 16 March 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 14 April 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Lillian J. Ostler and commissioned on 1 May 1945, Lt. Grover L. Rawlings, USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1076 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late September 1945. She was decommissioned on 13 June 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. The ship was redesignated Page County (LST- 1076) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after counties in Iowa and Virginia. Following modernization, she was recommissioned on 28 November 1960. Page County operated with the Pacific Fleet in the ensuing decade, including extensive service in Vietnam. She was decommissioned once again on 5 March 1971 and leased to the Greek Navy where she served as Kriti (L-171). LST-1076 earned six battle stars for the Vietnam War.

LST-1077 was laid down on 21 March 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 18 April 1945 and commissioned on 8 May 1945, Lt. 1. W. Matthews in command. Following World War II, LST-1077 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late November 1945. She was decommissioned on 31 July 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 6 September 1950, LST- 1077 performed extensive service during the Korean War. She was decommissioned once again on 12 May 1955. The ship was redesignated Park County (LST-1077) (q.v.) after counties in Colorado, Montana, and Wyoming. She was later completely modernized and recommissioned on 9 April 1966 for service in the Vietnam War. Park County was decommissioned for the final time and transferred to the Mexican Navy in September 1971 where she served as Rio Pavueo (IA-1). LST-1077 earned five battle stars for the Korean War and one award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation, two awards of the Navy Unit Commendation, and 11 battle stars for the Vietnam War.

LST-1078 was redesignated AG-147 and named Proton (q.v.) on 27 January 1949. LST-1079 LST-1079 was laid down on 30 March 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 27 April 1945 and commissioned on 22 May 1945, Lt. William A. Putnam, Jr., USNR, in command. LST-1079 was decommissioned in March 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned in October 1950, she operated with the Atlantic Fleet. On 1 July 1955, the ship was redesignated Payette County (LST-1079) (q.v.) after a county in Idaho. Decommissioned again on 1 November 1959 and struck from the Navy list that same date, she was sold to Zidell Explorations, Inc., Astoria, Oreg., on 18 May 1961.

LST-1080 was laid down on 5 April 1945 at Hingham, Mass., by the Bethlehem-Hingham Shipyard, Inc. launched on 2 May 1945 and commissioned on 29 May 1945. Following World War 11, LST-1080 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She was decommissioned on 29 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. The ship was recommissioned on 3 October 1950 and operated extensively during the Korean War. She was redesignated Pender County (LST-1080) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after a county in North Carolina. Decommissioned for the last time on 2 January 1958, Pender County was transferred to the Republic of Korea Navy in October 1958 where she served as Hwa San (LST-816). The tank landing ship was struck from the Navy list on 6 February 1959. LST-1080 earned four battle stars for Korean War service.

LST-1081 was laid down on 13 November 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 5 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. J. L. Davidson, Jr. and commissioned on 30 January 1945. LST-1081 was decommissioned on 30 July 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 2 February 1951, she operated with the Amphibious Force, U.S. Atlantic Fleet. She was redesignated Pima County (LST- 1081) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after a county in Arizona. The tank landing ship was decommissioned once again on 12 December 1956. Struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1958, she was sold in June 1960.

LST-1082 was laid down on 18 November 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 26 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Stephen Anzia and commissioned on 7 February 1945, Lt. John B. Cameron, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1082 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She was decommissioned on 5 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 6 September 1950, she performed extensive service during the Korean War. The ship was redesignated Pitkin County (LST-1082) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 for a county in Colorado. She was decommissioned once again on 1 September 1955 and reassigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 9 July 1966, Pitkin County operated in the Vietnam theater for the next five years. She was decommissioned for the last time on 1 September 1971. LST-1082 earned one battle star for World War II service, four battle stars for Korean War service, and two awards of the Navy Unit Commendation, one award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation, and 10 battle stars for Vietnam War service.

LST-1083 was laid down on 22 November 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 14 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Orren Brown and commissioned on 13 February 1945, Lt. Donald W. Homes in command. During World War II, LST-1083 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She was decommissioned in August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 8 September 1950, LST-1083 performed extensive service during the Korean War. For the next decade, she operated with the Pacific Fleet. The ship was redesignated Plumas County (LST-1083) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after a county in California. She was decommissioned again on 22 August 1961. Following service with the Military Sea Transportation Service commencing in December 1965, Plumas County was struck from the Navy list on 1 June 1972. LST-1083 earned one battle star for World War 11 service and three for the Korean War.

LST-1084 was laid down on 27 November 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 19 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. W. F. Shepherd and commissioned on 19 February 1945, Lt. Lawrence E. Prehn in command. Following World War II, LST-1084 performed occupation duty in the Far East until September 1945. She was decommissioned on 13 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 3 November 1950, she performed extensive service during the Korean War. The ship was redesignated Polk County (LST-1084) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after 12 counties in the United States. For the next 14 years, the tank landing ship operated with the Pacific Fleet, including deployments to the Far East and the Vietnam theater. She was decommissioned for the final time on 3 October 1969 and was struck from the Navy list on 15 September 1974. LST-1084 earned three battle stars for the Korean War and four battle stars for Vietnam War service.

LST-1085 was redesignated AG-148 and named Colington (q.v.) on 27 January 1949.

LST-1086 was laid down on 5 December 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 28 January 1945 sponsored by Miss Julia L. Rowan and commissioned on 24 February 1945, Lt. David J. Ward in command. Following World War 11, LST-1086 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late March 1946. She was decommissioned on 7 August 1946 and assigned to the Atlantic Reserve Fleet. On I July 1955, the ship was redesignated Potter County (LST-1086) (q.v.) after counties in Pennsylvania, South Dakota, and Texas. The tank landing ship was transferred to Greece on 9 August 1960 where she served the Hellenic Navy as Ikaria (L-154).

LST-1087 was laid down on 11 December 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 3 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Robert Maybin and commissioned on 2 March 1945, Lt. H. C. Moses in command. Following World War II, LST-1087 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early April 1947. She was decommissioned on 11 August 1947 and struck from the Navy list on 29 September that same year. On 18 April 1948, the ship was transferred to the United States Army for operation.

LST-1088 was laid down on 16 December 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 11 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. A. J. Paddock and commissioned on 27 March 1945, Lt. Sheldon Potter III in command. Following World War II, LST-1088 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She was decommissioned on 29 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. On 1 July 1955, the ship was redesignated Pulaski County (LST-1088) (q.v.) after seven counties in the United States. She was recommissioned on 21 May 1963 for service in the Atlantic Fleet. Pulaski County later served in Vietnam. In July 1967, the tank landing ship was transferred to the Military Sea Transportation Service for operation by a civilian crew. LST-1088 earned two battle stars for Vietnam War service.

LST-1089 was laid down on 20 December 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 17 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. R. C. Robinson and commissioned on 28 March 1945, Lt. Marvin A. Cohen in command. Following World War II, LST-1089 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She was decommissioned on 16 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 6 September 1950, LST-1089 saw extensive service in Korea and later with the Pacific Fleet in the Far East and the eastern Pacific. On 1 July 1955, she was redesignated Rice County (LST- 1089) (q.v.) after counties in Kansas and Minnesota. The ship was decommissioned again on 9 March 1960 and transferred to the West German Navy in October 1960 where she served as Bochum (N-120). Rice County was struck from the Navy list on I November 1960. She was later sold by the United States to the Turkish Navy in December 1972 where she served as Sanlaktar (A-580). LST-1089 earned four battle stars for Korean War service.

LST-1090 was laid down on 28 December 1944 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 24 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. R. B. Hunter and commissioned on 2 April 1945, Lt. E. J. Doering, USNR, in command. Following World War 11, LST-1090 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She was decommissioned on 22 July 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet, Recommissioned on 3 November 1950, LST-1090 performed extensive service during the Korean War and operated with the Pacific Fleet for the next decade. On 1 July 1955, the ship was redesignated Russell County (LST-1090) (q.v.) after counties in Alabama, Kansas, Kentucky, and Virginia. She was decommissioned for the last time on 5 April 1960 and struck from the Navy list on 1 November that same year. LST-1090 earned three battle stars for Korean War service.

LST-1091 was laid down on 3 January 1945 at Ambridge, Pa., by the American Bridge Co. launched on 3 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. R. W. Robinson and commissioned on 6 April 1945, Lt. Milton S. Johnston, USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1091 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. She was decommissioned on 5 July 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. On 1 July 1955, the ship was redesignated Sagadahoc County (LST-1091) (q.v.) after a county in Maine. The tank landing ship was transferred to the Republic of China Navy in October 1958 where she served as Chung Chih (LST-226). She was struck from the Navy list on 6 February 1959.

LST-1092 was redesignated ARVE-3 and named Aventinus (q.v.) on 8 December 1944. LST-1093 LST-1093 was redesignated ARVA-5 and named Fabins (q.v.) on 8 December 1944. LST-1094 LST-1094 was redesignated ARVE-4 and named Chloris (q.v.) on 8 December 1944. LST-1095 LST-1095 was redesignated ARVA-6 and named Megara (q.v.) on 8 December 1944.

LST-1096 was laid down on 27 November 1944 at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. launched on 10 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Elizabeth L. Middleton and commissioned on 2 February 1945, Lt. Lester W. Sperberg in command. During World War II, LST-1096 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945. She was decommissioned on 24 August 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 3 October 1950, LST-1096 saw extensive service during the Korean War. Following the Korean armistice in 1953, the tank landing craft continued to operate with the Pacific Fleet, alternating services along the west coast of the United States with deployments to the Far East. She was redesignated St. Clair County (LST-1096) (q.v.) on 1 July 1955 after counties in five states. During the period 1966 to 1969, St. Clair County performed logistic support duty off Vietnam. Decommissioned again on 26 September 1969, she was reassigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Bremerton, Wash. LST-1096 earned one battle star for World War II, three for Korea, and three battle stars and 1 award of the Navy Unit Commendation for Vietnam service.

LST-1097 was laid down on 22 November at Jeffersonville, Ind., by the Jeffersonville Boat & Machine Co. launched on 16 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Susan A. Rash and commissioned on 9 February 1945, Lt. Earl J. Lane in command. During World War II, LST-1097 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She was decommissioned on 19 December 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. On 27 January 1949, the ship was redesignated AG- 149 and named League Island (q.v.). Recommissioned on 3 January 1951 the cargo stores ship performed service during the Korean War. Redesignated AKS-30, she continued service with the Pacific Fleet into 1956. Decommissioned again on 14 December 1956, League Island was struck from the Navy list on 1 April 1960 and sold for scrapping to the Hatch & Kirk Co., Seattle, Wash., on 24 April 1961. LST-1097 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1098 was redesignated ARST-1 and named Laysan Island (q.v.) on 8 December 1944. LST-1099 LST-1099 was redesignated ARST-2 and named Okala (q.v.) on 8 December 1944. LST-1100 LST-1100 was redesignated ARST-3 and named Palmyra (q.v.) on 8 December 1944.

LST-1101 was laid down on 22 November 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 3 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. James J. Tolson and commissioned on 26 January 1945, Lt. James M. Trotman, Jr., USNR, in command, During World War II, LST-1101 was assigned to the Asiatic-Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. The ship was decommissioned on 6 June 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 3 November 1950, LST-1101 performed extensive service during the Korean War. She was redesignated Saline County (LST-1101) (q.v.) after counties in five states of the United States. She continued to operate with the Pacific Fleet until she was again decommissioned on 9 March 1960. Struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1960, Saline County was later transferred to the German Navy where she was converted to a minelayer and served as Bottrop (N121) until September 1971. In December 1972, she was sold to Turkey where she served in the Turkish Navy as Bayraktar (A- 581). LST-1101 earned one battle star for World War II service and five battle stars for Korean War service.

LST-1102 was laid down on 23 November 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 10 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Odette Snyder and commissioned on 29 January 1945, Lt. L. J. Patterson, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1102 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early October 1947. She was decommissioned on 21 November 1947 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. The ship was redesignated AG-150 on 27 January 1949 and assigned the name Chimon, after an island off the coast of Connecticut, on 1 February 1949. Recommissioned on 27 December 1950, Chimon supported operations in the Korean War. Reclassified AKS-31 on 18 August 1951, she operated with the Pacific Fleet into 1957. Decommissioned again on 22 April 1958, Chimon was struck from the Navy list on 2 November 1959 and sold. LST-1102 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1103 was laid down on 28 November 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 13 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. E. S. Paschall and commissioned on 31 January 1945, Lt. Comdr. R. D. Foster, USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1103 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early March 1946. She was decommissioned on 18 June 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 23 June 1947. On 17 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Oil Transport Co., New Orleans, La., for non-self- propelled operation.

LST-1104 was laid down on 1 December 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 17 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Walter G. Koch and commissioned on 8 February 1945, Lt. John F. Kelly, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1104 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early April 1946. She was decommissioned on 8 July 1946. On 28 April 1947, the ship was sold to the Quarterman Corp. for operation. She was struck from the Navy list on 22 May 1947. LST-1104 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1105 was laid down on 5 December 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 20 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. William J. Peters and commissioned on 13 February 1945, Lt. Lionel B. King, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1105 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-February 1946. She was decommissioned on 29 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June that same year. On 20 May 1948, the ship was sold to the California Co. for operation. LST-1105 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1106 was laid down on 9 December 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 24 January 1945 and commissioned on 16 February 1945, Lt. Jack Flinn, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1106 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East until late September 1945. She was decommissioned on 2 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 8 October that same year. On 13 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Walter W. Johnson Co. for scrapping. LST-1106 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1107 was laid down on 13 December 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 29 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Frank Parks and commissioned on 21 February 1945, Lt. G. P. Lynch in command. Following World War II, LST-1107 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-October 1945. She was decommissioned on 1 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 3 July that same year. On 28 February 1947, the ship was sold to Higgins, Inc., for operation.

LST-1108 was laid down on 16 December 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 1 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Edward H. Barnard and commissioned on 27 February 1945, Lt. C. V. Lieb in command. Following World War II, LST-1108 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early December 1945. She was decommissioned on 15 August 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 25 September that same year. On 10 January 1948, the ship was sold to the Argentine Navy where she served as Cabo San Vicente (BDT-14).

LST-1109 was laid down on 21 December 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 6 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Paul H. Derrick and commissioned on 28 February 1945, Lt. William A. McCaskill, USNR, in command. Following World War 11, LST-1109 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. She was decommissioned on 6 May 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 19 June that same year. On 13 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Walter W. Johnson Co. for scrapping.

LST-1110 was laid down on 28 December 1944 at Evansville, Ind., by the Missouri Valley Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 9 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Sydney Kolb and commissioned on 7 March 1945, Lt. Alton S. Lee, USNR, in command. During World War II, LST-1110 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late January 1947. For the succeeding 10 years, LST-1110 engaged in arctic resupply operations, operating out of ports on the California coast. On 1 July 1955, she was redesignated San Bernardino County (LST-1110) (q.v.) after a county in California. Decommissioned on 15 August 1958, San Bernardino County was transferred to the Republic of China Navy as Chung Chiang (LST-225). She was struck from the Navy list on 6 February 1959. LST-1110 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1111 was redesignated AKS-16 and named Blackford (q.v.) on 8 December 1944. LST-1112 LST-1112 was redesignated AKS-17 and named Dorchester (q.v.) on 8 December 1944.

LST-1113 LST-1113 was redesignated AKS-18 and named Kingman (q.v.) on 8 December 1944.

LST-1114 LST-1114 was redesignated AKS-19 and named Presque Isle (q.v.) on 8 December 1944. Her name was later changed to Vanderburgh (q.v.) on 17 February 1945, and she was redesignated APB-45 on 7 March 1945.

LST-1115 was laid down on 29 September 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 22 December 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Margaret Reed and placed in reduced commission on 4 January 1945. She was subsequently decommissioned on 6 February 1945 and underwent conversion. LST-1115 was later commissioned as Pentheus (ARL-20) (q.v.) on 7 June 1945.

LST-1116 was laid down on 2 October 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 28 December 1944 sponsored by Mrs. Lucile H. Kelley-, and commissioned on 9 January 1945. She was decommissioned on 15 February 1945, and underwent conversion and was recommissioned as Proserpine (ARL-21) (q.v.) on 31 May 1945.

LST-1117 was laid down on 10 October 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 2 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Angeline C. Pattelli and placed in reduced commission on 13 January 1945. LST-1117 underwent conversion and was placed in full commission as Tantalus (ARL-27) (q.v.) on 5 June 1945.

LST-1118 was laid down on 17 October 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 5 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. F. E. Kittredge and commissioned on 18 January 1945, Lt. Bernard M. Jacobsen, USNR, in command. Decommissioned on 16 February 1945, LST-1118 underwent conversion and was recommissioned as Typhon (ARL-28) (q.v.) on 18 June 1945.

LST-1119 was laid down on 19 October 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 11 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. M. D. Hembree and placed in partial commission on 23 January 1945. LST-1119 underwent conversion and was fully commissioned as Diomedes (ARB- 11) (q.v.) on 23 June 1945.

LST-1120 was laid down on 20 October 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 16 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Ruth Brown and commissioned on 9 February 1945. During World War II, LST-1120 was assigned to the Asiatic- Pacific theater and participated in the assault and occupation of Okinawa Gunto in May and June 1945. Following the war, she performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late January 1947. Decommissioned on 14 January 1948, the ship was struck from the Navy list on 19 February that same year. On 20 June 1948, she was sold to Consolidated Builders, Inc., Seattle, Wash., for scrapping. LST-1120 earned one battle star for World War II service.

LST-1121 was laid down on 25 October 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 19 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Willie Brown and placed in partial commission on 31 January 1945, Lt. P. P. Wynn, USNR, in command. LST-1121 underwent conversion to a battle damage repair ship and was commissioned as Demeter (ARB-10) (q.v.) on 3 July 1945.

LST-1122 was laid down on 30 October 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 24 January 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Alice Schmidt and commissioned on 14 February 1945, Lt. L. L. Hutchinson, USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1122 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late October 1945. Following occupation duty, LST-1122 operated off the west coast of the United States until 1949. Decommissioned on 15 June 1949, she was assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. Recommissioned on 3 November 1950, she performed extensive service during the Korean War. On 1 July 1955, LST-1122 was redesignated San Joaquin County (LST-1122) (q.v.) after a county in California. In the years that followed, the tank landing ship regularly deployed to the western and Central Pacific, operating in the Vietnam theater and the Trust Territories of the Pacific. San Joaquin County was decommissioned for a second time on 26 September 1969. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 May, 1972 and subsequently scrapped. LST-1122 earned five battle stars for the Korean War and one battle star for the Vietnam War.

LST-1123 was laid down on I November 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 29 January 1945 sponsored by Miss Betty Lou Bailey and commissioned on 19 February 1945, Lt. (jg.) John H. Cleaque III, USNR, in command. After World War II, LST-1123 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. Following occupation duty, she operated off the west coast of the United States until the outbreak of the Korean War. She performed extensive service during the war, including the amphibious invasion at Inchon. She was redesignated Sedgwick County (LST-1123) (q.v.) after counties in Colorado and Kansas on 1 July 1955 and was decommissioned on 9 September that same year. Recommissioned on 4 June 1966, Sedgwick County participated in logistic support activities in the Vietnam theater. Decommissioned again on 6 December 1969, Sedgwick County was assigned once again to the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Mare Island, Calif. She was struck from the Navy list on 15 March 1975 and transferred to the Malaysian Navy on 7 October 1976 where she served as Rajah Jarom (A-1502). LST-1123 earned six battle stars for the Korean War and seven battle stars and one award of the Meritorious Unit Commendation for the Vietnam War.

LST-1124 was laid down on 6 November 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 1 February 1945 sponsored by Miss Lillie Williams Kidd and placed in partial commission on 3 March 1945. LST-1124 underwent conversion to a landing craft repair ship and was commissioned as Amphitrite (ARL-29) (q.v.) on 28 June 1945.

LST-1125 was laid down on 15 November 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 6 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. June Elizabeth Reimer and placed in reduced commission on 17 February 1945. LST-1125 underwent conversion to a motor torpedo boat tender and was commissioned as Brontes (AGP-17) (q.v.) on 14 August 1945.

LST-1126 was laid down on 16 November 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 9 February 1945 sponsored by Miss Gladys Minor Woodruff and commissioned on 28 February 1945, Lt. F. C. Helm, USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1126 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945. For the next 25 years, she operated with the U.S. Pacific Fleet with numerous deployments to the western Pacific. She conducted extensive logistic support operations in the Vietnam theater during the period 1965 to 1970. She was redesignated Snohomish County (LST-1126) (q.v.) after a county in Washington on 1 July 1955. Decommissioned on 1 July 1970, Snohomish County was struck from the Navy list and sold to the Chin Ho Fa Steel & Iron Co., Ltd., Taiwan, in January 1971 for scrapping. LST-1126 earned eight battle stars for Vietnam service.

LST-1127 was laid down on 23 November 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 14 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Evelyn P. Adams and commissioned on 26 February 1945, Lt. Adam W. Melohusky in command. Decommissioned on 16 March 1945, LST-1127 underwent conversion to a battle damage repair ship and was commissioned again as Helios (ARB-12) (q.v.) on 23 July 1945.

LST-1128 was laid down on 23 November 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 19 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Marie Staat and commissioned on 9 March 1945. Following World War 11, LST-1128 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until early February 1946. She was decommissioned on 29 July 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. On 1 July 1955, the ship was redesignated Solano County (LST-1128) (q.v.) after a county in California. She was struck from the Navy list on I November 1958 and transferred to the Indonesian Navy where she served as Teluk Langsa (LST-501).

LST-1129 was laid down on 29 November 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 22 February 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Elizabeth P. Leatzow and commissioned on 6 March 1945, Lt. J. K. Marshall in command. Following World War II, LST-1129 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until mid- February 1946. She was decommissioned on 31 July 1946 and assigned to the Pacific Reserve Fleet. On 1 July 1955, the ship was redesignated Somervell County (LST-1129) (q.v.) after a county in Texas. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 November 1958.

LST-1130 was laid down on 5 December 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 27 February 1945 sponsored by Miss Bessie F. Jipson and commissioned on 20 March 1945, Lt. W. E. Johnson in command. Following World War II, LST-1130 performed occupation duty in the Far East and saw service in China until late November 1946. She was decommissioned and abandoned on 23 March 1948 following a grounding at Yap, Caroline Islands, which left the ship in a condition beyond economical repair. LST-1130 was struck from the Navy list on 12 March 1948.

LST-1131 was laid down on 8 December 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 2 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Patricia Ann Jacobsen and commissioned on 15 March 1945, Lt. C. L. Haslup in command. LST-1131 was decommissioned and underwent conversion to a landing craft repair ship, recommissioning as Askari (ARL-30) (q.v.) on 23 July 1945.

LST-1132 was laid down on 12 December 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 7 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Hazel S. Witherspoon and commissioned on 19 March 1945, Lt. P. P. Wynn in command. Decommissioned on 31 March 1945, LST-1132 underwent conversion to a landing craft repair ship, recommissioning as Bellerophon (ARL-31) (q.v.) on 21 July 1945.

LST-1133 was laid down on 16 December 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 10 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Theodora S. Tillman and placed in partial commission on 23 March 1945. Decommissioned on 17 April 1945, LST-1133 underwent conversion to a motor torpedo boat tender, recommissioning as Chiron (AGP-18) (q.v.) on 18 September 1945.

LST-1134 was laid down on 18 December 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 16 March 1945 sponsored by Miss Ella J. Arne and commissioned on 7 April 1945, Lt. C. R. Barheght, USNR, in command. After World War II, LST-1134 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. Following occupation duty, she performed logistic duties in the western Pacific for the next four years and then participated in operations in support of the Korean War. After the war, she engaged in hauling cargo and passengers between the various Hawaiian Islands from 1951 to 1966. On I July 1955, LST-1134 was redesignated Stark County (LST-1134) (q.v.) after counties in Illinois, North Dakota, and Ohio. On 16 May 1966, Stark County was transferred to the Royal Thai Navy where she served as Pangan (LST-3). She was subsequently struck from the Navy list. LST-1134 earned three battle stars for Korean War service.

LST-1135 was laid down on 26 December 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 21 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Doris P. Syfert and commissioned on 12 April 1945, Lt. L. A. Morgan in command. Following World War II, LST-1135 performed occupation duty in the Far East until late September 1946. She was decommissioned on 28 April 1948 and transferred to the Maritime Administration for disposal on 29 June 1948. LST- 1135 was struck from the Navy list on 12 August 1948. LST-1136 LST-1136 was laid down on 27 December 1944 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 26 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Huberta J. Malsie and commissioned on 6 April 1945, Lt. P. P. Wynn in command. Decommissioned on 27 April 1945, LST-1136 underwent conversion to a landing craft repair ship, recommissioning as Bellona (ARL-32) (q.v.) on 26 July 1945.

LST-1137 was laid down on 3 January 1945 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 30 March 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Dorothy L. Mahoney and placed in reduced commission on 11 April 1945. Decommissioned on 7 May 1945, LST-1137 underwent conversion to a landing craft repair ship, recommissioning as Chimaera (ARL-33) (q.v.) on 7 August 1945.

LST-1138 was laid down on 6 January 1945 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 5 April 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Hattie R. Fox and commissioned on 24 April 1945, Lt. D. C. Smith, USNR, in command. Following World War II, LST-1138 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early January 1946. After post-war operations with the Pacific Fleet, LST-1138 saw extensive service during the Korean War. On 1 July 1955, she was redesignated Steuben County (LST- 1138) (q.v.) after counties in Indiana and New York. She was struck from the Navy list on 1 February 1961 and sold to Zidell Explorations, Inc., Portland, Oreg., on 11 August 1961. LST-1138 earned five battle stars for her Korean War service.

LST-1139 was laid down on 15 January 1945 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 9 April 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Helen G. Hines and commissioned on 27 April 1945, Lt. John J. Flood, Jr., in command. Following World War II, LST-1139 performed occupation duty in the Far East until mid-December 1945. She was decommissioned on 20 July 1946 and struck from the Navy list on 15 August that same year. On 28 June 1948, the ship was sold to the Port Houston Iron Works, Inc., Houston, Tex., for non-self-propelled operation.

LST-1140 was laid down on 17 January 1945 at Seneca, Ill., by the Chicago Bridge & Iron Co. launched on 13 April 1945 sponsored by Mrs. Eugenia L. Renkosik and commissioned on 4 May 1945. Following World War II, LST-1140 performed occupation duty in the Far East until early November 1945 . She was decommissioned on 3 June 1949 and struck from the Navy list on 15 August that same year. On 26 January 1950, the ship was sold to the Foss Launch & Tug Co., Seattle, Wash.


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